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Tag:Wesley Johnson
Posted on: December 31, 2011 2:00 pm
Edited on: December 31, 2011 2:03 pm
 

Wolves G Lee out 6 weeks after knee surgery

Posted by Ben Gollivermalcolm-lee

One Minnesota Timberwolves rookie guard -- Ricky Rubio -- has gone about lighting up the league. Another is headed for a month and a half of street clothes and rehabilitation.

StarTribune.com reportsthat Timberwolves rookie guard Malcolm Lee had surgery on his left knee and could be sidelined for six weeks.
Wolves rookie guard Malcolm Lee underwent surgery to repair a torn meniscus ligament in his left knee Friday and could miss as much as six weeks. His knee grew sore as training camp progressed. He has surgery to repair the meniscus on the same knee after the college season last March, but this surgery is not related to that one, the team said.

"It's unfortunate for him, but better to get it fixed than wait," coach Rick Adelman said. "He had played very well. We were very pleased with him. We would not have hesitated to play him."

Lee, 21, is a favorite of Timberwolves management and was a target during the 2011 NBA Draft. Minnesota acquired Lee, a UCLA product, in a draft day trade with the Chicago Bulls, who selected him in the second round with the No. 43 pick overall.

With guard Martell Webster out indefinitely because of a recurring back injury, there are some minutes available for Lee, who provides a bigger backcourt option than Rubio or free agent acquisition J.J. Barea. Starting point guard (for now) Luke Ridnour, Rubio, forward Wesley Johnson and guard Wayne Ellington will complete the backcourt rotation until Lee's return.
Posted on: May 11, 2011 3:27 pm
Edited on: May 11, 2011 3:46 pm
 

Griffin, Wall top NBA All-Rookie team

Blake Griffin and John Wall headline the 2010-2011 NBA All-Rookie team. Posted by Ben Golliver.

wall-griffin

The NBA announced its 2010-2011 NBA All-Rookie teams on Wednesday with 2009 No. 1 pick Blake Griffin of the Los Angeles Clippers and 2010 No. 1 pick John Wall of the Washington Wizards leading the way.
Griffin, who was selected first overall in the 2009 NBA Draft but missed the entire 2009-10 season due to injury (stress fracture, left knee), recorded a rookie-and team-leading 22.5 ppg (12th overall), 12.1 rpg (fourth overall) and 63 double-doubles (third overall). Griffin became the first rookie to average at least 20 points and 10 rebounds since Elton Brand (20.1 ppg, 10.0 rpg) in 1999-2000. A six-time T-Mobile Western Conference Rookie of the Month selection, Griffin became the first rookie to appear in an NBA All-Star Game since Yao Ming in 2003. 

Wall, a four-time T-Mobile Eastern Conference Rookie of the Month selection, ranked seventh overall in assists (8.3 apg) and steals (1.75 spg), and finished second among rookies in scoring (16.4 ppg).
The duo was joined on the first team by New York Knicks forward Landry Fields, Sacramento Kings center DeMarcus Cousins and San Antonio Spurs guard Gary Neal. The second team included Detroit Pistons center Greg Monroe, Utah Jazz forward Derrick Favors, Indiana Pacers forward Paul George, Minnesota Timberwolves guard Wesley Johnson and Los Angeles Clippers guard Eric Bledsoe.

Here's a look at both the first and second team rosters and how the voting broke down. 

2010-11 NBA ALL-ROOKIE FIRST TEAM

Blake Griffin   L.A. Clippers   58        
John Wall       Washington    57
Landry Fields   New York       56
DeMarcus Cousins  Sacramento 54
Gary Neal       San Antonio  44      

2010-11 NBA ALL-ROOKIE SECOND TEAM

Greg Monroe     Detroit  42
Wesley Johnson  Minnesota 26
Eric Bledsoe    L.A. Clippers  19
Derrick Favors  Utah  18
Paul George     Indiana 12

Other players receiving votes, with point totals (first place votes in parentheses): Ed Davis, Toronto, 10 (1); Evan Turner, Philadelphia, 12; Jordan Crawford, Washington, 12; Gordon Hayward, Utah, 7; Omer Asik, Chicago, 6 (1); Patrick Patterson, Houston, 5; Al-Farouq Aminu, Los Angeles Clippers, 3; Tiago Splitter, San Antonio, 3; Trevor Booker, Washington, 1; Christian Eyenga, Cleveland, 1; Ekpe Udoh, Golden State, 1.

A few notes:
  • Gary Neal was the only undrafted player to make either the first or second team.
  • Landry Fields was the only second round pick to make either the first or second team.
  • Evan Turner was the only top-5 pick not to make either the first or second team.
  • The highest ranked pick to not receive a single vote was Oklahoma City Thunder big man Cole Aldrich, who was taken No. 11 overall. 
  • Three other top 16 picks -- Xavier Hendry, Larry Sanders and Luke Babbitt, also did not receive a single vote.
  • Three members of the 2010 Kentucky Wildcats -- Wall, Cousins and Bledsoe -- found there way onto the first and second team.
  • The entire first team plus Monroe, Johnson, Bledsoe and Favors competed in the Rookie Challenge at 2011 All-Star Weekend.
  • Of the second team guys, Monroe has the best argument for inclusion on the first team. He started more than half of Detroit's games and was the lone bright spot on a pretty horrific season, posting averages of 9.4 points, 7.5 rebounds and 1.2 steals per game. Still, Cousins posted bigger numbers -- 14.1 points and 8.7 rebounds -- and has the name recognition thing going for him.
Posted on: December 29, 2010 2:31 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:53 pm
 

Timberwolves to pursue O.J. Mayo trade

The Minnesota Timberwolves are reportedly considering a push to trade for Memphis Grizzlies guard O.J. Mayo. Posted by Ben Golliveroj-mayo
CBSSports.com's Ken Berger reports that the Minnesota Timberwolves are considering trading for Memphis Grizzlies guard O.J. Mayo.
CBSSports.com has learned that the Wolves plan to make a push to acquire Memphis guard O.J. Mayo, whose rights they traded to the Grizzlies on draft night in 2008 in the deal that brought Love to Minnesota. Mayo is frustrated coming off the bench in Memphis and "needs a change," according to one person familiar with the situation. The Wolves envision Mayo playing in the backcourt next season alongside Rubio, who according to a person familiar with the situation has given team officials his word that he will join the Wolves next season. The buyout that Minnesota must pay FC Barcelona is down to $1 million, but it's not clear how Rubio's decision could be affected by a lockout. Even if Rubio comes to Minnesota, there's no guarantee he'll thrive immediately.
On the night of the 2008 NBA Draft, the Timberwolves swapped Mayo, who they selected No. 3 overall, to the Memphis Grizzlies for power forward Kevin Love, the No. 5 overall selection as part of a larger 8-player trade . Mayo was one of the most highly-touted high school players of the past decade, but has so far failed to live up to those monstrous expectations as an NBA player. Still, he's a physical, skilled guard who is still on his rookie deal, an intriguing trade target because of his reasonable contract number ($4.5 million this season) and his ability to score and defend two positions in the backcourt.  While Mayo started every game during his first two years in the NBA, he has been used off the bench by the Grizzlies this season. His minutes have taken a big hit -- down from 38 per game in his first two years to 28.8 per game this season -- and his numbers, as you might expect, have dropped across the board. He is averaging 13.1 points, 2.5 assists, 1.8 assists and shooting 42.1% from the field, off his career averages of 17.2 points, 3.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 44.4% shooting. To be frank, the Timberwolves need all the help they can get. At 8-24, they sit in last place in the Northwest Division, and own the second worst record in the Western Conference. They rate 21st in offensive efficiency and 29th in defensive efficiency, and they have a gaping hole at two guard. Forward Michael Beasley has added a scoring punch since the Timberwolves traded for him this summer, but it hasn't been enough to compensate for the team's pathetic backcourt. Mayo would theoretically add a much-needed talent infusion over the team's only true off guard, Wayne Ellington. Minnesota doesn't have much talent or much hope this season, but they do have flexibility to take on salary at the deadline, an uncommon commodity in the NBA that has been exploited well by teams like the Oklahoma City Thunder in recent years. The Timberwolves are in the unique position of not having a single contract over $5 million on their books. (Indeed, the Timberwolves are the only team in the NBA not to carry a single contract over $10 million this seaso n, let alone $5 million.) And, since Minnesota is well under the cap, a trade for Mayo could happen in a variety of ways, including a trade that sends back only future draft considerations rather than a player (and his salary). The Timberwolves also have a glut on the wings, including Corey Brewer, Martell Webster and rookie Wesley Johnson, so if they do make a trade deadline deal(s) it wouldn't be surprising to see one of those guys moved. Here's more from Berger on this week's CBSSports.com's NBA Drive . "I'm told, very interestingly, that the Minnesota Timberwolves that have kind of been in stabilization mode in evaluating the roster are going to explore trading for O.J. Mayo," Berger says. "He's a player they drafted originally in 2008 and sent him to Memphis in the trade that sent Kevin Love to Minnesota. That's something they are going to explore. They are in a little bit of a process now evaluating their roster, but that's a move that they have in mind and that they are going to pursue."
Posted on: October 25, 2010 6:09 pm
 

Martell Webster done for 4-6 weeks.

Wolves wing out 4-6 weeks with herniated disk in back. Posted by Matt Moore

Well, then. What a fine way to start the season in Minny. Minnesota Timberwolves wing Martell Webster, acquired in a trade with Portland which netted them rookie Luke Babbitt, will miss 4-6 weeks after undergoing surgery to repair a herniated disk in his back. The 23-year-old guard averaged 9.4 points and 3.3 rebounds (13.8 and 4.0 per 36 minutes) last season for the Blazers and shot 37% from the arc. He was expected to help tremendously with the Wolves' perimeter shooting and desperate wing situation. Without him, Corey Brewer and rookie Wesley Johnson will get most of the minutes, which should be entertaining, either way.

Brewer actually shot considerably well from the arc towards the end of last year, and with Michael Beasley on board, this doesn't hurt as much as it did. Well, for the Wolves, I mean. Must hurt pretty bad for Webster. Ouch.
Posted on: August 26, 2010 10:31 am
Edited on: August 26, 2010 11:13 am
 

Pop Quiz: Who's the worst?

Posted by Matt Moore

Fall is here, hear the yell, back to school, ring the bell ... The NBA season is right around the corner, and NBA training camp starts in just a few short weeks. To get you ready for the NBA season, we've put together 25 pop quizzes. Pencils ready? We continue our Pop Quizzes with this question...

Who will be the worst team in the NBA this season?


It's a depressing question, isn't it? Who's going to fail more than any other? Someone has to win the fewest number of games this year. So who's on the list?

The Returning Champ: The New Jersey Nets

You can't just let the reigning "champs" off the list without giving them a chance to repeat! The Nets were the worst team in the league last year, only able to avoid the worst mark of all time due to a late surge. It was a startling development, one that baffled a lot of NBA heads, because the team really did have talent. But for whatever reason (injury, chemistry, coaching, pure terrible luck), it never came together and the team plummeted into the depths. So are they doomed to repeat history?

The Nets struck out in free agency for the top names but still brought in good players. Anthony Morrow, Jordan Farmar, Travis Outlaw, and Troy Murphy will all be suiting up for the Nets alongside Devin Harris, Terrence Williams, and Brook Lopez. With the development of the younger players, the addition of a few talented veterans, and a more demanding coach in Avery Johnson, the Nets may not be in position to push for the playoffs, but they are unlikely to repeat as the worst team in the NBA.

The New Kids: The Toronto Raptors


Our first victim of the free-agency summer of doom. After losing Chris Bosh to the triad, GM Brian Colangelo went on a firesale. He ditched Hedo Turkoglu for Leandro Barbosa and sent Marco Belinelli for Julian Wright. He did spend some money, though, giving Amir Johnson a hefty new deal and bringing Linas Kleiza back from overseas. The Raptors lost a huge chunk of salary, and weren't that great to begin with. They are teetering on the abyss. Will they fall off?

Bear in mind that we're talking the worst here. Not bad, but the worst. And the Raptors could assuredly reach that mark if everything were to go wrong. But there are bright spots. Andrea Bargnani, for all his rebound-void, yogurty, forceless  weaknesses, can still hit from anywhere on the floor, and might actually get to play where he's best (high-post and mid-range) with Bosh gone instead of trying to impersonate a traditional center. DeMar DeRozan has the athleticism and range to be able to become a leader. Sonny Weems continues to impress, Amir Johnson will forever be lauded as the next great (whistle) defensive player (whistle) if only he could (whistle) stop fouling (whistle). If the Raptors drop off a cliff, it'll be because the chemistry wasn't fit to hold, or because the real problem in Toronto hasn't been Colangelo's roster, but Triano's coaching.

The Dark Horse: The Washington Wizards


How could any team with John Wall be the worst team in the league? When you have as fragile a chemistry set as this team does. That's how. The Wizards are a long shot to burrow into the trash heap the furthest, but with Gilbert Arenas anything but a sure thing, there's just no telling how this is going to work out. We thought the biggest concern with Arenas last year was if he could stay healthy a full season. We didn't even get to answer that. Andray Blatche is the third best player on the team, and that could go any number of ways. He could be a consistent scorer, working in tandem with Wall, and showcasing the scoring ability he showed last season. Or he could become a space cadet again. JaVale McGee showed great things in Summer League, but he's yet to prove he can be someone to be relied on as the primary big.

Wall is likely to be good enough to drag this team out of the very basement, and if everything were to go right (and I mean everything), the Wizards could find themselves in contention for the playoffs. But if another chemistry blow-up happens and Flip Saunders is unable to contain the damage and get through, the Wizards could be a two-year disaster.

The Favorite: The Minnesota Timberwolves


Okay, let's try the opposite. Let's try and figure out how the Wolves could avoid being the worst team in the league. Option No. 1, another team has a rash of injuries that makes Houston seem like Phoenix. Okay, barring that, Option No.2, we need the following to occur:

A. Luke Ridnour picks up where he left off in Milwaukee, being a solid game manager and reliable shooter.
B. Martell Webster slides in and immediately begins to contribute as he did in Portland, providing the perimeter scoring missing in Minny last year.
C. Wesley Johnson was in fact, the best player available at 3, better or at least within range of DeMarcus Cousins only without the chemistry problems, and is able to pick up the pro game's speed and awareness necessary to contribute.
D. Jonny Flynn recovers on schedule from hip surgery.
E. Kurt Rambis and David Kahn get over whatever problems they had with Kevin Love last season, and Love is allowed to be on the floor and become the player everyone else believes he is.
F. Darko Milicic actually was worth five years and $20 million, and alongside Love makes for a stout front court.
G. The triangle, one of the more complex and difficult systems to run, which has only been successful for two teams under one coach with the best or second best player in the league at all times, magically works for a lottery team lacking in both veteran smarts and talent.
H. Mike Beasley really was just misunderstood.

That's a lot that needs to go right. Wolves fans tend to think the media picks on them because of their market. As a proponent of small markets, I'm here to say that's not the case. It's because this team is bad. It was built badly, with bad contracts for bad players, with a bad system for its personnel, and it needs significant upgrades at nearly every position and at multiple depth levels in order to make itself right. The Wolves could come together and shove it in the faces of all the doubters. But until we see the actual manifestation of all the supposed potential the roster holds, your Minnesota Timberwolves are expected to be the worst team in the NBA this season.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com