Tag:Joe Smith
Posted on: October 27, 2011 3:34 pm
 

Video: A pumpkin has angered Joe Smith

By Matt Moore

No, seriously. That's the video. See? Via the Basketball Jones

 

Uh... how to close this. Oh, wait, got it!

Smith averaged .5 points and 1.5 rebounds in 12 games last year for the Lakers.

Genius.  
Posted on: December 14, 2010 6:40 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:36 pm
 

Nets, Lakers, Rockets, Kings talk trades

The New Jersey Nets, Los Angeles Lakers and Houston Rockets are discussing a three-team trade involving Terrence Williams, Sasha Vujacic andterrence-williams Joe Smith. Posted by Ben Golliver

Multiple outlets, including Yahoo! Sports and CBSSports.com's Ken Berger, are reporting that the New Jersey Nets, Los Angeles Lakers and Houston Rockets have a three-team trade in place. Berger writes...
The Nets have begun putting into motion a plan to acquire several assets that the Nuggets have asked for in a potential blockbuster trade for Carmelo Anthony, two people familiar with the situation told CBSSports.com. 
The first step, agreed to in principle Tuesday, is a three-team trade in which the Nets get a first-round pick from the Rockets and another one from the Lakers. New Jersey sends Terrence Williams to the Rockets and Joe Smith to the Lakers, who send Sasha Vujacic to the Nets, the people familiar with the framework of the deal said. 
Berger also notes that the trade cannot be completed until tomorrow, once the NBA's Dec. 15 deadline for players that were signed in the offseason to be traded has passed. Williams, a physical second-year wing out of Louisville who is averaging 6.7 points, 3.6 rebounds and 3.1 assists in 20.6 minutes per game this season, ran afoul of the Nets and coach Avery Johnson in late November, when he repeatedly showed up late for practices and was demoted to the D-League. He will join former teammate Courtney Lee in Houston, who was traded to the Rockets in a four-team trade last summer.  Given Williams's talent level and need for a change of scenery, the move is a reasonable risk for the Rockets, who have struggled through a 9-14 start and are currently in last place in the Southwest Division. To make room for Williams, ESPN.com reports that the Rockets will dump little-used reserve guard Jermaine Taylor, who has long been rumored as a candidate for trade, to the Sacramento Kings for a future second-round pick.  Smith, a veteran big man, has barely touched the floor for New Jersey this season and is essentially a non-factor. Vujacic has also been buried on Los Angeles's bench this season, after the team's offseason acquisitions of Matt Barnes and Steve Blake, and the continued emergence of Shannon Brown, pushed him down and out of the team's depth chart. The move is a great one for Los Angeles, as they move the $5.4 million owed to Vujacic off their books. Taking back the $1.3 million owed to Smith, the Lakers net $4.1 million in cap savings and the only cost is a first round draft pick, which will likely be no higher than No. 25. As the Lakers are well over the luxury tax line, those savings are doubled, making for a total savings of ~$8 million, making this deal even sweeter. Sure, the Lakers aren't exactly a small market team aching for savings, but any time you can turn a bottom of the first round pick into ~$8 million worth of savings, you do it and you don't think twice.  From New Jersey's side, it's the picks, not the players, who are the obvious key to this deal, as they afford the Nets important additional assets to use in trade talks prior to this year's deadline. Their major target, of course, could be Denver Nuggets all star forward Carmelo Anthony. The Nuggets, as we've written numerous times, need to receive salary cap flexibility and future assets when they move Anthony, and first round picks certainly qualify. So does Vujacic's expiring contract, which could be re-packaged to allow the Nets to take back salary in a deal. At first glance, this trade is a winner for all parties. The Rockets take a reasonable risk on a talented player, the Lakers receive some much-needed financial relief and the Nets accumulate trade assets. The final chapter to this trade analysis book can't be written until we see what deals are in New Jersey's future.
Posted on: October 26, 2010 2:50 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:06 pm
 

How should the NBA punish the Knicks?

The New York Knicks reportedly made repeated illegal contact with college players. Assuming the allegations are true, whatdavid-stern  punishment from the NBA is appropriate? Posted by Ben Golliver Earlier, we noted a Yahoo! Sports report  that quotes multiple players saying that they illegally worked out with a New York Knicks scout prior to the draft period.  Surely, executives and scouts throughout the NBA work the corners of the permissible contact guidelines, looking to achieve the slightest of competitive advantages by improving their intel on draft-eligible players. Stories are told about this or that executive watching a workout that he wasn't supposed to, and the NBA has already levied large fines and suspensions in the past in the most innocuous of cases, including Denver Nuggets coach George Karl sitting in on a workout that included his own son Coby . But there are a number of aspects to the Yahoo! report that should lead NBA Commissioner David Stern and the league office to throw the book at the Knicks, assuming the allegations are true.
  • First, the repeated contact. By illegally contacting multiple players over multiple years, the Knicks can't plead ignorance or "this was a one time thing". The allegations reveal a pattern of illegal behavior, which violates not only the league's Collective Bargaining Agreement but also even the most minimal attempt at fair play. The result is a serious black eye for the league and 29 other ticked off teams.
  • Second, allegations of contact with a player the team eventually drafted. A bad situation for the Knicks gets infinitely worse here because it involves Wilson Chandler, a player the team drafted after he was illegally worked out and who continues to play for the Knicks today. By contacting Chandler before the 2007 draft as alleged, the Knicks not only received a competitive advantage during the draft process, they continued to benefit from that competitive advantage every time he plays a game. While Chandler might not be a star player, he's averaged double figures over the course of a three-year career with the Knicks. Are we really supposed to believe there was no connection between the workouts and the eventual draft pick? Chandler's selection implicates Knicks management (and potentially its ownership and coaching staff, basically anyone that was in the draft war room) in this mess, undercutting any "rogue scout" excuse.
  • Third, the fact that Brandon Rush was injured during one of the illegal workouts, and apparently lied to his college coaches about the circumstances surrounding the injury, doesn't help matters. While Rush says no one told him to lie, and that may very well be true, his conduct speaks to the willfulness of his participation in the illegal contact. Rush, on some level, knew that what he was doing was wrong, or at least wasn't 100% right. That's a huge slippery slope for the league office, who is tasked with protecting the best interests of players during the draft process and ensuring competitive balance for all 30 teams.  
Taken together -- the repeated nature of the illegal contact, capitalizing on the competitive advantage by drafting a player that was illegally worked out, and the fact that the workouts included players who understood to some degree that they were not legitimate -- the league office has a very, very serious situation on its hands.  If everything sticks, Stern has little choice here. Unless he puts his foot down, and hard, he sends a message to 30 competitive GMs and 30 competitive scouting departments that there are rules, but they don't really matter. With that message comes all sorts of other messages: we don't truly care about protecting our (future) players, we don't care if the draft process is fair, we don't care if you flaunt our rules over and over again.  That is all bad, a horrible look for the NBA, a league that has dealt with fair play accusations in the recent past thanks to the Tim Donaghy scandal. Surely, the league will conduct a thorough investigation of the allegations. If everything comes back as reported, I would expect the Knicks to be in Joe Smith territory. Roughly 10 years ago , the Minnesota Timberwolves were levied a seven-figure fine and stripped of multiple first-round draft picks for reaching an illegal contract agreement with Smith. What the Knicks did here, particularly with Chandler, is much closer to what the Timberwolves did with Smith than what George Karl did with his son: illegal action that was repeated, beneficial and willful.  A seven-figure fine and the loss of multiple first-round draft picks (although the Knicks have done a nice job of stripping themselves of picks by trading them away) seems appropriate. The NBA draft process simply can't turn into the wild, wild west.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com