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Tag:Steve Kerr
Posted on: December 12, 2011 10:59 pm
 

Steve Kerr: Dan Gilbert needs to 'get over it'

Posted by Royce Young

After the NBA's ridiculous handling of the Chris Paul situation in New Orleans, a lot of people have felt the need to vent. I know I have. I caught myself yelling at my dog yesterday saying things like, "How dare the NBA intervene and manipulate the league!"

Steve Kerr though, has a much bigger voice and when he talks, a lot more people than a dog listen up. Kerr is a TNT analyst now, but was the Phoenix Suns general manager for a number of years and a prominant player on a couple of Michael Jordan's championship Bulls. He knows the inside of the business. He knows how it all works. And he is fired up about the way the NBA blocked CP3's trade to the Lakers, most notably about Dan Gilbert who sent an email to David Stern the day it happened complaining about it. Via Sports Radio Interviews:
"It's such a crock that he would even mention that. That guy is a billionaire, they have been way over the cap while they had LeBron, way over the tax. He's still upset that he lost LeBron and he needs to get over it. LeBron gave that franchise the best seven years they have ever had. He was a free agent and he decided to leave. Nobody likes the way LeBron left, even he apologized for it the other night on TV but the fact is there is a thing called free agency and if a superstar player wants to leave when they are agents, they can leave."
Tell us how you really feel, Steve.

But he couldn't be more right. Gilbert was complaining about things like the luxury tax and how the Lakers were going to save money, therefore cutting into the revenue shared with small market teams like his Cavs. Gilbert said that 25 teams were the Washington Generals. He's basically been playing quite the woe-is-me thing ever since LeBron left the Cavs.

Kerr on the trade itself:
"Every one of them is wrong and I don't know how many there are either but I've been angry all day long about this whole thing because I think it was a great basketball trade. There are so many trades made these days that are lousy trades that are made for financial purposes ... The problem I have is that this was a great trade for the Hornets.

There's no way they can duplicate that. I thought Dell Demps did an incredible job. You end up with three legitimate good players in (Luis) Scola, Kevin Martin, and (Lamar) Odom. You get a first round pick, you get Goran Dragic who I like and a guy I drafted in Phoenix. He's a good player. You're telling me you're going to deny that for basketball reasons when every single other analyst out there and every GM thinks they hit a home run with that trade. And by the way in seven months if they play it out they are getting nothing."

[...]

I made one of the worst trades in NBA history. I traded Kurt Thomas and two first round picks to Seattle for nothing, to save 16 million dollars for our organization. Where was the NBA then to veto that trade for basketball reasons?"
First, I love that Kerr acknowledges how bad the Thomas trade was. He made it to save Robert Sarver some money, but that deal ended up giving then Seattle and now the Thunder, two first round picks, one of which turned into Serge Ibaka. Like he said, why didn't the league intervene with that?

The point with this whole thing is, is that the league shouldn't have such a heavy hand here. Yes, the NBA owns the Hornets. But it's also supposed to oversee the league and make sure things stay fair. It's supposed to stay out of the way. For as much as the NBA preached competitive balance, they sure have stuck their thumb out and intentionally hurt the Rockets and Lakers. It's not fair and it's got people like Steve Kerr angry.

I would say that it's going to be awkward when TNT does a Cavs game, but we all know that nobody is wasting a national television game on the Cavs. Unless LeBron's coming to town. The truth hurts, huh Dan?

Via Deadspin
Posted on: January 30, 2011 9:32 pm
Edited on: January 30, 2011 11:03 pm
 

Knicks to hire Mark Warkentien as consultant

The New York Knicks will reportedly hire former Denver Nuggets executive Mark Warkentien. Posted by Ben Golliver. mark-warkentien

Here's some news that figures to kick up another solid round of Carmelo Anthony trade rumors: the New York Knicks are reportedly set to hire former Denver Nuggets vice president of basketball operations Mark Warkentien as a consultant to president Donnie Walsh, according to Yahoo! Sports.
In a move that undoubtedly has roots in the pursuit of Carmelo Anthony, New York Knicks president Donnie Walsh has reached an agreement with former Denver Nuggets general manager Mark Warkentien to join the Knicks as a high-level consultant, league sources told Yahoo! Sports on Sunday.
The hiring of Warkentien is expected to be a prelude to a larger and more specific front-office role in the future, but that’s still an issue to be worked out. As the Knicks work to acquire Anthony through a trade this season or in free agency this summer, there’s no minimizing Warkentien’s institutional knowledge of the Nuggets organization and ownership, as well as a strong relationship with Anthony.
Ken Berger of CBSSports.com confirms the Yahoo! report and further explores the hiring's implications on the Anthony trade talks.

The New York Daily News reports Anthony's reaction to the news: "As far as I'm concerned that's a great addition to their organization."

Warkentien is perhaps best known for landing point guard Chauncey Billups in a blockbuster 2008 trade for Allen Iverson. He has also established a reputation as a negotiations expert, having studied the art of deal-making extensively at Harvard.

Nuggets owner Stan Kroenke is said to be a demanding man to work for, as he runs the Nuggets by focusing on payroll management and profit maximization to a degree many owners do not. Pitching a deal with the scope and magnitude of a Carmelo Anthony trade takes a keen sense for what motivates an owner, and Warkentien's direct knowledge of those motivations would absolutely be an asset that could pay immediate dividends for the Knicks.

Still, this move feels like more than just "Melo-or-bust" for New York. Warkentien was named NBA Executive of the Year for 2008-2009 and was one of the biggest available names among the group of former NBA GMs, alongside Kevin Pritchard, Danny Ferry and Steve Kerr. Warkentien brings roughly 20 years of NBA experience to the table -- including a long record of scouting -- and the network of relationships that go along with that experience. 

During the four seasons that Warkentien headed up the Nuggets, Denver won 45, 50, 54 and 53 games. So whether or not Warkentien helps the Knicks land Anthony prior to the trade deadline, his hiring represents another sign that the Knicks franchise, a team on the rise, is looking for people to help transform it into a true title contender. 
Posted on: January 20, 2011 12:27 pm
 

Former Suns GM Steve Kerr to call NCAA Final Four

Former Phoenix Suns GM Steve Kerr will call the 2011 NCAA Final Four. Posted by Ben Golliver. steve-kerr 

In a somewhat unexpected plot twist, CBS Sports has added to the announcing group for the 2011 NCAA Final Four, tabbing former Phoenix Suns general manager and TNT television commentator Steve Kerr to join the call. Other TNT favorites, like Charles Barkley and Kenny Smith, will also be doing studio work during the tournament.

The championship tips-off with the NCAA FIRST FOUR on truTV Tuesday, March 15, with Jim Nantz, Clark Kellogg and Steve Kerr calling the action, with Tracy Wolfson courtside. Nantz, Kellogg, Kerr and Wolfson will team up again when the tournament concludes with the Final Four and Championship game on Saturday, April 2 and Monday, April 4 on CBS Sports. Nantz will be covering his 26th Final Four and National Championship, Kellogg will be working both events for the third time, with Kerr joining to call his first Final Four and National Championship. Gus Johnson and Len Elmore, along with courtside reporter Craig Sager, will handle the call for the FIRST FOUR games on Wednesday, March 16, on truTV. 

Two studios, based in New York and Atlanta, will be used to cover all the action. Studio coverage will be anchored by Greg Gumbel and Ernie Johnson, who will share hosting duties during each day. Charles Barkley, Greg Anthony and Kenny Smith will provide analysis throughout the tournament alongside Gumbel or Johnson from the CBS Broadcast Center in New York. Analysts Reggie Miller and Seth Davis will join the New York studio rotation for the second week of the tournament. Matt Winer will host the studio coverage from Turner’s Atlanta studio with analysts Davis and Steve Smith.

While an outside-the-box move considering Kerr's lack of college basketball announcing experience, it's an easy one to co-sign. Kerr is as clear-headed, concise, knowledgeable and experienced as any color commentator working basketball games today, having mastered the art of not boring his listeners by revealing behind-the-scenes wrinkles or taking contrarian postures but backing them up fully. 

Kerr also played in the 1988 Final Four, shooting a ridiculous 57.3% from three-point land and making second-team All-American. So he comes to this booth with first-hand insight into what the players are going through, what they will be going through in their professional futures, what professional talent evaluators will be looking for from the players and as an experienced media professional with a firm grasp on storylines and drama. 

Kerr left the Suns somewhat abruptly last June, amidst rumors of mismanaged contract negotiations by owner Robert Sarver. 

As for Ernie Johnson, Charles Barkley, Kenny Smith and the gang? More is always better, even when Chuck is dancing. Hopefully Craig Sager turns down the volume on his wardrobe; after all, there will be kids present.
Posted on: January 18, 2011 1:17 pm
Edited on: January 18, 2011 1:24 pm
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Posted on: October 26, 2010 1:14 pm
 

Steve Kerr says the $350M loss number is accurate

Posted by Royce Young

If you're an NBA observer watching the current labor issues and CBA negotiations, you don't know what to believe. The players' union says the league is making tons of money. The league says its losing tons of money. The fans don't care. We just don't want to lose basketball games.

But in an interview with CNN.com, former Suns general manager and current TNT analyst Steve Kerr agrees with the league's financial position.

CNN: You were a general manager and a player, so you've seen the league's economics from both sides. The NBA is projecting about $350 million in losses this season -- do you think that's an accurate figure?

Kerr: Yes. Having been on the management and seeing a lot of numbers both in Phoenix and elsewhere, I think that's an accurate number.

Well then. 

Kerr attributes the financial troubles to rising player costs in a bad economy. We've heard that story. But he also mentions how owners are equally to blame because previously bought teams 30 years ago for $20 million just waiting for the value of their franchise to skyrocket, so they were fine with losing some money. Now, Kerr says, owners buy teams for $300-400 million and can't afford to watch the money fly out the door because there's not a big payoff in the future.

And then of course the issue of reducing player salary. Here's Kerr's thoughts:

CNN: Is it realistic that player costs can be reduced by 1/3 as the commissioner David Stern says he wants to do?

Kerr: I don't think anyone really knows. Usually in these situations, Stern's the master in these negotiations for sure and everything he says is calculated and there's a plan behind it and maybe the plan is go for 1/3 and get 1/4 -- I don't know. He knows what he wants, he knows how to get it, and he also knows that it is a partnership with the players and there has to be compromise and we'll see how it all unfolds.

Stern definitely knows what he wants. And he knows the league and the owners have the upper hand. It's all a matter of how hard and how long the players are willing to fight. Kerr said a lockout is very possible and that this situation is "more severe" than in 1999, the last time there were negotiations.

Stern says this might be the best NBA season ever. Let's hope it is, because we might have to savor it for a little while if things don't start looking up.

Category: NBA
Posted on: July 12, 2010 11:05 pm
Edited on: July 12, 2010 11:22 pm
 

So... what exactly is tampering?

Posted by Royce Young

With information beginning to surface on how things went down in Miami, the first thing most likely thought was, "Wow, that's crazy stuff." And after that, some probably thought, "Hey, isn't all that like tampering or something?" David Stern said it was not, even though Ken Berger thinks differently .

You know the word. You've heard it. But what really is "tampering"?

Basically, teams can't talk about players on other teams until July 1, the day free agency negotiations begin. Some even dubbed this the "LeBron James Rule" because that's really where most the fines stemmed from, especially recently. However, some form of tampering goes back as far as 1984 , where the NBA investigated illegal contact between teams and college stars Patrick Ewing and Hakeem Olajuwon. So while the current definition really involves the media, tampering is essentially teams talking when they shouldn't be.

For instance, a couple cases from this offseason: Mark Cuban was famously fined $100,000 for what some might have perceived as innocent comments about LeBron; former Phoenix Suns President of Basketball Operations Steve Kerr was fined $10,000 for comments he made in a radio interview with Dan Patrick about LeBron; and Atlanta Hawks owner Michael Gearon, Jr. was fined $25,000 for comments he made to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution about James.

To spare you a Google search, here's what the three said:

Cuban : "Come July 1, yeah, of course. Anybody would be interested in LeBron James and if he leaves via free agency, then it’s going to be tough. If he does like I’m guessing … which is say ‘I’m not going to leave the Cavs high and dry,’ then he’ll try to force a sign-and-trade and that gives us a chance."

Kerr : "Well, if he'll take mid-level, we'll give it to him." "What's mid-level?" Patrick said, referring to the mid-level exception for teams exceeding the salary cap. "About five and a half million," Kerr said. "I think he'll take it, don't you think?"

Gearon : "If somebody came to us tomorrow and said you can have LeBron for max money and it puts you in the luxury tax, I'd do it in a heartbeat. But am I going to do that for Ilgauskas? Am I going to do it for Jermaine O'Neal? I don't think so."

All three didn't seem like much. Kerr's were very clearly a joke. But that's exactly what the NBA anti-tampering rules try and prevent: whimsical, supposedly innocent comments to the media about potential free agents still under contract with another team. The rule appears simple. But as seen with Cuban's recent frustrations over the policy , it's not so black and white.

In 2008, the league sent a memo to the 30 NBA teams detailing specific guidelines when discussing potential free agents with the media.

The memo read: "If a member of your organization is asked by the media about a potential free agent prior to the July 1 following the last season covered by the player's contract, or about any other person under contract with another NBA team, the only proper response is to decline comment."

Penalties outlined in the memo could include suspension, prohibition of the offending team from hiring the person being tampered with, forfeiture of draft picks and individual and/or team fines of up to $5 million. But obviously, tampering extends past the media. It's about messing with other team's players period, whether that's through the media or through direct contact.

Other owners clearly feel like what Miami did was tampering . Meeting with players to talk about the future, mid-season, even if it's just supposedly about uniform numbers, feels like a violation of the rule. Or players meeting with players to discuss the future for that matter, though Stern said differently on Monday. But even if the league determined it was and levied the maximum $5 million fine against the Heat, I'm thinking Pat Riley would write that check with a big grin on his face. Small price to pay for the King I suppose.

(Read more about the theoretical case against the Heat from Ken Berger here .)

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com