Tag:trade demands
Posted on: January 2, 2012 12:07 pm
Edited on: January 2, 2012 2:50 pm
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Kings say they will not trade DeMarcus Cousins



By Matt Moore


UPDATE: According to SI.com, the Cousins will re-join the Kings on their upcoming road trip to Memphis and Denver.

Despite the explosive situation between DeMarcus Cousins and head coach Paul Westphal, Kings ownership says it will not trade the temperamental but talented young power forward, ownership told the Sacramento Bee.
"We leave that stuff (the benching) to the basketball people," Kings co-owner Joe Maloof said before tipoff, "but we're not trading him."
via Ailene Voisin: Situation is 'tip of the iceberg,' coach says, so where is the rest? - Sacramento Sports - Kings, 49ers, Raiders, High School Sports | Sacramento Bee.

The Kings not trading Cousins is the proper path. There's absolutely no way to get adequate value after releasing a statement of the nature of Westphal's. They have a player they don't feel they can control, and with Cousins' talent, they can't simply dump him off, especially with the struggles of the team thus far this season.

As for Westphal, he spoke to reporters prior to the Kings' game against the Hornets. Kings blog Cowbell Kingdom has video, and the comments are pretty interesting.



Something that stands out here, is this quote from Westphal (transcribed by Cowbell Kingdom):
“Well, it’s interesting that he told me before he told his agent, but he told me twice. So it’s silly to have the agent deny it just because he didn’t get a call before DeMarcus talked to me that’s the easiest one of all to answer.”
Westphal is explicitly claiming that the trade request was legitimate and that Cousins simply hasn't informed his agent, rather than his agent's interpretation, which is that Cousins was saying, in effect, "If that's the situation, then trade me" which is different from a trade demand. We're talking semantics here, but they're important on all sides. 

It's also notable that Westphal says that to solve the situation, Cousins needs to do some soul searching. There's explicitly no claim of responsbility for the situation on Westphal's part. Which, if the situation is as bad as Westphal claims it is, isn't necessarily a fault. But it sets the table for how this situation is developing, which is that the coach feels this is all on the back of Cousins and not a two-way communication issue.

Tom Ziller at SBNation.com notes that the fact that the Kings did not suspend Cousins, instead just "sending him home," speaks to how the organization is being run. A suspension escalates the situation as it restricts his pay and can be appealed by the NBPA.

After this many incidents, however, at some point the Kings are going to have to face the situation head-on. Either Cousins is a part of the team's long-term future, or Westphal is. Because its hard to see either Cousins or Westphal changing their path at this point. It's not resolving itself, and even if Cousins is lacking in maturity, painting him into a corner this way isn't going to do anything to foster an environment of growth. Cousins may be too much of a problem to keep, but he's too talented to let go.

The Kings, for the moment, are stuck.

Here's reaction to the situation from Kings players after the game, courtesy of Cowbell Kingdom. There's a wide range of comments here, with the Kings players showing the kind of professionalism that Cousins needs to learn, even if Westphal is handling the situation badly (which is certainly up for interpretation). Yahoo Sports reports that Kings players have been irritated with Cousins' behavior for some time, with one source calling him "a bully."


Posted on: January 2, 2012 12:05 pm
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Posted on: January 2, 2012 12:02 pm
 

Kings say they will not trade DeMarcus Cousins

By Matt Moore

Despite the explosive situation between DeMarcus Cousins and head coach Paul Westphal, Kings ownership says it will not trade the temperamental but talented young power forward, ownership told the Sacramento Bee.
"We leave that stuff (the benching) to the basketball people," Kings co-owner Joe Maloof said before tipoff, "but we're not trading him."
via Ailene Voisin: Situation is 'tip of the iceberg,' coach says, so where is the rest? - Sacramento Sports - Kings, 49ers, Raiders, High School Sports | Sacramento Bee.

The Kings not trading Cousins is the proper path. There's absolutely no way to get adequate value after releasing a statement of the nature of Westphal's. They have a player they don't feel they can control, and with Cousins' talent, they can't simply dump him off, especially with the struggles of the team thus far this season.

As for Westphal, he spoke to reporters prior to the Kings' game against the Hornets. Kings blog Cowbell Kingdom has video, and the comments are pretty interesting.



Something that stands out here, is this quote from Westphal (transcribed by Cowbell Kingdom):
“Well, it’s interesting that he told me before he told his agent, but he told me twice. So it’s silly to have the agent deny it just because he didn’t get a call before DeMarcus talked to me that’s the easiest one of all to answer.”
Westphal is explicitly claiming that the trade request was legitimate and that Cousins simply hasn't informed his agent, rather than his agent's interpretation, which is that Cousins was saying, in effect, "If that's the situation, then trade me" which is different from a trade demand. We're talking semantics here, but they're important on all sides. 

It's also notable that Westphal says that to solve the situation, Cousins needs to do some soul searching. There's explicitly no claim of responsbility for the situation on Westphal's part. Which, if the situation is as bad as Westphal claims it is, isn't necessarily a fault. But it sets the table for how this situation is developing, which is that the coach feels this is all on the back of Cousins and not a two-way communication issue.

Tom Ziller at SBNation.com notes that the fact that the Kings did not suspend Cousins, instead just "sending him home," speaks to how the organization is being run. A suspension escalates the situation as it restricts his pay and can be appealed by the NBPA.

After this many incidents, however, at some point the Kings are going to have to face the situation head-on. Either Cousins is a part of the team's long-term future, or Westphal is. Because its hard to see either Cousins or Westphal changing their path at this point. It's not resolving itself, and even if Cousins is lacking in maturity, painting him into a corner this way isn't going to do anything to foster an environment of growth. Cousins may be too much of a problem to keep, but he's too talented to let go.

The Kings, for the moment, are stuck.

Here's reaction to the situation from Kings players after the game, courtesy of Cowbell Kingdom. There's a wide range of comments here, with the Kings players showing the kind of professionalism that Cousins needs to learn, even if Westphal is handling the situation badly (which is certainly up for interpretation). Yahoo Sports reports that Kings players have been irritated with Cousins' behavior for some time, with one source calling him "a bully."

Posted on: February 16, 2011 4:41 pm
Edited on: February 16, 2011 4:43 pm
 

Melo can't have it both ways

Carmelo Anthony has been under a lot of stress with all the media attention for something he had no part in. Wait, no, he had total part in it. Nevermind. 
Posted by Matt Moore

Carmelo Anthony is starting to tick me off. 

Throughout this entire debacle, there's been little to argue with when it comes to how Anthony has conducted himself. After all, he's played to his usual standard of excellence, helped the Nuggets firmly into the playoff race, hasn't openly demanded nor discussed a trade, and has, at least on the surface, done his part to try and not let the whole circus act disrupt his team. He's not flipping out in the locker room after losses or giving out false promises to the Denver fans. He's been steady, calm, cool, and collected. 

But now? Now he's starting to buy into the machine a bit and he's getting further and further from the reality.

From the AP:

Anthony said he's ready for a resolution, even though he insists he's not fretting about what might happen as the Feb. 24 trade deadline approaches. 
"I know something will have to happen whether I sign the extension or whether the Nuggets move me or whatever," said Anthony, who is averaging 24.9 points per game this year. "Something is going to happen, so I try not to stress myself out about it." 
That doesn't mean he can avoid the hours upon hours of coverage devoted to one of the NBA's biggest stars. He said he can "see" all the rumors out there, no longer needing to turn on the television in his hotel room. 
"I turn on the TV, and I turn it right back off because it's always something, it's always a new team, always a rumor, always this person saying that, that person saying this," he said. "I try not to pay attention to it." 
It isn't easy. He acknowledged his thoughts keep turning to a murky future that he hopes begins to clear in a few days. But first, he'll have to get past at least one more major session with the media over the All-Star break. 
"I know they're going to be looking to talk to me. And I'm going to be in L.A. for the All-Star weekend and every media outlet is going to be there, so it's going to be a 'MeloWatch,' I guess," he said.
via Nuggets' Anthony ready for end to 'MeloWatch' - NBA - CBSSports.com Basketball.

See, now, Melo, you've lost the sympathy card. Why? Because you tried to play it. The Knicks didn't start this. The Nuggets didn't start this. Anthony, and his handlers started this. Anthony was offered an extension early last summer by the Nuggets. If he wanted to avoid scrutiny, avoid the media asking questions, avoid the attention that comes with a trade request, then he shouldn't have made one. Sign the extension and all that goes away. He's a Nugget, their star, and he's not going anywhere. Case closed. But Anthony wanted to play somewhere else. And that's fine. He's in a position to negotiate his way out before the CBA. In fact, giving the Nuggets a heads up so they can get something of value back versus the scraps Toronto and Cleveland got this summer was actually doing them a favor. 

But there are consequences to our decisions. If Anthony wants to go to a big market where he'll get more attention and be more strongly considered as a star by the New York media, that's his choice, and he's entitled to it. But he's not entitled to have his cake and eat it too. Or, given that he wants to sign an extension, and be traded, and not have to deal with the media hounding him, he needs to realize he can't have his cake, eat it, and not have to deal with the weight gain. You can't have it both ways, Melo. You want to be a star? You want to make a trade demand? That's up to you. But the consequence is that people are going to ask you about it, because they want to know. And even though the media will get criticized for over-covering the story, it's you who started this chain of events. 

The next logical response is to say that Melo didn't publicly demand a trade, that he made it in secret. Do you really think the Denver Nuggets received a trade request from Anthony or his people and then decided to leak it? What possible incentive do they have to losing that kind of leverage. Masai Ujiri hasn't exactly handled this thing beautifully, but he hasn't bungled it like that. It was Anthony's people who leaked this, to apply pressure to Denver. And that's fine, that's the best way to get what their client wants. But again, you don't get to then play the pity card, or take your hat off to yourself, or act like you're dealing adversity this year because of it. 

Anthony lost his sister this year. That's something terribly rough to deal with. He came back and played like an All-Star. He deserves to be commended for that. He's kept his head up on the floor through this losing streak and not freaked out on the team. He hasn't spouted off at the media, which, yes, can get annoying. But he also has no high ground in this conversation. 

In the muck of The Great Melo Mudfight of 2010-2011, Anthony was the first one with soil on his hands. 

(For the latest on the situation Melo himself created and doesn't want, check out Ken Berger's Post-Ups where Donnie Walsh is amused by all the Melo Panic.)
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com