Tag:Kevin Garnett
Posted on: October 15, 2010 2:55 pm
 

Shaq shares his thoughts on technical fouls

Posted by Royce Young

Not a ton of people are loving the new technical foul rules that enforce a quicker whistle. In fact, some may even feel it's "stupid." One such large player (in more ways than one) also doesn't love the new quick whistle and of course, this player isn't shy.

Shaquille O'Neal talked to reporters today and shared his feelings on the new stricter rule:
"I just think that if you give those guys that much control you might as well start selling their jerseys at Footlocker. This is an emotional game. I know when I pay the money to different arenas and I take my sons and my daughters, I want to see everything. I want to see them talking smack, I want to see it all. You can’t try to just cut off an emotional game — expect people not to have emotion.

“[I'll] say that you can probably cut out the secondary and the third emotion, but if you hit me with this mic right here, like this, I’m gonna at least go, ‘Whoa, what you doing?’ I can’t just let you hit me with the mic and just keep talking, ‘Yeah, everything’s good, I love Toronto,’ you know what I’m saying? I’ve got to at least have that, ‘What are you doing?’ I think they [should] give us room to respectfully react once, sometimes maybe twice. Matter of fact, just keep it like the way it was.”

“The other night, I don’t think KG did anything to get tossed out. Like I said, [you're] going to give them that much control you might as well start selling their jerseys. Might as well make them stars.”

Fine coming in 3, 2, 1...

There's definitely two sides to this issue. One says, "Come on. You can control what you do. I understand an emotional outburst but it makes no sense to keep talking and complaining. Just walk away!" The other says, "Basketball is an emotional game and players get caught up in it. Part of the game is working officials and it's impossible for them to stay consistent with these calls."

Me personally, I don't mind smack talking, but watching a player whine after every call gets really old and annoying (I'm looking at you , Tim Duncan Face.) I think the NBA realizes how it makes the game look like a whiner sport. The way the rule is laid out, it says you can react, but don't carry on. Doesn't that seem fair? Players have the opportunity to let out the uncontrolled outburst, but they just need to zip it and get over it shortly thereafter.

More than likely, the NBA will cave and relax the rules. They've tried this kind of enforcement before, but it didn't hold up. They've got to stick to it if they want it to work. And I hope they didn't just use preseason to really emphasize it only to back off in the regular season. Give this half a season and players will start shaping up. Let a guy pick up a big technical late in a game and maybe he'll think twice about badgering an official for an extended time.

I do kind of like Shaq's line about selling the referree's jerseys. It's pretty annoying when an official inserts himself into a game and tries to prove a point. I agree there. And I guess that's what the heart of this debate is.

But I don't know Shaq, I can't really say I'd be in the market for a Bill Kennedy replica jersey. Not my thing, I guess.

Posted on: October 14, 2010 9:50 pm
 

The Union decides tantrums is the hill to die on

Player's Union intends to file suit against league for rule regarding player's acting like four-year-olds.
Posted by Matt Moore




Tantrums. That's apparently what the NBA's Player's Union feels is the hill to push litigation over . Not a better pension plan, or fewer regular season games, or even revenue sharing, apparently. They're going to pursue litigation over their right to stomp and yell and scream and curse the officials who are only doing their jobs. Because, really, when you think about it, that's what the Union needs most of all.

Perhaps you were curious about what the union is actually saying. Here's their press release, courtesy of KB:

The new unilateral rule changes are an unnecessary and unwarranted overreaction on the league’s behalf. We have not seen any increase in the level of “complaining” to the officials and we believe that players as a whole have demonstrated appropriate behavior toward the officials. Worse yet, to the extent the harsher treatment from the referees leads to a stifling of the players’ passion and exuberance for their work, we fear these changes may actually harm our product. The changes were made without proper consultation with the Players Association, and we intend to file an appropriate legal challenge.

Let's go through this line by line, in the most often-replicated-never-really-dupli
cated
way possible, shall we?

"The new unilateral rule changes are an unnecessary and unwarranted overreaction on the league’s behalf."

Unnecessary. An ironic word to use since, considering no referee has ever reversed a call on the basis of a player's complaint, the complaint in and of itself is unnecessary. So the rule to prevent unnecessary actions is unnecessary, which would of course make the complaints necessary, but they of course are not necessary. Now, that's some faulty logic, but the point's still the same. The rule is necessary. It's how it's execute that you can argue may not be.

"We have not seen any increase in the level of 'complaining' to the officials and we believe that players as a whole have demonstrated appropriate behavior toward the officials. "

I'll believe there's been no increase, but that doesn't mean the level is appropriate. Because it's not. Watch Tim Duncan. Or Kobe Bryant. Or even Kendrick Perkins. Or, you know, Kevin Garnett (or look at the gigantic picture above). Even Celtics fans complained about how much the team complained last year. But maybe that's just an accent thing.

"Worse yet, to the extent the harsher treatment from the referees leads to a stifling of the players’ passion and exuberance for their work, we fear these changes may actually harm our product."

This as opposed to players taking games off in the middle of the season because they're "bored" or the fact that officials being influenced towards not calling fouls leads to a physical game like existed in the late 90's, AKA the most boring brand of basketball on the planet. But whatevs. The players are clearly worried about the product. That's why they're so easy to coach.

"The changes were made without proper consultation with the Players Association, and we intend to file an appropriate legal challenge."

Right, because the change wasn't discussed for weeks and the players weren't given a heads up on it. That's how that went down. It was a sneak attack! Like Pearl Harbor, only with Kevin Garnett being ejected for yelling and screaming!

I tend to side with the Union on most issues, including those regarding the upcoming CBA and the essential need for a better revenue sharing model. But to pick this as the issue they want to sue over in a season with as many issues to discuss as this one is absurd. Just tell your guys to chill out and go play.
Posted on: October 14, 2010 1:44 pm
Edited on: October 14, 2010 2:11 pm
 

The tree of complaint, KG, and you

For the love of Stern, can we relax about the new tech rules?
Posted by Matt Moore


In the beginning, there was complaining.

It's pretty natural, really. You're body-to-body, struggling, fighting, adrenaline rushing, and the whistle blows. You can't possibly think you did anything that could be considered a foul (especially not after how you were just elbowed at the other end of the floor!) and so you complain. It probably wasn't all that bad in the beginning, a hundred years ago.

It is now.

Then, there was the complaining about the complaining. And lost in this newest wave of outrage is the fact that there genuinely was a great deal of complaining about the complaining. Casual NBA fans? They loathe what they see when there's a whistle. Grown men, professionals, whooping and hollering, badgering officials, acting like they've just been stubbed on the toe by a whistle. Most of the time for a foul that was pretty easy to call. It reflects poorly on the game and every time it happens, a friend will point and say "that's why I don't follow the NBA." As if that were to somehow overtake the athleticism, the tactics, the chemistry, the powerful emotion of the game. But it does. It reflects poorly on the game.

So the NBA decided to do something about it, finally.

And now, finally, we've reached the zenith of this ridiculous story. There's now complaining about the rules designed to help with all the complaints about the complaining.

Welcome to the Catch-22, David Stern. Have fun trying to make people happy who cannot be made so.

Last night in a meaningless exhibition game, Jermaine O'Neal was whistled for a bad technical foul. At least, that's what it seemed like to the camera's eye, which is what everyone uses (we'll get into how that's a flawed start in a minute). It certainly didn't seem like O'Neal was worthy of a technical foul. It was a bad call, the same kind of bad call that's been made since the invention of the modern game and will be made for as long as officials are human. As Ken Berger of CBSSports.com reported last night , it's probably an issue with both sides trying to find where the line exists.

Kevin Garnett? That was not a bad call. I understand that the paying fans at Madison Square Garden didn't come to see Garnett ejected. I get that we want players like KG to be able to play with emotion, with their passionate hearts on their sleeves. You're absolutely right that emotion is a pivotal part of the game's heart.

What Garnett was doing? What he usually does? It's not. It's intimidation at worst, and overreaction in the least, and he needed to be tossed under the new rules. Arguing the call by trying to show the foul, that's debatable. If he was calm, cool, and collected, then the first technical would have been completely wrong. Let me ask you this:

When was the last time you saw or heard of Kevin Garnett being calm, cool, and collected on a basketball court?

We have no idea what he said to the officials, and that's the biggest problems here. He could have said "Good sir! I heartily object, and though I respect your opinion, I was wondering if we might discuss the issue for a brief moment!" We don't know.  We're reacting based on microphone muted interpretations of what we see on screen, without a clue of what was actually said by these players. I'd imagine if the officials were able to come out and say what the players said to them, we might feel differently. We'd also probably feel differently about the players, and that's not something the NBA wants at all. For all the talk today about how the league is victimizing the poor players, they could just mike up everything, let the profanity be released in a transcript, and then see how those endorsement dollars come rolling in.

But, no. We side with the athlete because it's his work we appreciate. His work, being the key phrase there. These are professionals. They always want to talk about that. How they are professionals and deserve to be paid as such. That they'll switch teams because they're professionals or hold out because they are professionals or don't care about the fans because they're professionals. But they can't control themselves on the floor? We're talking most often about guys who are 25 years of age or older. Grown men, who can't control their own reactions to something they know won't change no matter what they say or do? Do you think Kendrick Perkins screaming "What?!" or Tim Duncan's eyes bulging or Kobe Bryant making faces will actually convince a referee to say "Oh, you know what? When you put it that way, you're right. You didn't foul him. I'm sorry. Let me change this call."? No. The calls won't change. It's just complaining for complaining's sake, or it's an attempt to influence the outcome by pressuring officials. And that's a serious problem.

You don't want to go down that road, and it's one that gets tread upon a lot in an NBA season. It's not an epidemic, but it's enough to want to force the players to pump the breaks. It's the same as Phil Jackson flexing his muscle in press conferences. Last night, after the first technical, Kevin Garnett had to be restrained by another teammate from coming at the official. He wasn't going to hurt him. He wasn't going to do anything but scream and yell. That's pretty obvious. But let me ask you something. If a man of KG's height, width, and intensity is charging at you screaming like a lunatic, are you going to get a little rattled? Because I would wet myself and call games however it is the big scary man wants me to. And that's not how you want NBA games called.

The final piece of this ridiculous counter-reaction to a call for responsible, mature behavior is the "robot" argument. "I want my players to play with emotion, not be robots!" As if this behavior has anything to do with the emotion of the game. The new rules don't prohibit a fist pump after a big shot down the stretch. From a defeated collapse or hitting the floor after a player knocks down a tough shot over you. It doesn't prevent the hip bumps, chest bumps, high-fives, fist-pounds, jersey-popping, or any of the other things that produce imagery we've come to love about this game. There isn't an ounce of in-game emotion that's being sapped by this rule set.

It's just a measure to force grown men to act as such. If you're capable of shrugging through that mid-March game with the zeal and intensity of a manic-depressive tree slug, you're capable of keeping perspective enough to know that the call was made on you, and whether you like it or not, it is. And it will happen again within the hour, no doubt. If you're mature enough to be paid millions of dollars for your role on a team vying for a championship, you should be mature enough to not badger and scream when something doesn't go your way.

Complaining in the NBA isn't an epidemic. It was simply something that reflected poorly on the game and needed to be corrected. The league took an initiative as such. People say that the market research the NBA is claiming is somehow fabricated, because no one's actually complaining about the complaining. Right. Just like no one wants to hear about LeBron James, as traffic on Heat posts grow to phenomenal numbers.

The NBA does things badly sometimes, like any sports league. And officials will often get calls wrong, like the call on Jermaine O'Neal last night. But in this instance, asking the players to temper their reactions isn't just reasonable, it's the right thing to do, and the game will be better for it, for casual and hardcore fans alike.

You can consider this the complaining about the complaining in response to the rule brought about because of complaining in order to limit complaining.
Posted on: October 14, 2010 9:43 am
 

Shootaround 10.14.10: "The NBA: It's stupid!"

Posted by Royce Young
  • Last night, Kevin Garnett was ejected because he picked up two technicals. The league's really enforcing the new rules in preseason and Doc Rivers said they've just got to deal with it: "It is what it is. We've got to live with it. It's a new, kinder, gentler me. What can you do? Listen, I do think, as a league, it's about all of us. It's not just the officials, the players or the coaches. It's all of us. We have to keep making this a better product and a lot of people smarter than me have decided this is what we need to do. Then that's what we have to do: Adhere to it. I don't think that's that hard."
  • Howard Beck of the New York Times on Amar'e Stoudemire's debut: "The introduction was a tad understated, at least by Amar’e Stoudemire’s standards. He did not dislodge the rim from the backboard or block a shot into the expensive seats or ruin anyone’s self-esteem. There will be many chances for that later, when the games count. Wednesday night was a warm-up, a friendly first date between Stoudemire and his adoring new audience at Madison Square Garden. It was a promising start to the relationship between the desperate fan base and the $100 million star."
  • Posting and Toasting on Timofey Mozgov's debut: "Mozgov started and started strong. He was, as I mentioned, disruptive on defense, and scaled back the silly fouls (4 fouls in 15 minutes is an improvement. Really!). Save for a weird bout of point-center ambition that didn't end well, Mozgov also got some work done on offense. He buried two big boy midrangers (not like the chip shots he'd been sinking earlier in preseason) and even threw an alley-oop TO Raymond Felton. You read that correctly. Timo stayed steadily stellar in his brief appearance."
  • Sebastian Pruiti at NBA Playbook looks at Manu diagramming the final moments of the Spurs-Clippers game. “Misdirection plays like this late are so brilliant because teams always seem to focus on the ball late (I personally think this is due to the fact a lot of teams simply run ISOs late instead of trying to draw up some plays), that screens on the weakside usually go unnoticed until it is too late.”
Posted on: October 13, 2010 8:12 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 7:48 pm
 

Shootaround 10.13.10: KG will cut you off

Posted by Ben Golliver

  • Paul Flannery of WEEI.com with a monster Doc Rivers quote  about Kevin Garnett."Kevin is great. Kevin tries to help every big in here. If that big doesn't listen to him one time, he'll never speak to him again. Literally one time. That has happened a couple of times. Those two guys that he did that to are no longer here and that may be one of the reasons. That's Kevin, when you talk about the Celtic Way, whatever that is, just say Kevin Garnett, and you're pretty much there."
  • Panic briefly struck in Miami Tuesday night, as LeBron James suffered leg cramps during the Heat's exhibition game against CSKA Moscow. James left the court in the third quarter and will be held out of Miami's Wednesday night game, according to ESPN.com's Brian Windhorst .
  • Conor Orr of the Star-Ledger reports  that Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov, often referred to as "the most interesting man in the world", is up on his nicknames. "And there was Nets shooting guard Terrence Williams, who went up to his team's new owner - one of the 40 richest men in the world, with a net worth of nearly $14 billion - and introduced himself, receiving a most familiar greeting in return."Hi, I'm Terrence Williams," he said."Hello, T-Will," Mikhail Prokhorov replied."
  • CJ Hempfield from BulletsForever on Wizards center JaVale McGee during last night's Wizards/Hawks preseason game: "One disturbing trend is that JaVale McGee often appears to be flying in the opposite direction of the flight of the ball on rebound attempts."
  • IndyStar.com's Mike Wells writes that Pacers lottery pick Paul George is struggling from the field because his head is spinning. "Coach Jim O'Brien said George is taking shots within the system, but George is having to soak in as much information as he can, affecting his focus while shooting."When your mind is occupied with where you're supposed to be prior to getting the ball, how to set your man up for a screen down, it can be a little overwhelming," O'Brien said. "There's so much going on in his mind that it prevents him from playing in a natural flow. When you're not playing with a natural flow, you're not going to shoot the basketball as well as you normally would."
  • The Warriors like what they see from guard Monta Ellis defensively against big guards like Tyreke Evanswrites Rusty Simmons . "You have to have toughness, and I think (Ellis) has shown the ability to fight," head coach Keith Smart said. "There are going to be some guys who are just too powerful, but he is going to be able to compete against top guards in the league. We have to be creative enough to find ways to do it on the nights when he can't do it one-on-one."
Posted on: October 7, 2010 9:28 am
 

Shootaround 10.7.10: Thinkin' 'Bout Things

Bulls thinkin' 'bout Dampier, Wizards thinkin' 'bout a name change, and Kidd thinkin' 'bout playing till he's 40, all in today's Shootaround.
Posted by Matt Moore


Peja Stojakovic says health will determine if he plays past this season , the final year of his contract. He wants to get through just one year pain free. It's something we rarely consider with these players, treating injuries like they're some sort of outside clamp that prevents them from playing instead of actual pain the players are experiencing.

With Boozer on the shelf, the Bulls are taking a long look at Erick Dampier, according to Marc Stein of ESPN.com . The Bulls waived Chris Richard this week, which is surprising considering their lack of frontcourt depth and the job Richard did in limited minutes.

Marcin Gortat is not going to suddenly get quiet about the issue: he wants a bigger role, now. Unfortunately for him, the Magic are pretty much like "Deal with it, baldy ." Gortat signed a huge contract with the Mavericks last summer but the Magic matched it in restricted free agenc and here we are. For some reason the Magic think having a severely disgruntled Polish guy called "The Hammer" on their team is a good idea.

So this is pretty awesome. Ted Leonsis, the new Wizards owner, posted 101 things the Wizards have put in play to try and improve the fan experience at Wizards games. Some of the smallest details are covered, like how fresh the hot dog buns are. But hidden in there is the following: Changing the name back to the Bullets. Status? "Under consideration." Hold your breath, Bullets fans.

The Hawks exercised their option on Jeff Teague, which should surprise absolutely no one. Teague's locked up through next year, if there is a next year.

Kevin Garnett "went to a dark place " after last year's Finals, which is just classic over-the-top Garnett talk. He was pretty much a wreck after losing that series, leaving you to wonder how he deals with life in any sort of way whatsoever.

Rudy Ferandez' agent went absolutely psycho-hose-beast on local radio, basically pulling a "Leave Britney alone" speech for Fernandez. The kicker is when asked why Rudy wants to go home: "There's friends, there's family, he's a shy guy. He's special." And also a Fraggle, apparently.

Josh McRoberts had an outstanding line last night and the bandwagon is starting to Heat up. McRoberts has already filled into the starting PF spot for the Pacers, and with little competition, will probably hold onto it. A star is born? Maybe?

Jason Kidd wants to play until he's 40 , which is just ridiculous and yet completely believable on all fronts. Oddly, he's already a defensive liability, but the Mavs are thinking about moving him to shooting guard. Which could end up disastrous, but hey, you never know with Kidd. Dude's a survivor. He's going to make it. He's going to work harder. Keep on survivin'. What ?

This Nets-Knicks rivalry gets more entertaining every day .
Posted on: September 30, 2010 9:41 am
 

Shootaround 9.30: D-Howard makes children's music

Posted by Royce Young
  • Dwight Howard has a children's CD coming out. The album is called "Shoot for the Stars" and some of the tracks on it include: "Whoop There It Is," "U Can't Touch This," "Banana Boat" and "ABC." I smell Grammy.
  • The trade rumors aren't bothering AK-47: "First of all, there's not much I can do," Kirilenko told the Deseret News. "Secondary, I don't really care what the people (are) thinking. My job is to play basketball, and it's as simple as that ... I don't really care about rumors," Kirilenko added. "I spoke with (Jazz general manager) Kevin (O'Connor) and Jerry (Sloan), and they said, 'Look, we don't have any intentions' ... So, I'd rather believe them than the rumors."
  • Tom Moore of PhillyBurbs.com: "At Doug Collins' request, Reggie Miller delivered a message to the 76ers on the second day of training camp Wednesday. As the NBA's all-time leader in made 3-pointers (2,560) and one of the best clutch shooters in league history before retiring in 2005, Miller would seem to have plenty of cache with today's players because of his on-court accomplishments. And he more than held their attention as he talked and demonstrated what he was saying, according to those in the gym at the time."
  • Jeff Pearlman of SI writes that he wants his kids to watch Eddy Curry so they won't be like him: "That's why, as Curry collects $11.3 million for sitting on the bench this season, I'll tell my kids all about him. "See that guy," I'll say. "The one in street clothes eating the hoagie. His name is Eddy Curry. He's young, he was wealthy, he's gifted -- and he's invisible."
Posted on: September 29, 2010 9:28 am
Edited on: September 29, 2010 10:04 am
 

Shootaround 9.29.10: Mileage Edition

Davis is a baby, Brooks wants his dough, Garnett's feeling spry, and Hayward bought a new car in today's Shootaround.
Posted by Matt Moore


The only exception to the "rah-rah," "happy to be back," "excited for the season to start" mantras of NBA Media Days and training camp sessions is the public extension demands. Aaron Brooks has entered that arena in full garb. Brooks told the Houston Chronicle that his contract situation is "bothering" him . Brooks is a tough spot for the Rockets . He's emerged as one of the best players on the team, and helped keep them afloat through Yao Ming 's injury. But he's also a score-first point guard who's not terribly efficient. He gets the job done, but not well enough to make it a no-brainer. Which is likely why the Rockets have decided to wait to enter discussions on an extension with him.

Donnie Walsh denied that the Knicks tampered in any way with the now-dead four-team deal proposal for Carmelo Anthony . Very quietly, the Knicks and Nets are kind of slipping into a nasty little rivalry between the two teams, one that's likely to only accelerate when the Nets move to Brooklyn.

Charlie Villanueva is actually wracked by guilt about his performance last season. It's nice to hear that from an athlete, as they typically tend to bristle and deny that they even had a bad year, or explain it away. The question is how he'll actually improve, because the things he's typically criticized for are difficult to improve upon, often considered "you have it or you don't" territory. But stranger things have happened...

Apparently Kevin Garnett is feeling spry, prompting Boston media to claim he'll be back to 2008 standards . I would consider this to fall under the category of "jinxing yourself into oblivion." Garnett was healthy enough for the Celtics to win the East. That needs to be the expectation. Anything else is failing to acknowledge the realities of the situation.

Jacque Vaughn has joined the Spurs coaching staff, and Pop thinks he's got the same qualities as Avery Johnson. The comparisons are striking to a certain degree.

Efforts for a new arena in Sacramento have hit a gigantic iron wall. Keep your eyes on the horizon for storm clouds.

Triano has no reservations about playing Barbosa at point. That's a weird thing to be discussing with both Jarret Jack and Jose Calderon on roster, making a combined eleventy billion dollars. Additionally, that seems an awful lot like a recipe for the highest turnover margin in professional basketball history.

Glen Davis is acting like a... wait for it... baby about his role with the Celtics and Doc's not particularly drawn to take care of him.

Rashard Lewis is spending more time at small forward this year. That's a pretty big move, and one that could have significant changes for how the Magic do business. The trick is that the Magic have had so much success with Lewis at the four, and a move otherwise could change their four-out, one-in approach. But it could also provide them more balance. Things are so complex.

Gordon Hayward bought a shiny new car with his contract... a Honda Accord. That's just great.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com