Tag:Houston Rockets
Posted on: October 29, 2010 1:12 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:13 pm

Golden State Warriors sale delayed again

The sale of the Golden State Warriors has reportedly been delayed again. Posted by Ben Gollivermonta-ellis The Golden State Warriors have been known, first and foremost, for their insane pace, eschewing defense for run-and-gun fun. But when it comes to the franchise's sale, things are moving glacially. Matt Steinmetz of CSNBayArea.com reports that Joe Lacob, who agreed to purchase the Warriors from previous owner Chris Cohan over the summer, will not officially complete the transaction and transfer of power on Friday, as previously expected. 
Well, turns out Joe Lacob isn’t going to be the owner of the Warriors by Friday, which was something NBA commissioner David Stern had wanted.   Looks like it’s going to be November.  
Steinmetz also notes that the official deadline for the deal is Dec. 31, but that eveything appears to be "on track."   Speaking of on track, the Warriors started the season off in impressive fashion, running past the Houston Rockets 132-128, thanks to a career-high 46 points from guard Monta Ellis.  It's now been three and a half months since the sale agreement was announced as "official." If only Ellis could help Lacob get this process back in the fast lane. 
Posted on: October 27, 2010 1:55 am
Edited on: October 27, 2010 2:38 am

Lakers' poise overcomes Rockets' hard work

Lakers overcome tough contest by Rockets thanks to Shannon Brown as Kobe struggles from the field.
Posted by Matt Moore

The Rockets worked hard. They hustled. They shot well. They drove, and dished. They gave up offensive boards, but they worked on defense. They forced Kobe Bryant into a hard night. They gave everything they had for three quarters.

And it only took one quarter for the Lakers to show why they're the champs. After the Rockets led by as many as 15 in the second half, the Lakers made a furious comeback behind an explosive performance from Shannon Brown, then iced it with a Steve Blake three with less than twenty seconds to go. Brown went ballistic in the third with a barrage of threes and finished with 16 points. With one last possesion and less than ten seconds, Steve Blake made a terrific defensive stop on Aaron Brooks under the basket and the Lakers walked out with a 112-110 win.

Take a look at Shannon Brown's shot chart from our CBSSports.com GameTracker :

The Rockets had solid performances from Kevin Martin in the loss, with 26 points. Aaron Brooks, outside of that last possession, was also brilliant with 24 points and 9 assists. The key for the Rockets? Turnovers. 19 turnovers to LA's 11.

Yao Ming was held to his 24-minute limit, fouling out in the 24th minute, exactly. That's one way to get the most for your minutes. Yao was great early, fighting off Pau Gasol and grabbing rebounds, but Lamar Odom decided to show for LA, and when that happens, they're impossible to stop. 14 points, 10 rebounds for the Space Cadet, and a 112-110 win for the Lakers.

Kobe Bryant was 8 of 20 from the field for 27 points, but did have 5 rebounds and 7 assists. More on #24 in tomorrow's GameChanger.

Posted on: October 25, 2010 9:52 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:03 pm

Joey Dorsey discusses cousin's kidnap and murder

Toronto Raptors forward Joey Dorsey opens up about the kidnapping and murder of his cousin in West Baltimore. Posted by Ben Golliverjoey-dorsey It's not every day an NBA player decides to open up to a reporter about a family member's death, but that's what happened recently, when bruising Toronto Raptors forward Joey Dorsey poured his heart out to Holly MacKenzie of The Score. Dorsey, a native of West Baltimore, one of the most crime-ridden places in the United States, describes playing at the D-League showcase last January, trying to impress scouts and Houston Rockets GM Daryl Morey. After a particularly strong outing, Dorsey received a call from an assistant coach who passed on his regrets for Dorsey's loss.  Unfortunately, Dorsey didn't know what the coach was talking about. At least not yet.
He didn’t know what was happening, and after the coach hung up the phone suddenly, Dorsey immediately called his mother in a panic. When he got her on the phone, his mother first tried to hide the pain from her son, pretending nothing had happened. Not on this weekend, not when he had so much to prove. After Dorsey told her about the call from the assistant coach, his mother broke down. Dorsey takes a breath before revealing the tragedy he found out about that day. “My mom started crying. My cousin had got kidnapped and killed.” The impact hit Dorsey immediately. “It’s very hard for me to trust anybody. I really don’t go back home like that. It’s just like, ‘What am I doing going back home for if they killed him?’” After that, Dorsey shut himself off even more. “I really don’t let people get close to me anymore or anything like that. My mom says you should stop shutting people out of your life, so coming up here, this is good for me. An outdoor place, I can walk around, have friends and have fun. I’m cool with it up here.”
Dorsey's immediate NBA future hangs in the balance, as he is the 15th man on the Raptors roster. Final cuts come today. After reading MacKenzie's full piece, which describes Dorsey's growing affection for Toronto and his relationship with his mother, who worked two jobs to support him by herself and traveled by Greyhound bus to attend his college games in Memphis, it's impossible not to root for him to stick.
Posted on: October 20, 2010 2:58 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 7:56 pm

Chuck Hayes out for preseason with ankle sprain

Houston Rockets forward Chuck Hayes has suffered an ankle injury that will keep him until opening night. Posted by Ben Golliverchuck-hayes Sam Amick of AOL Fanhouse reports on Twitter that Houston Rockets forward Chuck Hayes has suffered an ankle injury that will keep him out of the Rockets' final two preseason games.  Those two games are a Texas two-step, as Houston travels to San Antonio to face the Spurs Thursday night and to Dallas to take on the Mavericks on Friday night. Marc Spears reports on Twitter that it is a "mild to moderate sprain" so one would expect Hayes will be ready to go on opening night. The Rockets open the regular season in Los Angeles to face the Lakers on Oct. 26. Hayes had played in all six of Houston's preseason games to date, and had averaged 6.0 points and 5.0 rebounds in 21.7 minutes per game. The Rockets have been spreading around the minutes during the preseason, in part because franchise center Yao Ming is on a strict minute limit. Indeed, Jason Friedman of Rockets.com reports on Twitter that coach Rick Adelman plans to hold Ming out of Thursday's game against the Spurs.  This should be a good chance for some of Houston's younger players, like second-year power forward Jordan Hill or rookie forward Patrick Patterson, to see some more court time in Hayes's absence. 
Posted on: October 18, 2010 5:06 pm

The 2007 class, the new CBA and extensions

Posted by Royce Young

There are two weeks until Nov. 1. That day doesn't mean much to most, unless it's your birthday or your anniversary (you're welcome for the reminder). But for the draft class of 2007, it's an important day. A very important day. And one that looks like it will come and go without much fanfare.

As of today, Oct. 18, only two players from the class of 2007 have received a contract extension. Kevin Durant who was given a max deal over the summer and Joakim Noah who Chicago inked to a pretty hefty contract. Other than that, no one else. The No. 1 overall pick Greg Oden? Doesn't look like he's getting paid. Other top 10 picks like Mike Conley, Jeff Green, Yi Jianlian, Brandan Wright and Corey Brewer? They probably aren't going to have anything done. Only Al Horford, who is likely to get extended by Atlanta, has a shot of doing something before Nov. 1, though David Aldridge of NBA.com says it's "50-50" at this point.

(If nothing is done by Nov. 1, then the remaining un-extended players become restricted free agents for next summer. Just in case that wasn't clear up front.)

Other than Oden who the Blazers aren't extending for obvious reasons, probably the two most interesting cases are Jeff Green of the Thunder and Aaron Brooks of the Rockets.

As for Green, Aldridge thinks that the book might not be closed on an extension for the player Thunder fans call "Uncle Jeff". In his Morning Tip column, Aldridge says, "Green could certainly argue he deserves a new deal after averaging 15.1 points and six rebounds a game last season for the emerging Thunder. And Green's agent, David Falk, has a way of persuading teams to see things his client's way, so Green's status may change by the deadline. Oklahoma City's plan has been to keep its powder dry until its young core group came on line for new deals."

The problem for Green though is his teammate. No not, that Kevin Durant guy. It's his other soon-to-be-a-star teammate, Russell Westbrook. Next summer, Westbrook is eligible for his contract extension. And much like the way the Thunder treated Durant by showing up at his door at midnight, Westbrook will likely be inked on the spot. That complicates things for Green.

Nobody really knows his true market value quite yet, just like nobody really knows exactly where he should be playing. Is he a $10 million per year player? More? Less? It's hard to say at this point. And that might be why the Thunder's likely willing to let him walk into restricted free agency. This season is big in determining that value. It's a risk for the Thunder though. There are a lot of dumb general managers out there and one is likely willing to overpay Green because he's a pretty good player playing third or maybe even fourth fiddle on a good team. Someone could very easily put $11 or $12 million a year under Green's nose.

If Green wants a lot of money, then Oklahoma City might not be able to pay him. As of now, both GM Sam Presti and Green are saying the right things. Green says he's not worried about it and that's why he has representation. He said at media day that he'll let it happen when it does. And Presti said he's had "positive discussions" with Green, but won't say anything other than that.

As for Brooks, it's already been made clear he's not likely getting extended. As the reigning Most Improved Player and a guy that's potentially a star caliber talent, he's a little miffed over it. But GM Daryl Morey doesn't want to extend Brooks for a lot of the same reasons Presti doesn't want to lock in Green. It's not to say either GM doesn't want to keep their guys, it's just that they don't want to overpay without knowing completely what they have. Plus, the looming CBA negotiations are hanging overhead and it makes it tough to just hang a big multi-year extension in front of anyone and everyone. It's fiscal responsibility, but at the same time, risky behavior because you may have to pay more to keep your man next summer. Interesting dynamic there.

With this class looking at two and probably three extensions, a small trend is developing. The 2006 class had six extensions (Andrea Bargnani, Brandon Roy, LaMarcus Aldridge, Thabo Sefolosha, Renaldo Balkman, Rajon Rondo). The 2005 group had eight (Andrew Bogut, Chris Paul, Deron Williams, Andrew Bynum, Danny Granger, Jason Maxiell, Francisco Garcia and Martell Webster). 2004 had six (Dwight Howard, Devin Harris, Al Jefferson, Kris Humphries, Jameer Nelson and Kevin Martin, but the all-time great class of 2003 had 15 (LeBron, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh, etc.). Either the talent has dropped a bit or GMs are just a little tighter with those extensions. It's probably a combination of both. And of course, that darn CBA.

(As an example though, out of that 2006 class, some players that got restricted free agent contracts but not extensions: Rudy Gay, Luis Scola, Ronnie Brewer and Tyrus Thomas. So just because someone isn't extended that doesn't mean they won't get paid big and/or stay with their current club.)

But then again, would you extend Thaddeus Young, Yi, Rodney Stuckey, Jared Dudley, Spencer Hawes, Rudy Fernandez, Al Thornton or Nick Young? (Interestingly, Ernie Grunfeld has the opportunity to do so on like half the 2007 class.) It's not exactly a group that screams multi-year, multi-million dollar contract.

Though it appears we may be in a new climate for contract extensions and it's something the 2008 class (Derrick Rose, Michael Beasley, Westbrook, O.J. Mayo, Kevin Love, etc.) will likely have an eye on. The new CBA will determine a lot of these players' future. So Nov. 1 will probably just have to come and go while they wait to see what happens next summer.
Posted on: October 13, 2010 12:18 pm
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Posted on: October 13, 2010 10:22 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 7:47 pm

Yao Ming takes baby step back to normal in China

Houston Rockets center Yao Ming shows nicely in an NBA preseason exhibition game against the New Jersey Nets in Beijing, China.

Posted by Ben Golliver.

Pardon my pessimism, but the early reports regarding Houston’s plan to impose a strict playing time limit on center Yao Ming, who is returning from a lengthy rehabilitation after undergoing foot surgery, had me spooked. A body that big with a base that potentially fragile is a ticking time bomb, and it’s one that comes with any number of psychological hurdles to go along with the physical ones. Watching Yao play well in Houston's 91-81 exhibition win over the New Jersey Nets on Wednesday morning in Beijing, then, came as a pleasant surprise.

Yao’s first-half play was solid, noteworthy for the smoothness of his gait and his activity level on both ends. On offense, Yao extended out to the three-point line to set high screens with ease and he extended smoothly to provide help defense as well. As is often the case during preseason, the game was an up-and-down affair with plenty of quick triggers. Yao kept pace with mobile Nets center Brook Lopez, one of the league's best young big men, thanks in part to the relatively short length of his stints in both the first and second quarters.

It was during the first six minutes of the third quarter that Yao really distinguished himself. He drew two quick fouls on Houston defenders, hit a 20 foot face-up jumper, and continued to effortlessly set high screens for point guard Aaron Brooks. He was perhaps even better defensively, playing the passing lanes to grab a steal, starting transition play with two outlet passes and positioning his body effectively to defend and frustrate Lopez on the low block. Although he appeared to tire slightly and didn’t commit to rebounding on every possession, his impact was unmistakeable.

Yao’s third-quarter run ended with a thud, as he bowled over Nets guard Devin Harris, who cheekily stepped in front of his path in transition, and came crashing to the court. Man down! Cue panic response. But Yao rose quickly and with a wry smile, clearly disagreeing with the player control foul but not letting it spoil his good humor.

Taken together -- his movement, his mood -- it's fair to call Yao’s 9 points, 4 rebounds, 1 assist, and 2 steals effort in 18 minutes a baby step back to normal.

Posted on: October 7, 2010 11:30 am

Video: Dwight Howard learns from his sensai

Posted by Royce Young

Last season, Kobe Bryant made some headlines because he spent time working with Hakeem Olajuwon. And once people saw the dividends of Bryant's work with Hakeem (for instance, Kobe scored in post-ups more than most power forwards or centers - it's true, I have a Synergy account) there was one question most had: Why in the heck is Dwight Howard not doing the exact same thing?

Well, question answered. Because as Howard put it, he's now learning from Master Splinter.

My first thought is, "How good does Hakeem still look? My goodness, I feel like he could still be good today." My second one is, "If Dwight Howard actually starts getting some of this stuff, oh my."

Olajuwon showed Howard a few staple moves and if you watch, it's all about footwork. Hakeem's is legendary and most credit that to him playing soccer, not basketball, growing up. Howard doesn't have bad footwork. It's more about his touch. But good feet and sharp moves can eliminate a lot of the need for good touch around the basket. Sometimes you make a move so good it's almost impossible not to score.

There's only so much Howard can take from three days of training with The Dream. But that's a whole heck of a lot more knowledge than he had before. Howard may be somewhat transformed this year, but that comes down to him taking the principles he learned with him and continuing to work on them. He can't expect three days of training to make him into Hakeem Olajuwon.

But if Howard starts getting even a little bit of it? Again, oh my.
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com