Tag:Minnesota Timberwolves
Posted on: September 1, 2010 8:06 am
Edited on: September 1, 2010 8:07 am
 

Shootaround 9.1.10: Evans putting the J back in

Evans' J, Love's weird way, and the James kiddos' first day, today in the Shootaround.
Posted by Matt Moore


The Hawks aren't planning on taking their time with Al Horford's extension. They're planning on offering him a near-max extension before the October 31st deadline, meaning they'll have given up $190 million in salary for two players the year before the CBA dramatically shifts. Horford is an All-Star center, young, versatile, and extremely aware on both sides of the ball. Kelly Dwyer pointed out that the Hawks have some options with Horford. Unfortunately, they seem ready to rush into the breach with wallets wide open. You have to wonder how they're going to find salary room for any of the other players, let alone Jamal Crawford, who also wants an extension... or a trade.

Tyreke Evans has reinvested himself in his jump shot. What's interesting is that he was a terrible shooter (32%) from midrange, 16-23 feet last season, but a very decent one from 10-15 feet (43.2%). As Sam Amick's profile reveals, Evans used to be a tremendous shooter, he just needs to reacquaint himself with his shot. It could be a significant leap forward in his offensive development. Which is terrifying, considering how good he was last year.

A Wolf Among Wolves discusses Kevin Love's Team USA summer, and the fact that he's best suited for a third option role. Which makes sense, since the Wolves have buried him in the past for Darko Milicic and just traded for Michael Beasley who most scouts agree is best suited for the power forward role. You know. Third best option.

It's kind of a shame that Shaq's teams didn't end up meeting the Spurs over the years. Because the Duncan-Shaq rivalry is prett good.

George Karl was surprised at the firing of Mark Warkentien. He speaks highly of Warkentien, as well as Masai Ujiri. You have to wonder just how spread to the four corners the entire Nuggets organization is at this point.

LeBron James is a human . No one really seems to think so at this point, but it's true.

Ersan Ilyasova is tearing up FIBA play . Which could be a good thing for the Bucks as he develops and takes on more of a leadership role. Or it could cause him to wonder why he's been shoved to the back of the line in the Bucks' forward feeding trough with the additions of Drew Gooden, Larry Sanders, and others.

A fascinating look at roster balance on the wings for the Knicks, not in terms of skillset, but shot performance on the right versus the left side of the floor. Interesting note: Ramond Felton took exactly as many shots from the right side as the left, and hit the same percentage.

The numerous discussions of Marquis Daniels have overlooked one aspect: Doc Rivers completely took him out of the rotation in the playoffs, despite him having recovered from injury. The trust is simply not there on a team that depends on it so much.

The Bucks hope and expect Andrew Bogut to be back for the season opener. It's close, but don't hold your breath.


Posted on: August 31, 2010 5:40 pm
 

Offers starting to pop up for Carmelo

Posted by Royce Young

There's no telling how many times Masai Ujiri's phone has already rang. Some were probably congratulatory calls on his new position with the Nuggets, but I'm guessing 95 percent of them have included the words "Carmelo Anthony," "trade" and "we'll offer."

And according to John Rothstein of the MSG Network, the Bulls have already inquired offering up a package that includes Taj Gibson and Luol Deng. That doesn't mean that is the offer, but it means that the Bulls are reportedly offering a deal that includes those two players. Rothstein also reported that the Nets have made a few calls, but any trade discussions with Denver aren't including Brook Lopez. Smart move there by the Nets.

Those are just two of the teams reportedly interested in Anthony though. We've heard the Kings, the Warriors, the Hornets, the Timberwolves, the Knicks, the Magic and the Rockets all pop up as well along with the Nets and Bulls.

What's interesting about any offer that comes in to the Denver front office is figuring out what the Nuggets are aftet? Is it talent? Is it assets? Is it picks? It's pretyy well agreed upon that Denver won't get equal return on Anthony, but just because you trade a star doesn't mean you can't come out sunny on the other side.

Jeremy Wagner of Roundball Mining Company put together an interest list of offers from fellow team bloggers. He ranked them and interestingly, both offers from the Nets' bloggers didn't include Lopez and Wagner didn't like the offers. Devin Harris, Terrence Williams and some picks isn't doing much for a Nuggets fan and it's likely not doing much for Ujiri either.

Ujiri reportedly will meet with Anthony soon and told Marc J. Spears of Yahoo! that he wants Anthony to be a Nugget. But Ujiri also said that the door hasn't closed on the possibility of trading. Of course Ujiri would prefer not to trade Carmelo because replacing the face of your franchise is almost impossible to do in a trade, but sometimes your hand is forced. And in this situation, that appears to be the case. The phone calls are going to keep coming for Ujiri, and not very many will involve much congratulations.
Posted on: August 30, 2010 12:19 pm
Edited on: August 30, 2010 12:33 pm
 

So where do we stand with Carmelo Anthony?

Posted by Royce Young

News about Carmelo Anthony's potential departure from Denver started coming out about a month ago. First it was Ken Berger's report saying Melo wanted to play in New York. Then Ric Bucher of ESPN informed the world that Melo was pretty much a lock to be moved. Everything cooled a bit, but then Adrian Wojnarowski of Yahoo! came along to shake the tree once again.

All signs (and news) points to Anthony leaving Denver. But that doesn't mean that new general manager Masai Ujiri isn't going to try and pull a Dell Demps and salvage the relationship. Nuggets executive Josh Kroenke already had a meeting with Melo, but Wojnarowski reported it didn't go that great. Now Ujiri will meet with Anthony and try and convince him of the Nuggets plan. This goes against Wojnarowski's report that said Denver was basically finished talking to Anthony. But then again, it might just be a front by the Nuggets to put on the appearance that they're desperately trying to keep Melo.

"I love Melo," Ujiri told The Denver Post . "I grew up in this league with Melo, kind of. It was my first years in the league, and I watched him grow. The Denver Nuggets want to keep Melo, and that's our priority. Carmelo is the Denver Nuggets, he's the city of Denver. He's done so well on this team. So we're going to deal with the issue full force."

Ujiri will have to sell Anthony on the chance to win. He can't convince him that he can maximize marketing in Denver. He can't convince him that his profile will rise. He can't convince him that his wife will get to be closer to bright lights. He can't convince him of a lot of things. But he does have the ability to tell Anthony that the Nuggets are good enough to win now and that he has plan to     make them better. But Melo doesn't want to test free agency because he'll likely lose millions because of the new CBA and if he had interest in staying with Denver, he'd have signed that three-year extension weeks ago.

So it comes to down to Ujiri's pitch and if that doesn't work, then it's off to finding a suitor. Whether that's now or later, the Nuggets have the most leverage by making a move sooner than later. And one interesting thing to go with this: As John Hollinger of ESPN mentioned, if Denver trades Anthony, there's really no point in them hanging on to Chauncey Billups in his last year of a contract either. Which of course makes this whole thing so much more intriguing.

A lot of teams are popping up as destinations for Anthony, with some making a lot more sense than others. Sam Amico of NBA.com reports that three teams lead the pack for the Nuggets right now and that's the Timberwolves, Kings and Nets. But the biggest key in a deal for any team willing to give away assets to get Anthony is if he's willing to sign an immediate extension with his new team. And other than the Nets, those teams haven't really been a prime location for Anthony, if we're to believe the multiple reports out about where he prefers to sign.

Right now, the Rockets, Knicks, Magic, Hornets, Clippers, Bobcats, Timberwolves, Kings, Nets and Warriors have all been mentioned. In other words, basically one-third of the league. And of course, there's always the possibility that Anthony will stay with Denver. I think the serious contenders here are the Rockets, Magic, Knicks, Clippers and Nets. But that's just my own personal inclination.

While the Bobcats have the Jordan connection, the Warriors have nice assets to offer, the Wolves have picks, the Hornets have the draw of Chris Paul and the Kings have, well, I'm not really sure, I think you can eliminate them all. Anthony is going to go somewhere he's happy with and I can't see one of those destinations making sense for him, especially with all the hassle he's going through getting out of Denver.

Anthony is almost assuredly headed out of the Rockies. But that's not stopping Ujiri from trying to salvage the situation at the eleventh hour. It's unlikely he can convince Anthony to stay, but you definitely can't blame him for the effort.
Posted on: August 26, 2010 10:31 am
Edited on: August 26, 2010 11:13 am
 

Pop Quiz: Who's the worst?

Posted by Matt Moore

Fall is here, hear the yell, back to school, ring the bell ... The NBA season is right around the corner, and NBA training camp starts in just a few short weeks. To get you ready for the NBA season, we've put together 25 pop quizzes. Pencils ready? We continue our Pop Quizzes with this question...

Who will be the worst team in the NBA this season?


It's a depressing question, isn't it? Who's going to fail more than any other? Someone has to win the fewest number of games this year. So who's on the list?

The Returning Champ: The New Jersey Nets

You can't just let the reigning "champs" off the list without giving them a chance to repeat! The Nets were the worst team in the league last year, only able to avoid the worst mark of all time due to a late surge. It was a startling development, one that baffled a lot of NBA heads, because the team really did have talent. But for whatever reason (injury, chemistry, coaching, pure terrible luck), it never came together and the team plummeted into the depths. So are they doomed to repeat history?

The Nets struck out in free agency for the top names but still brought in good players. Anthony Morrow, Jordan Farmar, Travis Outlaw, and Troy Murphy will all be suiting up for the Nets alongside Devin Harris, Terrence Williams, and Brook Lopez. With the development of the younger players, the addition of a few talented veterans, and a more demanding coach in Avery Johnson, the Nets may not be in position to push for the playoffs, but they are unlikely to repeat as the worst team in the NBA.

The New Kids: The Toronto Raptors


Our first victim of the free-agency summer of doom. After losing Chris Bosh to the triad, GM Brian Colangelo went on a firesale. He ditched Hedo Turkoglu for Leandro Barbosa and sent Marco Belinelli for Julian Wright. He did spend some money, though, giving Amir Johnson a hefty new deal and bringing Linas Kleiza back from overseas. The Raptors lost a huge chunk of salary, and weren't that great to begin with. They are teetering on the abyss. Will they fall off?

Bear in mind that we're talking the worst here. Not bad, but the worst. And the Raptors could assuredly reach that mark if everything were to go wrong. But there are bright spots. Andrea Bargnani, for all his rebound-void, yogurty, forceless  weaknesses, can still hit from anywhere on the floor, and might actually get to play where he's best (high-post and mid-range) with Bosh gone instead of trying to impersonate a traditional center. DeMar DeRozan has the athleticism and range to be able to become a leader. Sonny Weems continues to impress, Amir Johnson will forever be lauded as the next great (whistle) defensive player (whistle) if only he could (whistle) stop fouling (whistle). If the Raptors drop off a cliff, it'll be because the chemistry wasn't fit to hold, or because the real problem in Toronto hasn't been Colangelo's roster, but Triano's coaching.

The Dark Horse: The Washington Wizards


How could any team with John Wall be the worst team in the league? When you have as fragile a chemistry set as this team does. That's how. The Wizards are a long shot to burrow into the trash heap the furthest, but with Gilbert Arenas anything but a sure thing, there's just no telling how this is going to work out. We thought the biggest concern with Arenas last year was if he could stay healthy a full season. We didn't even get to answer that. Andray Blatche is the third best player on the team, and that could go any number of ways. He could be a consistent scorer, working in tandem with Wall, and showcasing the scoring ability he showed last season. Or he could become a space cadet again. JaVale McGee showed great things in Summer League, but he's yet to prove he can be someone to be relied on as the primary big.

Wall is likely to be good enough to drag this team out of the very basement, and if everything were to go right (and I mean everything), the Wizards could find themselves in contention for the playoffs. But if another chemistry blow-up happens and Flip Saunders is unable to contain the damage and get through, the Wizards could be a two-year disaster.

The Favorite: The Minnesota Timberwolves


Okay, let's try the opposite. Let's try and figure out how the Wolves could avoid being the worst team in the league. Option No. 1, another team has a rash of injuries that makes Houston seem like Phoenix. Okay, barring that, Option No.2, we need the following to occur:

A. Luke Ridnour picks up where he left off in Milwaukee, being a solid game manager and reliable shooter.
B. Martell Webster slides in and immediately begins to contribute as he did in Portland, providing the perimeter scoring missing in Minny last year.
C. Wesley Johnson was in fact, the best player available at 3, better or at least within range of DeMarcus Cousins only without the chemistry problems, and is able to pick up the pro game's speed and awareness necessary to contribute.
D. Jonny Flynn recovers on schedule from hip surgery.
E. Kurt Rambis and David Kahn get over whatever problems they had with Kevin Love last season, and Love is allowed to be on the floor and become the player everyone else believes he is.
F. Darko Milicic actually was worth five years and $20 million, and alongside Love makes for a stout front court.
G. The triangle, one of the more complex and difficult systems to run, which has only been successful for two teams under one coach with the best or second best player in the league at all times, magically works for a lottery team lacking in both veteran smarts and talent.
H. Mike Beasley really was just misunderstood.

That's a lot that needs to go right. Wolves fans tend to think the media picks on them because of their market. As a proponent of small markets, I'm here to say that's not the case. It's because this team is bad. It was built badly, with bad contracts for bad players, with a bad system for its personnel, and it needs significant upgrades at nearly every position and at multiple depth levels in order to make itself right. The Wolves could come together and shove it in the faces of all the doubters. But until we see the actual manifestation of all the supposed potential the roster holds, your Minnesota Timberwolves are expected to be the worst team in the NBA this season.


Posted on: August 17, 2010 8:39 am
Edited on: August 17, 2010 10:16 am
 

Shootaround 8.17.10: New uniforms for everyone

Posted by Royce Young
  • An extremely smart look at Tim Duncan v. Karl Malone in the greatest power forward of all-time discussion: "When you look at Karl Malone’s stats compared to Tim Duncan it is hard to make the case that Duncan is a better player that Malone. Why? Because it is hard to make the case that many players are better than Karl Malone by looking at the stats. He is 2nd all time in career points and 3rd all time in win shares (an estimate of the number of wins contributed by a player) with more win shares than everyone but Kareem and Wilt. Tim Duncan would need 6 more years of his average production to equal Malone. As it currently stands he is still isn’t within shouting distance of the Mailman. However, any Duncan supporter might bring up the fact that of course Malone’s career numbers would be better because he played 19 seasons."
  • JaVale McGee makes a common statement: "Reporters who never played the game of basketball or never succeeded in it… Shouldn’t b able to report on it #FACT"
  • Scott Carefoot for The Basketball Jones on why you shouldn't sleep on Blake Griffin: "He’s not just a great dunker, of course, or else he wouldn’t have been the first overall pick. He’s also a highly productive rebounder, he’s a very good ballhandler for his size, and everybody who knows him claims he has a great attitude and work ethic. Plus, he’s had a full season to study the pro game from the sidelines so he should be prepared for the speed and flow of the NBA when he returns to the court."
  • Sam Amick of Fanhouse talked with Ron Artest: "I'm always hungry. That's the good thing about me. Every year I'm hungry. That's the good thing about me is I don't have to get any more motivated. There's nothing anybody can do to motivate me. I'm already there 100 percent. ... That's the good thing about being me. I'm going to work hard every day." Hey, what's the good thing about him?
  • Big Baby Davis says he's ready to grow up and change: "This is the year of finally hitting that line of maturity, of finally becoming that player that I knew I could be." Throughout my career, my three years being here, it's been up and down. When I play, you've seen glimpses, like, 'Wow, this guy could start. Or come off the bench.' Glimpses up and down. But this is the year of Glen becoming that whole player that 10 years down the road, eight years down the road, will hopefully be an All-Star."
Posted on: August 16, 2010 3:55 pm
Edited on: August 16, 2010 3:56 pm
 

Wolves unveil new uniforms

Minnesota debuts new colors and uniforms that don't completley insult the age and intelligence of everyone that sees them, ever.
Posted by Matt Moore


Man, if they'd just done this three years ago, they might have kept Kevin Garnett.

(That is not a true statement; it is false.)

The Timberwolves today unveiled their newest uniforms , which are actually just adjustments to the ones they unveiled two years ago . But whereas the last revamps were a step backwards (which is saying something for a team whose design brings up descriptions of "mismatched lego designs of third graders"), the newest ones seem to be a pretty good move in the right direction.



Notice the green being gone? You see, because the green is gone. Other than that, I'd like to point out that the green is gone.

(Sorry, that color used to make me physically angry when i'd see it on their uniforms and logos. It was like they were trying to jam the color green in. As if using that color spoke to their longterm connection with coniferous trees through basketball.)

The sharper lines reflect a more moder approach, and the shadowed repitition on the tails of the shorts speaks to both their small forward and point guard situations. Both repetitive and hollow. But the color scheme is much sharper and by going to a simpler approach, they've really improved from a visual standpoint. If only they could do the same thing with their offensive system.

(HT: TWolves Blog )

Posted on: August 6, 2010 11:37 am
Edited on: August 6, 2010 11:46 am
 

Of leadership, LeBron, and KG

Posted by Matt Moore

Kevin Garnett is one of the most respected players in the NBA, with good reason. No one has shown  more focus at both ends of the floor over the past decade than Kevin Garnett. Much of his trademarked intensity is show; the screaming, spitting, growling is revealed as little more than theatrics when you employ them as often as he has. But that doesn't change how he's constantly barking out defensive assignments, dressing down teammates, and blocking the ever-loving crap out of anyone that dares to challenge his authority (or dying trying). He's a 13-time All-Star, and has an MVP trophy, a Defensive Player of the Year trophy, and an NBA champion.

And with all that respect that he has earned comes a level of expectation, often unfair, mostly ridiculous, that he live up to what we believe is the model of a true NBA legend. Or at least, that's been the pattern for everyone except KG. And if you want proof of that, compare KG and LeBron James.

In 2010, LeBron James abandoned his team, the Cavaliers, and did it in a publicly humiliating and disgracefully opulent way on national television. Maybe you heard about it, here and there. Before we continue, let's be very clear on this point:

The primary reason for the backlash against James is the way in which he announced his decision ("The Decision"), the way he seemingly laughed and skipped out of town while the dreams he had given Cleveland fans burned to the ground. There is simply no way to defend or even deflect that criticism. You're not going to find anyone outside of South Beach who thinks this was in any way acceptable. KG has never behaved in such a way, nor did he embarrass Minnesota on the way out of town. The way the two left is simply not comparable. See, I put it in bold, just so we're all clear on this.

However, the secondary argument against James is that he has in some way compromised his legacy, lessened his greatness, by not being the sole elite player on his team. He is no longer considered able to reach the sport's summit because he has joined Dwyane Wade's team instead of building championship gold from the rubble he was drafted into. That by joining other elite players, he can no longer be considered elite.

Let's head on back to 2007.

Kevin Garnett has failed to reach the summit with the Minnesota Timberwolves, the team that drafted him. Though there were a handful of very good teams, none of them even approached what you would call a "great" team. The Sam Cassell-Latrell Sprewell team rose and fell apart as fast as it came together, and Garnett has been losing consistently. It becomes known that he wants out, wants to be traded to a contender, does not want to waste his career any longer. He doesn't outright say he wants to be traded, after all, you're fined for such activity. But it's made pretty clear that his time with Minnesota is over. It's done. He winds up heading to Boston, joining Ray Allen and Paul Pierce, the captain, to form the first modern Big 3 and first relative superteam since the Lakers' 2004 crime against nature.

(It should be noted that the Spurs' combination of Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, and Manu Ginobili definitely constituted enough talent as to be considered a superteam, but more perhaps more impressively, they did it organically. They came to have three superstars by developing the talent they drafted. Not by acquiring the gold when the market was high on it.)

But KG was and is the leader, right? Well, I don't know. Paul Pierce is the captain, right? And the guy taking the game winning shots, most often? The face of the team? It's heart and soul? Isn't Pierce the one most often relied upon to rally the team? While Garnett is undeniably a leader on the Celtics, is he really considered the leader?

Oddly, what led me down this line of thought was a quote from, of all people, Rasho Nesterovic.

In an interview with rtvslo.com , and translated and brought forth by Project Spurs , Nesterovic talks about the difference between Garnett and Duncan. He discusses how Duncan won with the team that drafted him, and how Garnett made the smart move, but it was one to turn to the Celtics, who already had a leader in Pierce. This all leads to Nesterovic saying Duncan was the greater power forward of his time.

Huh.

Now, this is Rasho Nesterovic. We're not talking Bill Russell here. But the idea is one that deserves consideration. Did KG join the Celtics as a leader, or did he simply do the exact same thing that LeBron James did, only under better PR cover? The argument can certainly be made that James joined in free agency (which is apparently worse than bailing on your team while under contract with them), while Garnett was traded, so it wasn't really his decision. But if Garnett had told Minnesota management, "I don't want to be traded. I either win here, or I don't win at all," do you really think the Wolves would have said "No, no, Mr. Hall-of-Fame-Most-Beloved-Player-In
-Franchise-History, we want no part of you here"? Is that what you think would have occurred? Because I'm pretty sure Kevin McHale would have just gone back to figuring out ways to build the Wolves around KG (and failing miserably).

The argument could also be made that KG was on a "loser" while James was on a contending team. But there are two responses to that. 1. While this Cavs team was certainly better than any KG had, James has also been superior in terms of production (and playoff success if we're being honest) than anything KG had been. I'm simply pointing out that if you're going to say the Cavs were better, you also have to point out that James was better, and was a reason for the Cavs being better. And 2, is there really a difference between contender-but-not-champion and loser in our society? I don't subscribe to this. I think there are tons of brilliant players that simply were never fortunate enough to run into the blessed set of circumstances you need to win a championship (or play for LA). But if you're a results oriented person, KG and James had accomplished the same thing, and so to say that one needed to do what he needed in order to win a ring and the other needed to continue to struggle is a bit ridiculous.

We come to the crux of this, which is actually not that KG deserves more criticism or scorn for leaving Minnesota to fall into the void. Far from it. Garnett recognized that he needed to win a ring before his time was up, that it wasn't going to happen in Minny, and that Boston represented the best chance for him. He took it. He doesn't deserve to be slagged for that. Garnett has told other players not to let what happened to him in Minnesota happen to them. Now, that particular action is a little less likable. After all, there have been players that stayed "home" and eventually reached the promised land, and those championships are much more special to their small markets than the umpteenth championship for a storied franchise. This is nothing to do with the quality of the fans and just the simple fact that a lone championship means more than one of many.

But Garnett is simply passionate about being the best he can be. And for him, that meant joining a team with an established star, a veteran leader, along with another veteran leader, and winning a championship. That was his path. And it is not all that dissimilar from LeBron James' path (in terms of the end result; remember, the bold clause! The bold clause!). So if we're going to criticize James for not being "the man," we need to similarly disparage Garnett, Pau Gasol, and other players that did what they needed to in order to win a ring.

Garnett is no villain. He loved Minnesota. But in the end, he felt his best chance for achieving that ring was in Boston, alongside other stars. Those facts coincide with LeBron James' actions of the past three months. Even if you feel that Garnett was able to be a leader alongside Paul Pierce (the most rational and likely conclusion), you should at least recognize the same dynamic's likelihood in Miami. You don't have to like how James pulled off this career correction. No one does. But to question his legacy opens up a Pandora's Box that is linked throughout some of the greatest players in the history of the league.

Don't throw stones. The halls of NBA greatness are built of glass.

Posted on: August 4, 2010 8:49 am
 

Shootaround 8.4.10: The Z-Bo Conundrum

Posted by Matt Moore

  • Could Shaq be coming off the bench ? Sure, it makes sense, but the big guy has never come off the bench, not even last year in Cleveland. And there's been no indication that he's had some sort of ego-check over the past four months. It's much more likely that this could cause some friction off the bat. If the Celtics go on a losing streak, you're going to hear from O'Neal. The Shaq one. Not the Jermaine one. Man, this is going to get confusing.
  • The Grizzlies have a conundrum on their hands with Zach Randolph. Z-Bo wants a pricey new contract extension. The Grizzlies face a strict new CBA next year. The problem is that Randolph is Memphis' first All-Star since Pau Gasol and is credited with the lion's share of the success Memphis had last season. The fact that this is wholly incorrect (Marc Gasol's pinch post play and Rudy Gay and O.J. Mayo's ability to spread the floor were what allowed Randolph room to work; Randolph is the tip of the spear) is irrelevant, his performance was clearly outstanding and he deserves a bump. But at his age, with his locker room concerns, and a hazy ceiling for this Grizzlies team, committing long-term may not be the best plan.
  • Magic Basketball lays out the comprehensive case for the prime of Tracy McGrady in NBA lore.
  • Roundball Mining Company reviews the Mark Warkentian era and comes to this conclusion: "The ultimate flaw in the Warkentien ear was the Nuggets inability to see the need to add another quality big man during the 2009-10 season." The lesson here is: It doesn't matter how much you build a team up, it's that one step back that kills you.
  • They say insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result. If Mike Wells is right , the Pacers are insane.


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com