Tag:Hall of Fame
Posted on: February 18, 2011 10:06 am
Edited on: February 18, 2011 11:30 am
 

Report: Reggie Miller denied for HOF finalist

Report: Reggie Miller fails to make cut for Hall of Fame finalists despite stellar career. 
Posted by Matt Moore

Indiana is not having an awesome sports stretch. Watched Duke best local heroes Butler in the Final Four, just months after watching Drew Brees do his thing on Peyton Manning. But nothing is really going to match the outrage that's likely raging across the Hoosier State this morning. 

The New York Times and Yahoo! Sports report that Reggie Miller failed to make the cut of finalists for the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame. Which is, you know, kind of insane. 

Miller held the all-time record for three-pointers until a week ago when Ray Allen rained down. Miller played 18 seasons, all for the Pacers, back when guys still played their entire career for small-market teams. He was a 5-time All-Star, an Olympic Gold Medal winner, and is 17th All-Time in points scored in his career. Throw in all the huge moments, the fact that he's the reason we use the phrase "8 points, 9 seconds" (not just a blog, friends!) and make choking signs at Spike Lee, it's really hard to see where the voters were coming from on this one. 

The other candidates certainly had some worthy selections. Tex Winters, Dennis Rodman, Don Nelson,  Rudy Tomjanovich, and Dick Bavetta, and Spencer Haywood are all strong candidates. But outside of Winters and Nelson, who provided long-term contributions to the game that can't be replicated, is any of those candidates necessarily more worthy than Miller? Rodman is a top-three rebounder of all time, if not the best, but is also more known for his... ahem, eccentricities and was able to mosey on over to ride Jordan's coattails to titles. Hard to pinpoint that Miller wasn't his superior in overall play. 

The knock on Miller always comes back to the idiotic championship question. As if a player's singular talents can impact the dozens of things necessary for a player to win a championship including but not nearly limited to luck. We're not even talking about actually being voted in, here, we're just talking about making the cut. Voters didn't think that Reggie Miller, despite his place in the game's history, had enough to even warrant being a finalist. It is at this point we're reminded that no Hall of Fame is run under an adequate system.

Miller's numbers don't leap off the page, a career 18, 3, and 3 guy. But in his peak he was what made the Pacers a Finals contender and right up until his final season, he was part of what made the Pacers contenders. 

But that's all for naught, as he'll have to wait another year. 
Posted on: November 30, 2010 2:11 pm
 

A look at the 2011 Hall of Fame candidates

Posted by Royce Young

Nominees for the 2011 Basketball Hall of Fame were released Tuesday and while the list is strong, there's just one slam dunk. And it's a guy that didn't do much of that, but instead holds the NBA record for most 3-pointers made (2560) and attempted (6486).

Reggie Miller heads the 2011 candidates with his first appearance on the ballot. Miller spent all 18 years of his NBA career with the Indiana Pacers, was selected to five All-Star teams, led the league in free throw shooting five times and was a two-time gold medalist in the 1994 World Championships and 1996 Olympics.

Nobody was more deadly from outside with even a breath of space than Miller, whose eight points in nine seconds is still one of the most incredible NBA feats of all-time.

Miller is pretty much a lock for the 2011 class, but who could join him? As Scott Howard-Cooper of NBA.com pointed out, with the lighter class this year, some players that have been overlooked in years past might have a better shot this time around. A few of note:

Mark Jackson:
He's third on the all-time assists list and after being left off the final ballot in his first shot at it. I think Jackson will probably end up being sort of basketball's Jim Rice. A qualified candidate that deserves to eventually be in, but someone that might have to wait a while.

Chris Mullin: Remember, the Basketball Hall of Fame isn't the NBA Hall of Fame. Not that Mullin didn't have a nice NBA career, but he's probably one of the greatest college basketball players ever. At St. John's he was a Wooden Award winner and All-American. And in the NBA, he was a five-time All-Star, was part of the 1992 Dream Team and the 1996 gold medal team, plus averaged 25 points a game for five straight years. But as mentioned by Howard-Cooper, Mullin has been a finalist the past four years and if he makes that list again this year but doesn't get in, he'll have to wait five years to be nominated again.

Don Nelson: At some point, Don Nelson is a sure-thing Hall of Famer. He's the NBA's all-time winningest coach and wouldn't you know it, just finished up his career in basketball (for now, at least). He wasn't the most beloved coach in NBA history but you can't ignore a guy that's on top of a list. Especially a list like "Most Wins Ever." That's kind of a big deal.

Bernard King: I'll be honest - I kind of assumed he already was a Hall of Famer. But because of injuries, King didn't finish with the type of gaudy career stats he otherwise would have. I think we should make a Sandy Koufax-ish exception here and put King in. He's one of the very best pure scorers the game has ever seen and when you're mentioned as one of the best at something, that's Hall of Fame material. And with the weak nominees, maybe this is his year.

Dennis Rodman: If it were all about what happened on the court, Rodman is a no-brainer. Maybe the game's most pure rebounder ever (led the league for seven straight seasons), a defensive wizard that was named to eight consecutive first or second All-Defense teams and a multiple-time champion, Rodman has a Hall of Fame resume. But of course there's the issue of his personality and who is and was off the court. When you're talking about people voting you in, that's an important aspect and something Rodman may not pass. Rodman wasn't even a finalist last season though and in this class if he doesn't make it, it might not look so hot for him in the future.

Maurice Lucas: Honestly, I'd hate for him to get in now. I just hate for great players to be inducted into the Hall of Fame after passing. It just sucks that they can't be a part of that great honor. But his family would surely treasure the honor and as a player, Lucas was as gritty and tough a guy this league's ever seen. Bill Walton called him the best player on the 1979 championship team and because of his recent passing, there might be a chance Lucas gets some sentimental votes. Not that he wouldn't deserve it otherwise though, because he really was a great player.

Other nominees include Jamaal Wilkes, Rudy Tomjanovich, Cotton Fitzsimmons, Tex Winter, Spencer Haywood, Maurice Cheeks, Ralph Sampson, Bill Fitch, referee Dick Bavetta, Rick Pitino, Joe B. Hall, Jim Valvano, George Raveling and Marty Blake, the long-time head of the NBA scouting bureau.

Chet Walker was nominated by the Veteran's committee. Arvydas Sabonis and Sarunas Marciulionis are candidates from the International committee (two very deserving nominees), while Tara VanDerveer and Teresa Edwards will be candidates from the Women's committee.

Nominees must receive approval on at least seven of nine ballots in the North American group, and five of seven in the others, to become a finalist, cuts that will be announced at All-Star weekend. Finalists will need to receive at least 18 of 24 votes from a different panel -- the names of voters are never released -- to be announced at the Final Four as an inductee.
Posted on: August 10, 2010 9:15 am
Edited on: August 10, 2010 11:45 am
 

Shootaround 8.10.10: LeBron goes on rides

Posted by Matt Moore
  • In a fitting retrospective of their careers , Michael Jordan will introduce Scottie Pippen at Friday's Hall of Fame induction ceremony.  Hopefully Jordan won't stop to make time to list off the remainders on his personal hitlist like last year. Pippen's speech is expected to be more of the traditional Hall of Fame speech, filled with gratitude toward teammates and humility. Though from what we know of Scottie, anything's possible.
  • Steve Nash has entered into business with a new firm merging venture capital and brand management. It's yet another indication that Nash's influence likely won't stop when his playing days are through. Nash has diversified his interests into business, charities, media, the works.
  • The NBA's overseas expansion continues, as the Raptors and Nets will play two regular season games in London next season. It's a fine effort for the league to try and grab some headlines with and to expand its global presence, but it's a back to back with an overseas flight bookending the games. That's going to wreak havoc on those team's schedules. Even with the low expectations for those two teams this year, that's a rough turn.
  • Donnie Walsh's contract must be extended by March 11th, 2011 . The Knicks will decide on whether to extend Walsh for that fourth year by then. Keep that in mind with all this talk of Isiah Thomas returning to the fold.
  • Eric Musselman has been tabbed as the Reno Bighorns' newest coach in the NBA D-League. Musselman was a D-League commentator last year for Versus.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com