Tag:D-League
Posted on: October 22, 2010 12:07 am
 

Mavericks roster set for now and later

Mavericks unexpectedly keep Steve Novak and Brian Cardinal despite previous decision to only hold 13 on roster. Posted by Matt Moore

The Dallas Mavericks are simultaneously gunning for this season and setting themselves up for the future. Dirk Nowitzki is entering his last contract. Jason Kidd is a dinosaur. Jason Terry is less of a jet and more of a Wright Brothers airplane. But it's still talented, versatile, and a strong contender for the No. 2 seed in the Western Conference. To fill out that versatile orster, the Mavericks today confirmed that both Steve Novak and Brian Cardinal would be making the roster. To make room , they waived Rashad McCants and Sean Williams.

The Mavericks had spoken strongly of only carrying 13 on the active roster, but loved what both Cardinal and Novak did in camp and preseason . It's an example of how hard work and chemistry can overcome an organization's conservative convictions. Cardinal is nothing to write home about, but he's a pro and has a good reputation from previous benches he's played on. Novak is a curious case. He blossomed in Houston, struggled in LA with the Clippers (who doesn't?) and has been lighting it up in preseason. He's shot 41% in thre preseason and with his size could be a dangerous perimeter option off the bench in a crunch.

Meanwhile, the Mavericks cut McCants who is expected to join their D-League affiliate in Frisco which begins play this year. Though not formally associated with the Texas Legends, the Mavericks have been instrumental in the formation of the team, with GM Donnie Nelson taking a significant role in the franchise. The Mavericks appear to be starting to examine their future, even as the current core begins another desperate attempt to finally claim the ring to validate a stellar run in the 2000's.


Posted on: October 14, 2010 9:43 am
 

Shootaround 10.14.10: "The NBA: It's stupid!"

Posted by Royce Young
  • Last night, Kevin Garnett was ejected because he picked up two technicals. The league's really enforcing the new rules in preseason and Doc Rivers said they've just got to deal with it: "It is what it is. We've got to live with it. It's a new, kinder, gentler me. What can you do? Listen, I do think, as a league, it's about all of us. It's not just the officials, the players or the coaches. It's all of us. We have to keep making this a better product and a lot of people smarter than me have decided this is what we need to do. Then that's what we have to do: Adhere to it. I don't think that's that hard."
  • Howard Beck of the New York Times on Amar'e Stoudemire's debut: "The introduction was a tad understated, at least by Amar’e Stoudemire’s standards. He did not dislodge the rim from the backboard or block a shot into the expensive seats or ruin anyone’s self-esteem. There will be many chances for that later, when the games count. Wednesday night was a warm-up, a friendly first date between Stoudemire and his adoring new audience at Madison Square Garden. It was a promising start to the relationship between the desperate fan base and the $100 million star."
  • Posting and Toasting on Timofey Mozgov's debut: "Mozgov started and started strong. He was, as I mentioned, disruptive on defense, and scaled back the silly fouls (4 fouls in 15 minutes is an improvement. Really!). Save for a weird bout of point-center ambition that didn't end well, Mozgov also got some work done on offense. He buried two big boy midrangers (not like the chip shots he'd been sinking earlier in preseason) and even threw an alley-oop TO Raymond Felton. You read that correctly. Timo stayed steadily stellar in his brief appearance."
  • Sebastian Pruiti at NBA Playbook looks at Manu diagramming the final moments of the Spurs-Clippers game. “Misdirection plays like this late are so brilliant because teams always seem to focus on the ball late (I personally think this is due to the fact a lot of teams simply run ISOs late instead of trying to draw up some plays), that screens on the weakside usually go unnoticed until it is too late.”
Posted on: September 29, 2010 10:58 am
Edited on: September 29, 2010 10:59 am
 

D-League adding in FIBA goaltending rule

Posted by Royce Young

The NBA uses the D-League as a place for young players to work on their game, build up a reputation and at some point, maybe have a chance to be called to the professional level. And the same goes for new rules.

Sometimes, the D-League is used as a place to experiment with new rules to see how they operate in a live professional basketball game. And that's what will happen this season, as the famous FIBA goaltending rule will be brought over to the D-League.

A refresher in case you forgot: The FIBA goaltending rule basically says that once the ball hits the iron, it can be knocked off. In the NBA, if the ball is in the "cylinder" it has to be left there until it either falls off the rim or bounces in. But now, players can jump up and clear the ball off the rim.

As Scott Schroeder of FanHouse mentioned, these rule changes are rumored to have been a request from the NBA as an experiment, possibly similar to the D-League's testing of a new, synthetic basketball before its official use in the NBA for the 2006-2007 season. The new basketball didn't make it very long though in the NBA as NBA commissioner David Stern brought back the traditional leather basketball less than halfway into the season because of complaints from players.

This isn't the first time the NBA has tried this though. The goaltending rule was altered in the D-League in 2005, but that change only lasted one year. Schroeder surmises this change is a response by the NBA to FIBA's institution of a few new NBA-like rules into FIBA internernational play. Secretary general of FIBA, Patrick Baumann, made a comment prior to the World Championships about hoping for the goaltending rule change to come over. And it looks like David Stern gave him his wish. At least in the D-League.

So what to make of the rule change? Most people love the FIBA goaltending rule because it makes for an exciting moment when a player realizes the ball has bounced two or three times and he goes up and clears it. It's like the basketball equivalent of robbing someone of a home run. Though in the NBA where players are far more athletic, it might be difficult for the rule to be as successful because of the nature of playing above the rim. What if the score drops dramatically? What if it slows the game down because of the extra whistles? Or what if there's an extremely controversial call in a big game?

The rule is great in international play because it's kind of this kitschy, but unique rule that adds in interesting dynamic to the FIBA games. But I'm not so sure that it'll work for 82 games a year in the NBA. But hey, that's why they're trying it out in the D-League first.
Posted on: September 3, 2010 9:17 am
 

Shootaround 9.3.10: What's in a position?

Posted by Royce Young
  • Positionality has become quite a discussion this offseason and Daniel Leroux of Real GM has an interesting take: "The new-look Miami Heat provide an excellent prism for discussing the positional paradigm since they have a few atypical examples when it comes to positional definitions. Both Wade and LeBron have been the primary ballhandler on their teams in recent years, mostly to great success, as each led their respective positions in assists per game each of the last three seasons. In fact, other than Jason Kidd (who is listed at 6’4”, but is clearly a PG on offense and defense), all ten of the best assist per game seasons by a player 6’4” or taller since the 2003 Draft have been by Wade and James. However, neither spends much time guarding the point guard position, which is obviously the traditional lead position offensively."
  • Tom Haberstroh for Hardwood Paroxysm has an look at positions by shot selection: "[W]e find that Miami Heat point guard Carlos Arroyo deviates the most from the shot selection of a traditional point guard.  In particular, 65.3 percent of his shots come from long twos and he barely attacks the basket or launches from downtown.  His z-scores total to 8.19 which is the highest sum of the point guard bunch.  Perhaps is good that he doesn’t attack the basket, as he only converts on 47.8 percent of his tries which is far below new Charlotte Bobcat Shaun Livingston’s 71.4 percent success rate."
  • Aileen Voison of the Sac Bee: "A few hours before Israeli and Palestinian leaders met in Washington, D.C., Thursday in the latest movement toward peace in the Middle East, Omri Casspi placed himself on the fringes of the conversation. At the Peres Center for Peace youth sports camp Wednesday in Jaffa, Israel, he supervised drills. He answered questions about Kobe Bryant. He scrimmaged with a girls team against a boys squad consisting of Israeli and Palestinian youngsters. Sounding at times like a diplomat and on other occasions like a coach, the Kings' second-year forward spoke about unity and tolerance. He stressed the cultural, ethnic and political diversity of the Kings. He left the community center, he said, encouraged and better educated." 
  • Steve Buffery of the Toronto Sun with some strong words for Steve Nash: "Hardly anyone talks about Steve Nash and the fact that the 2000 Olympic Games hero refuses to play for Canada now, even though he's still a great player. Yes, he has chronic physical issues, as do many other veteran players who pull on the jerseys for their country at international events. And, yes, he only has a few good years left in the NBA and wants to maximize his abilities in that regard. But, again, the same can be said for other, particularly European, veterans who play in the NBA. But consider this: Canada Basketball undoubtedly would have bent over backwards to get Nash on the team. I know for a fact they would have allowed him to arrive at training camp whenever he was ready. They would have limited his minutes to what he saw fit. Hell, they probably would have lobbied to have a street named after him. But, no, never a discouraging word is said about the man. Speaking out against Steve Nash is like speaking out against Motherhood in this country. Nash is a wonderful person and had given a lot to Canada Basketball the last few years. But you have to wonder why everyone, including Canada Basketball officials, are so reluctant to knock the Golden Boy, even just a little bit, for turning his back on the program and the country. It's not like he spent the entire summer lying on his sore back."
  • Bucksketball wonders if Milwaukee should worry about Andrew Bogut: "And even if he misses some time in October or November, better that then have Bogut battling issues all season.  The Bucks will do their best to make sure their franchise big man is in good physical standing for season, even if they keep the details to themselves.  If it’s late November and reports on Bogut are still muddied and unclear?  Yeah, then it’s time to grab a life jacket and jump ship.  But until then, let’s all stay on the ship and try not to get sick."
  • Hey Jazz fans, aren't you so fired up for Francisco Elson? You're not? Well, why not!?!?
Posted on: September 2, 2010 9:12 am
Edited on: September 2, 2010 9:47 am
 

Shootaround 9.2.10: Kevin Love and racial cliches

Posted by Royce Young
  • Kevin Ding of the O.C. Register writes that Byron Scott will one day coach the Lakers: "When you consider just how deeply and openly Scott is tied to the Lakers, not waiting and seeing makes little sense – until you understand that's exactly why he isn't waiting: Scott knows the Lakers so well that he trusts this isn't his only opportunity. And he's right. Scott will still be the Lakers' head coach someday, just not next year."
  • Matt Moore asked if the Knicks could make the playoffs yesterday and Toney Douglas says he'll be the man to lead them there: "Definitely," Douglas told The NY Post yesterday at Hayground School in Bridgehampton. "I feel like have a lot of talent. We just all have to be on one page and make sure everybody is totally on it. I feel we are a playoff team."
  • The Grizzlies are trying to let their fans knows they're serious: "The Grizzlies want fans to know that this season -- their 10th in Memphis -- is the one to really believe in. And the franchise is sending the message with a full-court billboard campaign. More than 80 billboards featuring Griz players were unveiled Wednesday in the Mid-South as the team attempts to generate more enthusiasm for the upcoming season."
  • Andre Iguodala, writing for the Philadelphia Daily News, says he's a little homesick: "(Yesterday) was really the first time I've thought about being away from home as long as I have. The reason is because they have been treating us so well ever since we left. We have a chef from Detroit who makes us some great stuff, we have a Nike suite that we all hang out in after games. All the guys on the team have gotten along really well so it doesn't seem so much like we're so far away from home, it's more like a long road trip in the NBA. There really can be no complaints. In Greece, the food was just OK, but in Spain we found restaurants that we liked and all is cool here."
  • Ben Polk of A Wolf Among Wolves hits the nail on the head: "Love tends to draw the kind of praise that we’ve come to understand as racially coded cliches. In the Worlds, Fran Fraschilla (who I should say right out front is a terrific analyst who understands the hell out of international basketball) busted out the full complement: Love is “your perfect teammate,” he is “smart” and “hardworking” and “unselfish”. These make him sound just like an unathletic, Big Ten white dude and I confess that they are part of the reason that I was a little disappointed when the Wolves picked him up. I mean, weren’t you just sick to death of hearing about how great an outlet passer this guy was?"
Posted on: August 27, 2010 9:01 am
Edited on: August 27, 2010 9:05 am
 

Shootaround 8.27.10: Chicken Nuggets

Posted by Royce Young
  • Mark Kiszla of The Denver Post: "The task of receiving anywhere near market value for Anthony in trade only figures to be more difficult with a growing perception the 6-foot-8 Denver forward is more interested in winning an Oscar than an NBA title. As a league executive told me: Anthony used to bleed basketball. But if you opened him up now and looked inside, what could be found closest to the player's heart? A love of the game? Or the desire to be a Hollywood star?"
  • Jeremy Wagner of Roundball Mining Company: "I know most observers are saying the Nuggets are going to fail to get equal value for Carmelo, and they are right.  There is just no way around that fact. I strongly believe Denver is in a better position than everyone realizes.  There will be competition between the Knicks, Nets, Rockets and Clippers. The Knicks, Nets are desperate to make a big move and acquire a marquee player.  The Clippers are just a notch below that level. I can see Donald Sterling convincing himself that this is his chance to make a run at the Lakers and doing everything he could to acquire Melo."
  • Howard Beck of the New York Times: "With Fields signed, the Knicks’ roster is essentially set. They have 14 players with guaranteed contracts and no immediate plans to fill the final vacancy. (Center Jerome Jordan, another second-round pick, will begin his career in Serbia. The Knicks retain his rights.) A handful of players will be brought to camp on partial guarantees and perhaps compete for the 15th spot."
  • Steve Nash talking to the Arizona Republic: "It disappointed me because we were close and we're going to miss a big piece, but I think Robert went to or beyond where anybody could ask him to go," Nash said. "This franchise would suffer a severe risk if Amar'e ever got hurt, so I understand why the last two years were guaranteed only if he played 22 minutes a game. I can't fault Robert for that. I can't blame Amar'e. He got that money guaranteed. It's just a shame."
  • D-League Digest continues on with grading teams use of the D-League. I find the differences fairly fascinating.
Posted on: August 25, 2010 8:56 am
Edited on: August 25, 2010 8:59 am
 

Shootaround 8.25.10: Damp in Miami?

Posted by Royce Young
  • If you didn't watch "Jordan Rides the Bus" last night, make sure to catch one of its 500 re-runs. Absolutely terrific stuff. My favorite tweet of the night about it though came from SLAM's Russ Bengtson: "Kobe's calling the Dodgers right now."
  • Bobcats GM Rod Higgins says Erick Dampier might be traded rather than waived: "It's going to take a while," Higgins said. "Now that we've got another center, waiving him for the sake of waiving him doesn't make a whole lot of sense for us. We're going to continue to talk to teams to try to improve our roster."
  • Want to watch the best dunk-off of all time? Watch the best dunk-off of all time:
  • Brett Hainline of Queen City Hoops on Kwame Brown: "Kwame's signing puts the Bobcats at 4 centers on the squad - one of whom I have confidence in taking a shot that is not a dunk (take a bow, Nazr). While it was certain the Bobcats are going to waive/trade Dampier, this makes it appear unlikely that he will be re-signed following his eventual waiving, as he had previously indicated an interest in doing."
  • Matt Hubert of D-League Digest writing on Hornets 24/7 about Mustafa Shakur: "But the biggest takeway from this signing is the fact that the Hornets appear to be turning over a new leaf under new general manager Dell Demps, formerly of the Austin Toros. His D-League experience may prove to open new doors for an organization that previously had very little involvement with the D-League, and the signing of Shakur could be just the beginning."
  • John Krolik of PBT with an outstanding breakdown of LeBron James off the ball: "According to Synergy Sports, LeBron took 125 field goal attempts off of a "cut" last season, and converted 101 of those attempts. That's an 81% conversion rate. That, folks, is the definition of unstoppable, and that's how LeBron shot 65% from the field in international play. LeBron is great at scoring in isolation or pick-and-roll situations. He may be just as good at making plays for other in those situations. But he's unquestionably at his most effective when he can build up a head of steam and attack the rim against a defense that isn't waiting for him."
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com