Play Fantasy The Most Award Winning Fantasy game with real time scoring, top expert analysis, custom settings, and more. Play Now
 
Tag:LaMarcus Aldridge
Posted on: December 15, 2011 2:09 pm
Edited on: December 15, 2011 2:12 pm
 

Jamal Crawford to sign 2-year deal with Blazers

Posted by Ben Golliverjamal-crawford-blazers

A lengthy courtship has come to fruition. 

SI.com reports and Ken Berger of CBSSports.com confirms that unrestricted free agent guard Jamal Crawford has chosen to sign a 2-year contract worth $10 million with the Portland Trail Blazers. The second year of the deal will be on a player's option.

Crawford posted a Twitter mesage shortly thereafter: "rip City!!!"

To legally make that offer, Portland must move below the luxury tax line so that they are able to re-acquire their full Mid-Level Exception. That could come via a massive salary dump in a trade or by using the amnesty clause on guard Brandon Roy, who recently announced his decision to pursue a medical retirement because of multiple knee injuries. 

Back in November, Crawford told CBSSports.com that the interest between himself and the Blazers was mutual. Members of the Blazers, including franchise forward LaMarcus Aldridge, had been aggressively recruiting Crawford, a Seattle native, to add depth to Portland's backcourt, which took a hit with the loss of Roy a trade that sent backup guard Rudy Fernandez to the Dallas Mavericks on the night of the 2011 NBA Draft.

Crawford, 31, averaged 14.2 points and 3.2 assists for the Atlanta Hawks last season and was named the NBA's sixth man in 2010. The Hawks, after dishing out big dollar deals to guard Joe Johnson and big man Al Horford, and with forward Josh Smith on the books for big money already, opted not to offer Crawford an extension.
Posted on: December 10, 2011 2:18 am
Edited on: December 10, 2011 2:24 am
 

LaMarcus Aldridge undergoes heart procedure

Posted by Ben Golliverlamarcus-aldridge-por

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Bad things happen in threes.

The Portland Trail Blazers announced on Friday that forward LaMarcus Aldridge underwent a successful ablation procedure to correct a recurring problem with his heart.  
Portland Trail Blazers forward/center LaMarcus Aldridge underwent a successful procedure today to evaluate the status of the electrical system in his heart, it was announced today by the team. He will be sidelined for 5-7 days before he can return to practice. Aldridge, who was diagnosed with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome in 2007, underwent a similar procedure to correct the problem at the time of diagnosis.  
Aldridge's diagnosis and procedure occurred on the same day that the Blazers confirmed that guard Brandon Roy would pursue a medical retirement and that center Greg Oden had suffered a "setback" in his rehabilitation from a Nov. 2009 microfracture that puts his availability during the 2011-2012 season into question.

Blazers Acting GM Chad Buchanan told reporters on Friday that Aldridge visits a cardiologist annually for testing and that an analysis of his stress echo exam revealed the need for an ablation procedure that "eradicated an extra node" in Aldridge's heart. 

"Going through his appointment with his routine check-up today they found a recurrence of that so they addressed that today," Buchanan said. "We expect LaMarcus to be back within a week or two weeks. The doctors feel really good about things. Obviously it's a little disappointing for LaMarcus but we're very optimistic that he'll be back on the court here in a short amount of time."

Despite the relatively good news, Buchanan admitted he had been extremely nervous. 

"Obviously LaMarcus was a scare," Buchanan said. "I'm not going to lie about that."

Aldridge, 26, was widely regarded as a 2011 All-Star snub, averaging a career-high 21.8 points and 8.8 rebounds per game.

"Thanks for the support everybody," Aldridge tweeted on Friday night. "I'm feeling better and will be ready to go in a few days."

The Blazers open the season on Dec. 26, when they host the Philadelphia 76ers. Aldridge's current timeline means he should be ready in time for opening night. 

Aldridge sat out the balance of the 2006-2007 season, his rookie year, when the Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome diagnosis was first made. 
Posted on: November 7, 2011 4:36 pm
Edited on: November 7, 2011 4:59 pm
 

Jamal Crawford says Blazers' interest is mutual

Posted by Ben Golliverjamal-crawford-hawks

PORTLAND, Ore. -- Portland Trail Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge has been openly recruiting free agent guard Jamal Crawford for weeks. On Sunday, Aldridge capped off that recruitment by hosting Crawford's official visit to Portland during the Rip City Basketball Classic charity game, held at the University of Portland's Chiles Center. s

Aldridge's plan had been carefully laid. Two weeks ago, he urged Blazers fans on Twitter to make Crawford "feel at home so he will sign with us!" Shortly thereafter, Miami Heat forward LeBron James began his own recruitment of Crawford, prompting Aldridge to write to James: "How are you going to try and steal Jamal Crawford from us?! I already told Portland to make him feel at home on the 6th."

Later, he told The Oregonian that the recruitment wasn't just a social media stunt.

"I would love for him to come play in Portland," Aldridge told the paper. "I put it out there so he knows I'm serious. If he really wants to do that, I wanted him to know I'm behind it." 

Aldridge even went so far as to stack the rosters so that Crawford would line up alongside Aldridge and fellow Blazers Raymond Felton and Wesley Matthews. All that work paid off.

During pre-game warm-ups on Sunday night, Crawford told CBSSports.com that the Blazers' interest in him is mutual.

"Yeah, definitely," Crawford said. "I've been watching the Blazers so long with Brandon [Roy] being one of my best friends. With LaMarcus here, Wes and Ray, it's almost close to a hometown team. I'm from Seattle. It's the closest thing we have to baketball right now." 

Crawford, 31, averaged 14.2 points and 3.2 assists for the Atlanta Hawks last season and was named the NBA's sixth man in 2010. The Hawks, after dishing out big dollar deals to guard Joe Johnson and big man Al Horford, and with forward Josh Smith on the books for big money already, opted not to offer Crawford an extension. 

"I think I would bring a little bit of everything to Portland," Crawford said. "Scoring, creating for other people. Trying to make the game easier for my teammates... I think they're a team on the rise."

That assessment was right in line with Aldridge's thought process. 

"He's a really good player," Aldridge told The Oregonian. "He doesn't mind coming off the bench. Or starting. He can bring a different dynamic to the team. He's great at pick and rolls; he's a really good shooter. When I get double teamed, it would leave him open in the corner."

Portland's backcourt currently includes Felton, who pencils in as the starting point guard, rookie Nolan Smith, who will likely be his backup and Patty Mills and Armon Johnson, who are expected to battle for third-string honors. At two guard, Matthews stepped into a starting role last year as Roy underwent dual knee surgeries but Roy promised to fight for his starting spot during exit interviews. It's possible, though, that the Blazers would use the Amnesty Clause to waive Roy. Sophomore Elliot Williams, who missed all of the 2010-2011 season after knee surgeries, is also on the roster.

"Starting, coming off the bench, it doesn't really matter to me," Crawford said.

With both Roy and Matthews locked into long-term deals, and with the Blazers stuck in the luxury tax last season, it's difficult to imagine they will have sufficient money to pay Crawford or minutes available to play him if Roy remains on the roster. Despite the roster jam and money drain, Crawford said that he felt that he and Roy could actually play in the same backcourt together, with Crawford defending point guards and Roy defending off guards.

"We've always talked about that," Crawford said. "We play together in the summer all the time, so we've always talked about that."
 
Aldridge's home team took home a 164-157 win in Sunday night's exhibition, with Crawford throwing down a put-back dunk in the final minute to secure the victory. Crawford finished with 18 points, 10 assists, eight rebounds, a block and a steal. He drew plenty of cheers from the sold out crowd of 5,000 fans. Roy, who was scheduled to play, did not attend the game, and Aldridge said that Roy was absent because he was attending to a family matter.
Posted on: October 26, 2011 1:19 pm
 

Aldridge trying to woo Crawford to Blazers?

By Matt Moore

LaMarcus Aldridge was on Twitter Tuesday night, discussing his upcoming charity game. (Everyone gets a charity game this summer/fall. "You get an All-Star charity game! And you get an All-Star charity game!") In the course of it, Jamal Crawford came up. Then suddenly, it turned into a discussion of talking Crawford, an unrestricted free agent when the lockout ends, into coming to Portland. 
Rip City when @JCrossover come play in my game we need to make him feel at home so he will sign with us!
via Twitter / @aldridge_12: Rip City when @JCrossover ....

Crawford responded positively to the comments on his own Twitter account, and is from Seattle, so he's got a connection to the Northwest. He was also rumored to be targeted by former Blazers GM Rich Cho last year in trade talks.  So on the surface, this makes a lot of sense. Crawford wants to go somewhere he feels wanted, and Portland would definitely make him feel that way. 

Just one problem.

It's a terrible idea. The Blazers have nearly... wait for it... $90 million  invested in Brandon Roy and Wesley Matthews over the next four seasons. With Gerald Wallace the small forward for their indefinite future (even if he's playing power-forward with LMA at center in smaller lineups, he functions as a small forward), you're looking at pouring quite a bit of money into Crawford, who is coming off of a sensational playoff appearance with Atlanta, and who plays at a position that generally is overpaid in the first place (volume-scorer shooting guard). 

Paul Allen is stomping up and down the NBA lockout negotiations because of his desire to curb salaries. But the Blazers' history, from overpaying for Wesley Matthews at the time (a move that worked out and looks reasonable for the duration of his contract, provided his production maintains with more minutes) to granting Brandon Roy the extension despite knowing the condition of his knees, points to a pattern of overpaying for marginal contributions. Crawford is 31. He'll still be a solid contributor at both ends for whoever winds up signing him, but even if Brandon Roy is given the amnesty, which seems unlikely given the franchise's position towards Roy, adding Crawford doesn't add up. And that's before we explore the money likely given to Greg Oden in restricted free agency.

Also, note that this is LaMarcus Aldridge, who has historically had an icy relationship with Brandon Roy, actively campaigning for what would essentially be his replacement. Maybe LMA thinks Crawford will play small forward in a small lineup with Wallace at the 4. But that's an awful lot of shots to have to go around should he get his way.  
Posted on: October 24, 2011 12:26 pm
 

Does the league care about competitive balance?

Posted by Royce Young



The NBA wants you to believe something. We’re fighting for the little man. We’re sticking up for the small market team that can’t fend for itself.

That’s what Deputy Commissioner Adam Silver hammered home this week while basically announcing that the league is screwed right now.

“I know we’ve had lots of back and forth with people in this room, but we think that a team that spends $100 million on its payroll versus a team that spends $50 million is at a huge competitive advantage. It’s not a perfect one-to-one correlation, but there’s a huge competitive advantage that comes from the ability to spend more time. And there’s a reason we believe why the NFL has been so successful from a competitive standpoint with a hard cap and a reason that the NHL has been so successful from a competitive standpoint with their flex cap type system which has a hard, absolute cap at the top of the band.”

Before that, David Stern went on and on during his media blitz about how the Sacramento Kings are trying to live in a world where they spend $45 million to the Lakers $100 million. It isn’t fair. No way around it. It’s not. Historically, the trophies live in the big markets. Chicago, New York, Boston, Los Angeles — over the past 60 years, 36 championships were won by those cities (40 if you count the four won by the Minneapolis Lakers). Four cities accounted for 60 percent of the NBA’s champions since 1950. There’s never, ever been a precedent for competitive balance in the NBA. Never has the playing field been level.

And has the league grown? Has it succeeded? Yes and yes. Most would say the top of the mountain for the NBA was the 1990s with Michael Jordan and the Bulls. Or if not that, the 1980s with Magic’s Lakers battling Bird’s Celtics. Or if not that, maybe right now with the plethora of talent littered throughout the league.

This isn’t to say small markets haven’t ever won. There’s the Spurs, who have served as the beacon of hope for little guys. Except remember: When those boring Spurs were winning, that was kind of a dark time for the league. Scoring was down, ratings slipped and interest waned. That could’ve been because of a post-Jordan hangover, but the 2000s weren’t great for the league.

LaMarcus Aldridge, who plays in a small market, wouldn't speculate on what the league's real intentions are.

"If they're saying it, then hopefully they're trying to do it," he said after Sunday's charity game in Oklahoma City.

Which is kind of what you have to think with it. If they're saying it, then hopefully they really mean it.

But even with the league preaching that, I get the feeling it’s a red herring to divert attention away from the fact the owners are trying to squeeze the players out of a 20 percent (or so) paycut. It’s the owners’ version of “Let us play!” Preach fairness and tug at the heartstrings of small market fans to win support. All while reaching in the back pocket of the players. Preach parity and win public support. It’s a brilliant move. Maybe they mean it this time, but the league’s never really cared much for competitive balance, so why now? With proper revenue sharing, big market success often leads to more small market money. Or at least, more money and more success for the NBA. Which is what it’s really all about, right?

"I just want the fans to trust us and know that we're far from greedy," Chris Paul said following the charity game. "We just want a fair deal. We want to get out there and play more than anybody. But we understand that at the end of the day, we're the product. We're the reason the fans come and we just want a fair deal.”

The league though, says it wants to make life fair for a team like Paul's Hornets (which it happens to own, but nevermind that). The league wants to give equal opportunity to everybody not in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles or Boston. Last season's champion Mavericks? They had a payroll upwards of $90 million. That would never happen in Sacramento, Minnesota or Oklahoma City, where all the stars gathered Sunday.

The Thunder have become a poster child for parity, the beacon of hope to every struggling small market franchise. Before them were the Spurs. Even playing against the system, both teams built a perennial contenders. Why? Brilliant management, shrewd financial discipline and a good amount of luck.

Luck? Yeah, don’t deny it. OKC's general manager Sam Presti’s done wonderful work in the draft, but let’s face it: He drafted No. 2, 4 and 3 in 2007, 2008 and 2009. In 2007, he snagged the fifth pick in Jeff Green. Kevin Durant fell in his lap after Portland whiffed on Greg Oden. Now to Presti’s credit — and you won’t find anyone that sings his praises louder and more often than me — he’s three-for-three. Where other general managers pick duds — Hasheem Thabeet, Oden, Michael Beasley, O.J. Mayo — Presti has taken players that not only fit well into his roster structure, but have develop-able talent.

The Thunder thrive on rookie contracts and high-value veteran. Why? Because it’s the cheapest labor there is. There’s no coincidence that on every “underpaid NBA stars” list the Thunder register three or four players. The question is though: What happens with Serge Ibaka and James Harden? After Durant and Westbrook see their paydays, will Clay Bennett have the pockets to keep Ibaka and Harden too? If the Thunder were in Los Angeles or New York, it would happen. Will it in OKC?

Once upon a time, Geoff Petrie was Mr. Genius in Sacramento when he was rolling with Chris Webber. Kevin McHale drafted Kevin Garnett in for the Wolves and built a playoff contender. Eventually the well runs dry. At some point, Tim Duncan’s going to retire. And the Spurs will either reload or have to go through some small market pains.

(The opposite example has been the Knicks over the past decade though. Tons of money, tons of spending and tons of futility. Money doesn’t always equal wins. Management does. The league is cyclical. Sometimes your team is good, sometimes it’s not. Do the big markets have an advantage? Sure. But does it always matter? Nope. Do I like asking myself questions? Sometimes.)

But it’s worked so far in Oklahoma City. It worked in San Antonio. Which is why some are quick to wonder why it can’t work in Sacramento, Minnesota or Milwaukee. Why? Because there aren’t 10 Tim Duncans. There aren’t 10 Kevin Durants. And there sure as hell aren’t 10 Sam Prestis or R.C. Bufords. It’s the world we live in — some people are better at things than others. And when you’re better, you see success. Are organizations like the Thunder, Spurs, Wolves and Bucks at a competitive disadvantage? Sure they are. But is it a death sentence for mediocrity? Absolutely not. History says it’s harder to win, but it’s not impossible.

History also says the league doesn't really care. The league always has and always will look to do what's best for it, and its owners as a collective whole. Henry Abbott of TrueHoop put it well: “Instead, the league asks us all to celebrate competitive balance—so long as the pain of creating it is felt primarily by the players. When owners could do something real to make the league more competitive, like change the playoff format or pay Chris Paul far more on the open market, they lose interest.”

What does the league want this upcoming season? An NBA Finals featuring the Celtics and Lakers or a competitively balanced Finals with the Bucks and Kings. I think we all know the answer to that. Don't sell me on looking on for the little man, because we all know what you're really after -- getting your checkbooks competitively balanced.

Posted on: October 24, 2011 12:21 am
Edited on: October 24, 2011 12:26 am
 

Players talk lockout after OKC charity game

Posted by Royce Young



OKLAHOMA CITY -- Oklahoma City got as close as it'll probably ever be to an All-Star Game Sunday with stars like LeBron James, Chris Paul and Carmelo Anthony showing up for Kevin Durant's charity game. Durant's team -- included LeBron, Russell Westbrook and LaMarcus Aldridge -- topped Paul and Melo's squad 176-171 in a fairly exciting overtime game.

But there was always an unspoken theme to the game. It might've been a fun night featuring a hefty number of stars, but this game shouldn't have been happening. We're just over a week away from the actual tip of the NBA season and it's not going to be happening, at least not on Nov. 1. The players wanted to talk about charity and how fun it was to be playing hoops, but of course the topic of conversation after the game was the lockout.

Chris Paul put it this way: "We try to explain (the situation) as much as we can, but it's really hard to understand unless you're in the situation. But I just want the fans to trust us and know that we're far from greedy. We just want a fair deal. We want to get out there and play more than anybody. But we understand that at the end of the day, we're the product. We're the reason the fans come and we just want a fair deal.”

Paul isn't wrong. The players are certainly the product. Nearly 13,000 fans turned out in one of the league's smallest markets to watch a group of stars play in a completely meaningless game.

Durant was asked if games will be played by Christmas.

"I wish," he said. "But I really can't say right now. We're just trying to work to get a deal done. We're going to continue to play in these games and show the fans that we love the game and we want to play.”

Thunder guard James Harden was very matter-of-fact a few weeks ago when he said the players absolutely wouldn't drop below 53 percent in terms of revenue split. And he reaffirmed that position Sunday.

"No, no. Fifty-three. That's where we're staying at. We've had plenty of talks and we're not dropping," Harden said. "We already dropped and set our number at 53 so that's what we're sticking to."

Despite the hardline approach, Harden thinks it'll be settled soon.

“I'm definitely confident we're going to have a season. I just don't know when.”

Talks fell apart last week supposedly after Blazer owner Paul Allen intervened. LaMarcus Aldridge wouldn't comment about that or even expound on if Allen strikes him as the kind of owner willing to bring the hammer down.

"I can't really speak on that," he said. "It's not my place."

Fans are growing increasingly frustrated with the situation as games will officially be missed in 11 days. Paul was asked if he felt the same way.

"I don't know if frustrated is the right word. It's close," he said. "We just want to keep giving our fans an opportunity to see us. Because if not for the fans, we're not who were are. We just want them to know we still want to keep working towards a deal because it's not just about us. It's about the fans, it's about the employees, about all the people that makes our game happen. We want to play. Just want to make sure everyone understands that."

Said Rudy Gay: “We like playing these games for the fans, but we'd rather be doing our jobs. This is fun, but of course we want to get back to work. We're sorry to the fans for the long wait, but we're looking for a fair deal and that'll happen soon enough.”
Posted on: August 28, 2011 3:39 pm
 

LaMarcus Aldridge supports Blazers adding Landry

By Matt Moore

Earlier this month, Carl Landry said that he saw himself as a good fit in Portland.  It was odd considering they currently have LaMarcus Aldridge on roster and Landry is a power forward who struggles with rebounding.  He's got great scoring instincts and work ethic though, making him one of the better free agents when the market opens. 

Turns out someone with the Blazers thinks the same way. SLAM Online spoke to LaMarcus Aldridge and it turns out Aldridge thinks Landry would be a good fit as well. From SLAM:
“That’s big of him to speak out and I’m glad he spoke out and said he wants to play with us,” Aldridge told SLAMonline. “He’s a good player and I definitely feel like he can help us immediately.”

“Landry’s a really good player and good players know how to fit in,” Aldridge said. “Wouldn’t be a problem at all.”
via SLAM ONLINE | » Aldridge Signs Off on Landry

The problem? Let's pretend for a moment that the new CBA at least keeps things within scale. So either the Blazers are in the same position, cap-space-wise, or the contracts are scaled back proportionally. Let's take three contracts for next season, outside of their best player, LMA. Brandon Roy, Marcus Camby, Gerald Wallace. That's nearly $37.5 million. Wesley Matthews is $6.1 million.  In short, finding room for a back-up role player who will likely draw a better contract, even under a new CBA within a weaker free agency class than the last time he struck out might be tough for Portland. 

With the Blazers still trying to figure out a plan in terms of their organization, making a major move like Landry might be a longshot. But if it's made, Aldridge is out in front to quell any talk of issues with the should-be-All-Star. 

Here's a question? Who on earth is going to play power forward in New Orleans next year? 
Posted on: August 25, 2011 10:23 am
 

NBA Lockout Winners and Losers: August 2011



By Matt Moore


It seems weird doing a winners and losers list for a month in which nothing happened, right? I mean, the lockout's still on, no progress has been made, we're still well on track to lose games at least until January if not the whole season. If no negotiation has been made, how can anyone have won or lost? Much like the dispute itself, it's all in how you interpret the results and what your definition of "is" is.

Winners:

David Stern: Stern's appearance on ESPN's B.S. Report podcast was a stirring display of his verbal tactics. Every criticism rebuffed, every accusation shook until it's rendered meaningless. He managed to come across as someone who very much wants to get a deal done, but hampered by the economic realities he and the owners are facing. He admitted contraction is an option, giving a scare to those who oppose it (and no doubt giving those in favor of more stars in bigger markets something to salivate over), while also saying New Orleans would not be a candidate. Basically, he said, our condition is bad enough to warrant amputation, but no, not that leg, it's totally fine. That one, too. It was difficult to walk away from Stern's interview feeling anything but a sense that he's on the fan's side, and while that's not true, he's on the owners' side 100 percent, that comes down as a win here. Plus, he fit a vacation in during a lockout. That's just impressive.

Kevin Durant: Won the Drew-Goodman showdown. Continues to pour it on in every street park and Pro-Am he shows up for. Talking to foreign teams. Expanding his brand. Durant's done more than enough to bolster his reputation as a cold blooded killer during the lockout and is making himself into more of a name. He's backed up every endeavor with stellar play and has yet to be scored on by an Asian amateur. So he's got that going for him.

Kobe Bryant: Nails a Drew League game winner after dropping 40+, gave back to the video guys who helped the Lakers win two titles, 

Billy Hunter: Hunter managed to avoid a coup by the agents in an attempt to force the union's hand into decertification. He's held the line and has gotten through another month without the players fracturing or panicking. This was largely a defensive month for the players, and Hunter's goaltending has kept the match scoreless, at least according to some interpretations. Of course....

Losers:

Billy Hunter: Hunter also has allowed for questions about the direction of the league to surface, loudly, and seemed to have gotten schooled when the league filed pre-emptively in court to cut off the union's NLRB and bad faith arguments. The problem with not overreacting to your opponent's move is you take some unavoidable flak from the extremists in your contingent who demand radical action. Hunter makes both lists for the same reason. He hasn't reacted either way to the developments of the past month. His motto right now is keep calm and look for work in Europe. Oh, but he did give us this bit of happy sunshine news, he would bet on losing the season. Which is like the Fed chair saying "I'm just saying, the whole thing's coming down." 

LeBron James: James made fun of his hairline, did a world of charity work, isn't headed overseas and is instead focused on next season whenever it is, and hasn't gotten into the negotiations. Now, you may think not getting into the negotiations shows a lack of leadership, but it should also be mentioned that any attempt to do so would be seen as grandstanding by James. He's not popular with the players, not popular with the owners, not popular with the fans, he doesn't win by getting involved. So how is he a loser? Because no one's going to remember the charity works or the self-defacing attitude. They're just going to remember him getting dunked on by a Taiwanese player. Oh, and that he's scared of heights. (Note: There is no way I'm jumping off that thing and not just because I can't swim.)

LaMarcus Aldridge: LMA, you're not helping. No one wants your debbie downer act, even though you're totally on-target.

The economy: The NBA is a tiny slice of a big ol' pie going bad right now, but stuff like news that arena operators who aren't involved in the lockout directly could lose up to a billion dollars does show the depth and breadth of how this can affect every day business for thousands of people across the country. 

Besiktas: The Turkish club failed to land Kobe, hasn't secured Durant, still has questions about its funds, and oh, yeah, players are talking about Turkey like it's third-world. Not a great month for the Istanbul powerhouse. 

Personal assistants: Really, you guys can't get a handful of schedules to line up? Really? When you've known this was coming for months? Honestly?  
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com