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Tag:Kevin McHale
Posted on: May 27, 2011 2:06 pm
Edited on: May 29, 2011 9:26 pm
 

Rockets offer McHale 3-year coaching deal

Rockets to hire Kevin McHale as new head coach.

Posted by Matt Moore



Yahoo! Sports reports and Ken Berger of CBSSports.com confirms the Houston Rockets have reached an agreement with Kevin McHale for the former Celtics great to become their next head coach. The report states the organization feels he can connect with their younger players and his career as a player will create a hunger for a championship. 

The Rockets-Celtics connections are pretty strong, with GM Daryl Morey having worked in Boston before taking the reins in Houston. Unfortunately, all this glosses over McHale's disastrous campaign in Minnesota, which featured multiple stints as head coach and a rocky if not terrible run as a general manager. Rockets fans will have significant questions about the hire, and the most optimistic response so far is one of "Well, I guess it's okay."

It also means yet another position for which Dwane Casey has been passed over, though the Mavericks assistant's current obligations may have something to do with that.

Update 2:23 p.m.: Yahoo! reports it's a three-year deal, with a team option for a fourth.
Posted on: May 21, 2011 4:18 pm
Edited on: May 21, 2011 4:33 pm
 

Report: Kevin McHale is 'frontrunner' for Rockets

Kevin McHale is reportedly the "frontrunner" to serve as the next head coach of the Houston Rockets. Posted by Ben Golliver. kevin-mchale

The Houston Rockets coaching search has dragged on for weeks, but the team has apparently found a favorite.

A few weeks back, Houston narrowed its list to three finalists: Lawrence Frank, Dwane Casey and Kevin McHale. On Saturday, Yahoo! Sports reports that McHale has emerged from the back as the "frontrunner." The site notes that McHale made "a strong final push in the interview process."
No final decision has officially been reached, nor are contract negotiations underway, but McHale has clearly separated himself from Dallas Mavericks assistant Dwane Casey and Boston Celtics assistant Lawrence Frank, sources said. McHale made a strong final impression in conversations with Houston officials on Thursday in Chicago, and could receive a formal offer in the next week.
The Rockets are clearly in a rebuilding phase, having missed the playoffs in each of the last two seasons. Injuries to Yao Ming have handcuffed the team, both from a financial perspective and a roster-building perspective.

For the Rockets, McHale might represent an experienced NBA veteran with an affable personality to pull a team through the rigors of a rebuilding effort. At age 53, McHale's time in the NBA spans more than three decades as a player, coach, executive and television commentator.

McHale's previous coaching experience came in two runs with the Minnesota Timberwolves, where he also served as a front office executive. McHale's career coaching record is 39-55.

As a player, McHale was a Hall of Fame forward for the Boston Celtics. He won three titles in his 13-year career and was selected to seven All-Star games.
Posted on: May 17, 2011 12:29 pm
 

Report: Rockets interview Lawrence Frank again

The Houston Rockets interviewed Lawrence Frank for their coaching position for the second time and Brian Shaw is no longer a candidate. Posted by Ben Golliver.

Are the Houston Rockets moving towards naming their next head coach? 

MyFoxHouston.com reports that the Rockets, who have been without a coach for a month now after parting ways with Rick Adelman, had a second interview with Lawrence Frank, one of three finalists, on Monday.
NBA sources told FOX 26 Sports Boston Celtics assistant coach Lawrence Frank was in Houston Monday for a second round of interviews with Rockets officials as the team searches for a new head coach.

He is one of three finalists to become the Rockets next head coach. The other two are Dallas Mavericks assistant coach Dwane Casey and former Minnesota Timberwolves head coach Kevin McHale.
Meanwhile, the Orange County Register reports that Los Angeles Lakers assistant Brian Shaw is officially out of the running, confirming that the Rockets are interested only in previous head coaches. 
That's why Shaw won't be going to the Houston Rockets, who were granted permission by the Lakers to pursue Shaw to be their head coach. Shaw has pulled out of that job search upon determining the Rockets preferred someone who has been a head coach. Shaw didn't want to stay in it if he wasn't likely to win it; he certainly doesn't need any more practice interviewing for top jobs. 
Frank makes a compelling base. Aside from having head coaching experience with the New Jersey Nets, he helped lead the Boston Celtics to the No. 2 defense in the NBA despite the departure of Chicago Bulls head coach Tom Thibodeau. If he was granted a second interview, though, the other finalists will likely be given the same treatment.

Casey's Mavericks begin the Western Conference finals on Tuesday night against the Oklahoma City Thunder.
Posted on: April 26, 2011 9:14 pm
Edited on: April 26, 2011 9:22 pm
 

Rockets to interview Kevin McHale, Sam Cassell

The Houston Rockets will reportedly interview Kevin McHale and Sam Cassell for their head coaching position. Posted by Ben Golliver. 

Last week, we noted that the Houston Rockets and former coach Rick Adelman mutually agreed to part ways, a sign that the team is ready to enter a rebuilding phase. It takes the right personality to lead a young team through a rebuilding process, as going from lottery team to playoff team can often be a process that spans multiple seasons in the NBA. 

Based on the early reports, the Rockets and GM Daryl Morey have clearly decided to evaluate all of their options in finding the right person for that position.

Yahoo! Sports reports on Tuesday that TNT commentator, former Minnesota Timberwolves coach and executive, and Hall of Fame Boston Celtics forward Kevin McHale will be granted an interview.
Kevin McHale will interview for the Houston Rockets coaching job, league sources told Yahoo! Sports.
The Rockets and McHale are still working on setting a date for the meeting, presumably around McHale’s playoff broadcasting responsibilities, a source said.
MyFoxHouston.com also reported on Tuesday that the Rockets would interview former Rockets point guard and current Washington Wizards coach Sam Cassell as well.
Add former Houston Rockets guard Sam Cassell to the list of candidates who will interview to become the Rockets next head coach.
League sources told FOX 26 Sports Cassell will meet with Rockets officials next week.
Meanwhile, the Houston Chronicle has reported that Milwaukee Bucks assistant coach Kelvin Sampson, Rockets assistant coach Jack Sikma, former Rockets forward Mario Elie and former Atlanta Hawks coach Mike Woodson are among the names under consideration.

Given the circumstances, an NBA lifer with a track record of losing like McHale, whose career record is 39-55, would be a disaster. Retreads and rebuilding are just a bad combination; coaches in these situations should inspire a fanbase, not demoralize it.

Morey is statistically-inclined, so you can be sure whoever he decides upon will at least be open to advice from upstairs. Really, the Rockets are better off seeking a dynamic fresh face with the ability to develop the team's young players and whose act hasn't yet grown tired. Tom Thibodeau, Monty Williams, Erik Spoelstra and Frank Vogel are four coaches who fit that profile and have guided their respective teams to the playoffs this season. 

There's a little bit of a youth movement going on in the NBA coaching ranks, and the Rockets would be wise to get on board that ship.
Posted on: August 12, 2010 9:05 am
Edited on: August 12, 2010 9:30 am
 

Shootaround 8.12.10: Scal with a clipboard?

Posted by Matt Moore

Did we overreact to the Malice in the Palace? Was it really that big of a deal when Ron Artest went into the stands and decked a fan who he thought hit him with a cup of soda (he didn't, some other dude did)? After all, Kevin McHale did pretty much the same thing in 1987. The answer of course, is no. Even if no one was significantly injured in either incident doesn't mean that the odds are good these types of things won't lead to it. There are kids in that lower bowl. Let's all agree near-riots are bad, m'kay?

While we're at it, let's keep "don't slap assistant coaches in Pro-Am leagues (or ever)" on the list as well.

Daryl Morey on the trade for Courtney Lee yesterday: "This is a guy who we were focused on acquiring in the (’08) draft. I think, overall, the deal is similar to the Kyle Lowry deal. We’ve been trying to acquire Courtney when he went to Orlando and then he went to New Jersey and as you can tell, myself being on vacation, you can just never tell when an opportunity is going to strike. We really target players who we think will fit in well here over time and when we got our first chance to acquire him we really were obviously fairly aggressive to get this done."

Lorenzo Wright's ex-wife (who has been investigated in connection to his murder) claims he left the house the night of his murder with drugs and money . This story gets progressively somehow more depressing.

Carlos Arroyo raps ! (Not well.)

Breathe a sigh of relief for the already depleted Team USA team. Danny Granger's finger is A-OK . You can pat your Pacer friends on the back as well.

Don't sleep on Shaun Livingston. I can never decide if Shaun Livingston is over-covered due to his hardships, or not covered enough. Either way, the idea of him with the Bobcats is a pretty solid concept. Larry Brown is the type of coach that appreciates the effort that Livingston has made to recover from injury.

Chris Bosh continues to drive the dagger into Toronto . It's kind of suprising. Some people you expect to behave cruelly to their former small-market comrades. But Bosh never struck me as that type. I was wrong in that assessment.

Shocking news, Rudy Fernandez wants out of Portland . No, really. No kidding. Like, seriously this time. No joshing.

Brian Scalabrine may be a coach . No, not a dancing coach. Quit laughing. It's not funny. Not that funny, at least.
Posted on: August 6, 2010 11:37 am
Edited on: August 6, 2010 11:46 am
 

Of leadership, LeBron, and KG

Posted by Matt Moore

Kevin Garnett is one of the most respected players in the NBA, with good reason. No one has shown  more focus at both ends of the floor over the past decade than Kevin Garnett. Much of his trademarked intensity is show; the screaming, spitting, growling is revealed as little more than theatrics when you employ them as often as he has. But that doesn't change how he's constantly barking out defensive assignments, dressing down teammates, and blocking the ever-loving crap out of anyone that dares to challenge his authority (or dying trying). He's a 13-time All-Star, and has an MVP trophy, a Defensive Player of the Year trophy, and an NBA champion.

And with all that respect that he has earned comes a level of expectation, often unfair, mostly ridiculous, that he live up to what we believe is the model of a true NBA legend. Or at least, that's been the pattern for everyone except KG. And if you want proof of that, compare KG and LeBron James.

In 2010, LeBron James abandoned his team, the Cavaliers, and did it in a publicly humiliating and disgracefully opulent way on national television. Maybe you heard about it, here and there. Before we continue, let's be very clear on this point:

The primary reason for the backlash against James is the way in which he announced his decision ("The Decision"), the way he seemingly laughed and skipped out of town while the dreams he had given Cleveland fans burned to the ground. There is simply no way to defend or even deflect that criticism. You're not going to find anyone outside of South Beach who thinks this was in any way acceptable. KG has never behaved in such a way, nor did he embarrass Minnesota on the way out of town. The way the two left is simply not comparable. See, I put it in bold, just so we're all clear on this.

However, the secondary argument against James is that he has in some way compromised his legacy, lessened his greatness, by not being the sole elite player on his team. He is no longer considered able to reach the sport's summit because he has joined Dwyane Wade's team instead of building championship gold from the rubble he was drafted into. That by joining other elite players, he can no longer be considered elite.

Let's head on back to 2007.

Kevin Garnett has failed to reach the summit with the Minnesota Timberwolves, the team that drafted him. Though there were a handful of very good teams, none of them even approached what you would call a "great" team. The Sam Cassell-Latrell Sprewell team rose and fell apart as fast as it came together, and Garnett has been losing consistently. It becomes known that he wants out, wants to be traded to a contender, does not want to waste his career any longer. He doesn't outright say he wants to be traded, after all, you're fined for such activity. But it's made pretty clear that his time with Minnesota is over. It's done. He winds up heading to Boston, joining Ray Allen and Paul Pierce, the captain, to form the first modern Big 3 and first relative superteam since the Lakers' 2004 crime against nature.

(It should be noted that the Spurs' combination of Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, and Manu Ginobili definitely constituted enough talent as to be considered a superteam, but more perhaps more impressively, they did it organically. They came to have three superstars by developing the talent they drafted. Not by acquiring the gold when the market was high on it.)

But KG was and is the leader, right? Well, I don't know. Paul Pierce is the captain, right? And the guy taking the game winning shots, most often? The face of the team? It's heart and soul? Isn't Pierce the one most often relied upon to rally the team? While Garnett is undeniably a leader on the Celtics, is he really considered the leader?

Oddly, what led me down this line of thought was a quote from, of all people, Rasho Nesterovic.

In an interview with rtvslo.com , and translated and brought forth by Project Spurs , Nesterovic talks about the difference between Garnett and Duncan. He discusses how Duncan won with the team that drafted him, and how Garnett made the smart move, but it was one to turn to the Celtics, who already had a leader in Pierce. This all leads to Nesterovic saying Duncan was the greater power forward of his time.

Huh.

Now, this is Rasho Nesterovic. We're not talking Bill Russell here. But the idea is one that deserves consideration. Did KG join the Celtics as a leader, or did he simply do the exact same thing that LeBron James did, only under better PR cover? The argument can certainly be made that James joined in free agency (which is apparently worse than bailing on your team while under contract with them), while Garnett was traded, so it wasn't really his decision. But if Garnett had told Minnesota management, "I don't want to be traded. I either win here, or I don't win at all," do you really think the Wolves would have said "No, no, Mr. Hall-of-Fame-Most-Beloved-Player-In
-Franchise-History, we want no part of you here"? Is that what you think would have occurred? Because I'm pretty sure Kevin McHale would have just gone back to figuring out ways to build the Wolves around KG (and failing miserably).

The argument could also be made that KG was on a "loser" while James was on a contending team. But there are two responses to that. 1. While this Cavs team was certainly better than any KG had, James has also been superior in terms of production (and playoff success if we're being honest) than anything KG had been. I'm simply pointing out that if you're going to say the Cavs were better, you also have to point out that James was better, and was a reason for the Cavs being better. And 2, is there really a difference between contender-but-not-champion and loser in our society? I don't subscribe to this. I think there are tons of brilliant players that simply were never fortunate enough to run into the blessed set of circumstances you need to win a championship (or play for LA). But if you're a results oriented person, KG and James had accomplished the same thing, and so to say that one needed to do what he needed in order to win a ring and the other needed to continue to struggle is a bit ridiculous.

We come to the crux of this, which is actually not that KG deserves more criticism or scorn for leaving Minnesota to fall into the void. Far from it. Garnett recognized that he needed to win a ring before his time was up, that it wasn't going to happen in Minny, and that Boston represented the best chance for him. He took it. He doesn't deserve to be slagged for that. Garnett has told other players not to let what happened to him in Minnesota happen to them. Now, that particular action is a little less likable. After all, there have been players that stayed "home" and eventually reached the promised land, and those championships are much more special to their small markets than the umpteenth championship for a storied franchise. This is nothing to do with the quality of the fans and just the simple fact that a lone championship means more than one of many.

But Garnett is simply passionate about being the best he can be. And for him, that meant joining a team with an established star, a veteran leader, along with another veteran leader, and winning a championship. That was his path. And it is not all that dissimilar from LeBron James' path (in terms of the end result; remember, the bold clause! The bold clause!). So if we're going to criticize James for not being "the man," we need to similarly disparage Garnett, Pau Gasol, and other players that did what they needed to in order to win a ring.

Garnett is no villain. He loved Minnesota. But in the end, he felt his best chance for achieving that ring was in Boston, alongside other stars. Those facts coincide with LeBron James' actions of the past three months. Even if you feel that Garnett was able to be a leader alongside Paul Pierce (the most rational and likely conclusion), you should at least recognize the same dynamic's likelihood in Miami. You don't have to like how James pulled off this career correction. No one does. But to question his legacy opens up a Pandora's Box that is linked throughout some of the greatest players in the history of the league.

Don't throw stones. The halls of NBA greatness are built of glass.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com