Tag:Tony Battie
Posted on: March 17, 2011 4:22 pm
Edited on: March 17, 2011 4:25 pm
 

Blake Griffin is 'not going to take' hard fouls

Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin is fed up with all the hard fouls. Posted by Ben Golliver.

Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin is a target. Don't believe me? Just watch this video of Andre Miller pancaking Griffin at full speed

The latest incident came on Wednesday night, when Philadelphia 76ers forward Tony Battie and guard Jodie Meeks dragged Griffin down during a transition run out. Griffin received an outlet pass and was gathering to attack the basket on the run when Meeks reached back while flying by in front of him and Battie knocked him off course from behind. The double-whammy caused Griffin to spill to the ground, and Battie's momentum carried him over on top Griffin. Griffin lashed out by pushing Battie off of him and to the ground, while he also tried to untangle himself from a referee who was attempting to intervene. The sequence led to a lot of jawing between the two teams.

Here's video of the hard foul and Griffin's reaction courtesy of YouTube user nbafufu.



The Los Angeles Times notes that Battie was originally assessed a Flagrant Foul 2, which would have meant an automatic ejection, but the officials downgraded it to a Flagrant Foul 1 upon video review.

Either way, the paper noted, Griffin wasn't happy.
"I just felt like they had let things go way too much up to that point. That's what happens when you let things go when they don't call fouls and things like that happen. … And I thought it was ridiculous. So I'm not going to take that. … I've done it too much this season. It got to me."
Griffin's teammate, guard Randy Foye, says Griffin has been getting extra attention from their opponents.
"He was getting hit pretty hard the whole game," Foye said. "He's frustrated. When he goes to the basket, sometimes he feels guys don't go for the ball. He thinks guys just take a whack at him just to let him know not to come down the lane. When he was taking his steps, he was ready to go off one foot. That's why I think he got so upset, and that's why I grabbed him real quick, because I could see how he got up. There was a lot of anger there. You don't want him to get suspended."
Unfortunately for Griffin, when you put as many people on posters as he does, you're going to guys gunning for retribution on a nightly basis. Griffin plays hard, he plays aggressive, he plays above the rim and he's a rookie: that combination will get you every time in the NBA. Battie's play here was more awkward than malicious and it sounds like Griffin's frustration stems more from the accumulation of the attention he receives rather than that single play itself.

It takes awhile for the NBA to adjust to any rookie, but a rookie of Griffin's considerable talents makes that process take even longer. But the book is now out: rough Griffin up, it's your best chance to take him out of his game.
Posted on: December 20, 2010 5:33 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:42 pm
 

Rumor: Magic looking to trade for backup big man

After trading Marcin Gortat to the Phoenix Suns, the Orlando Magic are reportedly searching for a reserve big man to backup Dwight Howard. Posted by Ben Gollivermarcin-gortat


How quickly NBA teams turn from sellers into buyers.  The Orlando Magic, owners of probably the best center depth in the NBA last week, now are stretched thin, incredibly exposed if MVP candidate and starting center Dwight Howard should go down to injury and forced to play small ball when he is on the bench. How did that happen? Two big-time trades this weekend that netted Gilbert Arenas, Jason Richardson and Hedo Turkoglu gave the Magic added offensive firepower and depth on the wings, but came with one large cost: the move of backup center Marcin Gortat to the Phoenix Suns.  Magic executive Otis Smith sounds prepared to address his new-found vulnerability upfront and is reportedly on the prowl for Gortat's replacement already, according to NBA Fanhouse
The Orlando Magic have asked about the availability of both New York's Ronny Turiaf and Philadelphia's Tony Battie, hoping to fill quickly their new void at backup center behind Dwight Howard.
The Magic, according to NBA sources, would like to use backup point guard Chris Duhon as trade bait, but they also would be willing to use small forward Quentin Richardson to get what they want.
Gortat is an agile, physical big man on a reasonable long-term contract and, as we noted on Saturday, he comes out as one of the big winners of the weekend's trade activity, given the large role he will surely take on in the desert now that he is no longer trapped in Dwight Howard's shadow. Replacing him will be no easy task, as Smith is surely well aware.  NBA teams don't often trade big for small without attaching a heavy premium, even when it comes to reserve parts. Turiaf, almost assuredly, will cost Orlando more than they are willing to pay. While Duhon is solid, and capable of playing more minutes than are available in Orlando, it's unlikely that he or Richardson is going to spark a ton of league-wide interest on their own. Aside from dangling Duhon, Smith's options going forward are to settle for a less productive warm body or to consider offering up another trade chip, such as reserve guard J.J. Redick. Like Gortat, Redick is a valuable role-player with a defined NBA skill -- he can shoot the rock from deep -- and he is signed to a reasonable long-term deal, making roughly $6.6 million a year through 2012-2013.  In Orlando, Redick is now fighting for minutes with Arenas, Jason Richardson and Quentin Richardson, so moving him wouldn't be a catastrophic loss. It would make for even more of a rotation overhaul than has already been enacted, but true Dwight Howard Injury Insurance is bound to carry a steep price. Patience wouldn't be the worst thing in the world for Smith, as some time to assess how his first round of moves work out could clarify which of the guards should be the true odd man out. 
 
 
 
 
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