Tag:Rick Carlisle
Posted on: July 15, 2011 2:49 pm
Edited on: July 15, 2011 2:58 pm
 

Mavs coach Rick Carlisle violates NBA gag order

Posted by Ben Golliver. rick-carlisle

Imagine winning an NBA title and not being able to soak in all the adulation. 

That's the predicament facing the Dallas Mavericks, who won the 2011 NBA Finals over the Miami Heat in June and then promptly saw the league enter a lockout July 1. With the lockout came a gag order and a threatened fine of $1 million on any team employee who mentions current players in public.

Thankfully, Mavericks owner Mark Cuban was able to get around the gag order during a recent awards ceremony, in which the NBA pre-cleared him to appear along with his players to accept an award.

Mavericks coach Rick Carlisle, however, may not be so lucky.

During an innocuous interview with 750 AM The Game in Portland, ESPNDallas.com notes that Carlisle discussed multiple members of the Portland Trail Blazers by name and made reference to a few of his own players as well.

What happened next?
The interview continues with neither party thinking gag-order violation flags were being thrown in New York. And so the conversation meandered on and at about 11 minutes in, as Carlisle is talking about how changes to NBA rules over the last decade have enhanced the game, he finishes a rambling thought by suddenly detouring to, "John, I'm sorry, I've got to run. I've got something I've got to do here." 

And that was that. 

Carlisle's abrupt exit spawned a new conversation about why he bailed so quickly. Was NBA Big Brother listening? 
Here we have another clear violation of the NBA's gag order policy just a few days after Minnesota Timberwolves president David Kahn discussed multiple members of his team at a press conference that announced the firing of coach Kurt Rambis.

The NBA has yet to issue a true comment publicly and has not yet levied a fine for either violation. A rule -- even a dumb one -- is only as good as its enforcement. The only conclusions we're left to reach are that either the NBA realizes its own rule is overly Draconian and is letting people slide or the hammer has yet to drop.  Either way, the silence and delay make the NBA look unorganized and unfocused.

Those are not words you want attached to your negotiating position during a labor negotiation.

As for Carlisle, you feel for the guy. This is unquestionably the pinnacle of his career. If any of us were in his shoes, we'd be doing 10 radio shows a day, soaking in all the congratulations and recounting our favorite moments from the dream ride. Those are the spoils that go to victors. Instead, he could very well have to write a check to the NBA for acknowledging the players who helped him get there. Brutal.
Posted on: June 21, 2011 4:30 pm
Edited on: June 21, 2011 5:21 pm
 

Video: Mavericks return home after winning title

Among the many reasons this NBA season and these NBA playoffs were incredible, the fact that the Mavericks -- who had never won a title -- won should be considered heavily as the favorite. This was no rote "just another title" to throw on a dynasty's pile, nor a coronation of a team expected to win. It was an organic title, the kind that everyone should pay more attention to in sports. From good team to great team to hot team in the playoffs and finally champion. 

And now we've got a nice video of what it was like after the Mavericks partied like a rock star on South Beach. Here's a video of them returning home to Dallas on the team flight. Highlights include:

  • Dirk working on the "We Are The Champions" rendition he did at the parade.
  • Caron Butler very excited despite his lack of playing time due to injury.
  • Jason Kidd with a simple "woo."
  • Rick Carlisle completely knocked out and sleeping the sleep of the victorious.
  • And a truly awesome "I'M THAT DUDE!"
 

But the best part of this video? This, right here:

 


That, friends, is priceless.

(HT: Earl Sneed on Twitter)
Posted on: May 31, 2011 10:23 pm
Edited on: May 31, 2011 10:24 pm
 

When should the NBA award its MVP?

Posted by Royce Young



MIAMI -- Amazing how public opinion can shift so quickly. During the regular season, most everyone agreed that Derrick Rose was everything an MVP should be. He led his team to the league's best record, carried them through injury and had a number of MVP-ish performances. There was debate but that largely stemmed from the stat-inclined community lashing out at Rose's Win Shares and plus-minus more than anything else.

But now, after Rose's unceremonious five-game exit where he was thoroughly outplayed by LeBron James, some are wondering: Why doesn't the MVP include the postseason?

"It's an idea that should get some traction," David Stern said before Game 1 of the NBA Finals. "I have no particular opinion on it one way or the other. And the worst answer I can give you is the truth -- it's always been done this way. That doesn't mean it's the best way to do it."

Rick Carlisle, who has a player on his team in Dirk Nowitzki that's made quite the postseason statement, said he likes the way the league does it now.

"I agree with the way they do it," he said. "And I believe the media does a good job of kind of keeping our fans informed of the difference between that award and whoever becomes the Finals MVP or the playoff MVP. I like it the way it is."

Obviously, as Carlisle points out, the Finals MVP sort of serves as a playoff MVP of sorts. But there's no doubt that in terms of legacy, a Finals MVP doesn't carry near the weight a regular MVP. Hench why this has been brought up. Some soured on Rose after what seemed to be a lackluster postseason and wanted to annoint someone new. And with the heightened level of play, visibility and importance of playoff games, some feel like a re-vote is in order.

"It's something we would consider if there was any momentum for it amongst the Competition Committee, our ownership," Stern said. "It's something we can always consider for next season."

Stern said that with sort of an air of, "Yeah, we're not really ever going to change it, but I'm answering your question as if we actually might." No sport awards its MVP to include the playoffs. Not even college athletics. It's pretty much commonplace to have the MVP given to the player that was best over the 82 games of the regular season.

If the MVP was given out after the playoffs, it would be natural though to just give it to the Finals MVP. That would be the lasting image in everyone's mind. For instance: Whoever plays better between Dirk and LeBron in this series would be the MVP. Worthy? Of course. But what about in a season like 2009 where LeBron was the obvious MVP, but Kobe Bryant won the Finals MVP? It seems like that would be a mistake to make that switch.

The last MVP to win a title came in 2003 when Tim Duncan took home both trophies. Of the 40 MVP winners, only 13 have won both. Which means I don't think we'd get a "true" MVP each season. In terms of weighing both the regular and postseason, at least.

What if you extrapolate a bit though? Should Coach of the Year be voted on after the season? Sixth Man? I mean, Jason Terry has been a much better sixth man than Lamar Odom was. It's understandable to get wrapped up in the importance of the playoffs and feel like the MVP should include that, but remember, in terms of the grand picture, the playoffs are only about 25 percent of an NBA season. More important? Definitely. But it doesn't tell the whole story.

Like Stern said though, it's worth the debate. When you see MVPs fizzle out like Rose to a better player in LeBron like this year, it makes you wonder.
Posted on: May 31, 2011 10:23 pm
Edited on: May 31, 2011 10:24 pm
 

When should the NBA award its MVP?

Posted by Royce Young



MIAMI -- Amazing how public opinion can shift so quickly. During the regular season, most everyone agreed that Derrick Rose was everything an MVP should be. He led his team to the league's best record, carried them through injury and had a number of MVP-ish performances. There was debate but that largely stemmed from the stat-inclined community lashing out at Rose's Win Shares and plus-minus more than anything else.

But now, after Rose's unceremonious five-game exit where he was thoroughly outplayed by LeBron James, some are wondering: Why doesn't the MVP include the postseason?

"It's an idea that should get some traction," David Stern said before Game 1 of the NBA Finals. "I have no particular opinion on it one way or the other. And the worst answer I can give you is the truth -- it's always been done this way. That doesn't mean it's the best way to do it."

Rick Carlisle, who has a player on his team in Dirk Nowitzki that's made quite the postseason statement, said he likes the way the league does it now.

"I agree with the way they do it," he said. "And I believe the media does a good job of kind of keeping our fans informed of the difference between that award and whoever becomes the Finals MVP or the playoff MVP. I like it the way it is."

Obviously, as Carlisle points out, the Finals MVP sort of serves as a playoff MVP of sorts. But there's no doubt that in terms of legacy, a Finals MVP doesn't carry near the weight a regular MVP. Hench why this has been brought up. Some soured on Rose after what seemed to be a lackluster postseason and wanted to annoint someone new. And with the heightened level of play, visibility and importance of playoff games, some feel like a re-vote is in order.

"It's something we would consider if there was any momentum for it amongst the Competition Committee, our ownership," Stern said. "It's something we can always consider for next season."

Stern said that with sort of an air of, "Yeah, we're not really ever going to change it, but I'm answering your question as if we actually might." No sport awards its MVP to include the playoffs. Not even college athletics. It's pretty much commonplace to have the MVP given to the player that was best over the 82 games of the regular season.

If the MVP was given out after the playoffs, it would be natural though to just give it to the Finals MVP. That would be the lasting image in everyone's mind. For instance: Whoever plays better between Dirk and LeBron in this series would be the MVP. Worthy? Of course. But what about in a season like 2009 where LeBron was the obvious MVP, but Kobe Bryant won the Finals MVP? It seems like that would be a mistake to make that switch.

The last MVP to win a title came in 2003 when Tim Duncan took home both trophies. Of the 40 MVP winners, only 13 have won both. Which means I don't think we'd get a "true" MVP each season. In terms of weighing both the regular and postseason, at least.

What if you extrapolate a bit though? Should Coach of the Year be voted on after the season? Sixth Man? I mean, Jason Terry has been a much better sixth man than Lamar Odom was. It's understandable to get wrapped up in the importance of the playoffs and feel like the MVP should include that, but remember, in terms of the grand picture, the playoffs are only about 25 percent of an NBA season. More important? Definitely. But it doesn't tell the whole story.

Like Stern said though, it's worth the debate. When you see MVPs fizzle out like Rose to a better player in LeBron like this year, it makes you wonder.
Posted on: May 9, 2011 2:16 pm
 

Lakers backing gently off "blow up" talk

Mitch Kupchak says not to worry too much about Magic's "blow it up" comments. But if not a complete self-destruction, is a major remodeling on the way,and how does a new coach fit into this?
Posted by Matt Moore




Sure, you were just swept out of the playoffs in what should have been the culmination of so much work, effort, and money spent in order to achieve a three-peat and send your expensive Hall of Fame coach out in style. Sure, your roster was relatively exposed as lackadaisical, lacking in focus, determination, heart, and eventually class. And yes, the idea has always been to reload when the shots don't quite hit their target, which is always championship gold. 

But the Lakers? They're not looking to follow Magic Johnson's advice and blow it up. Not yet, anyway. And not completely. 

From Sports Illustrated: 
(Lakers GM Mitch) Kupchak cautioned against the idea that Johnson's recent comments on ABC were an early indication of things to come. The Lakers' legend had all but written his favorite team off during his television analysis, then recommended Kupchak "blow it up" by trading one of his frontcourt players for Orlando's Dwight Howard as a means to keeping the dynasty intact.

Jackson called the comment "unnecessary" before tip-off, while Kupchak largely dismissed the notion raised by some fans that it was an in-house sentiment being shared publicly. Howard is believed to be eyeing the Lakers as a possible landing spot when he becomes a free agent in 2012, however, meaning this storyline won't be going away anytime soon.

"I thought Earvin was trying to motivate our players," Kupchak said. "He's great at cheering for us, and a lot of times saying stuff like he said can motivate a player to play harder. That's how I took it.

"I talk to Earvin from time to time, and I think Dr. Buss [owner Jerry Buss] does from time to time, and this moves too quickly for him to be intimately involved in what's going on day to day, so I would hesitate to think that was the case."
via Lakers fall apart against Mavericks in Phil Jackson's farewell - Sam Amick - SI.com.

Not surprising that Magic isn't plugged into the day to day ops, especially having sold his stake, despite retaining a front office position. But the question is whether the Lakers are correct in this train of thought. One issue that isn't being talked about here is pretty obvious. This roster was constructed to play for Phil Jackson. 

And that definitely won't be the case next season. 

From ESPN:
Jackson might've played coy in what was likely his final postgame press conference, joking "I haven't answered that, have I?" when pressed for a definitive statement on whether he'd coached his final NBA game Sunday. But Kupchack says he believes Jackson's decision to retire is final this time.

"I think this is it," Kupchak told ESPNLosAngeles after the Lakers were swept out of the playoffs by the Dallas Mavericks 122-86 on Sunday. "We'll sit down and talk, but I've gotten no indication that he won't retire.

"We just talked briefly and I thanked him for what he's done for the organization. It was a pleasure to work with him. Everybody who is a coach in this league works endless hours. I'm not going to say he works harder than any other coach in this league. He certainly works as hard as any of them.

"But he's different. He's got a feel that I think a lot of coaches don't have."
via Los Angeles Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak senses Phil Jackson set to retire - ESPN Los Angeles.

With Jackson gone, Brian Shaw is the favorite to get the Lakers' head coaching job. But after the abject meltdown that occured on a chemistry level, the job will probably be open to several applicants. ESPN also reports the job is "wide open" and with candidates like Jeff Van Gundy, Rick Adelman, and Larry Brown on the market, you have to think ownership will take a long look at its options. And if there is a change in the coaching line, the new coach will want players to fit his personnel. 

The question of Dwight Howard will come back around again and again this summer once the CBA is resolved (if it's resolved). In case you missed it in the fall of Rome, here's Ken Berger of CBSSports.com on Howard and the Lakers: 
Everybody knows that Dwight Howard wants to be a Laker," said a person familiar with the All-Star centers plans. "Theyre going to lose Dwight Howard for nothing. Hes not staying there. Dwight Howard is going to be in the same mode as LeBron James."

So would the Magic, facing the reality of losing their franchise cornerstone and getting nothing in return, accept Gasol and Odom, Bynum and Odom, or even Bynum and Gasol as the centerpiece of a Howard trade?"Probably," said a high-profile agent with a hand in past maneuverings for both teams.
via Fast-approaching offseason critical for Lakers - NBA - CBSSports.com Basketball.

Landing Howard would automatically put the Lakers back at the top of the contenders list, though they may be there anyway, even with the Dallas Meltdown. But it comes with its own set of issues, including giving the reins of a veteran club to a younger player. How's Kobe Bryant going to react to being the No.2 for the first time since the first W. Bush term in his final ride into the sunset? Will the Magic really want Andrew Bynum after he embarrassed himself, his family, and his organization with (another) needless foul that could have resulted in injury and will definitely result in his suspension for multiple games next year, along with his injury issues on a long contract? 

There's time for all this, and the Lakers will take it. They are unlikely to "blow it up" and more likely to simply try and pick their favorite from the NBA's buffet as in year's past. But deals like the Pau Gasol trade don't come along twice in a four-year span, and with the franchise tag a possibility to come out of the CBA, life may be significantly different for L.A. after the seconds ticked off the Phil Jackson era in Dallas. 

Things aren't as simple as pushing the "self-destruct" button and starting over. Even Athens fell, and an immediate return to glory isn't always guaranteed for those blessed by the Gods for so long. 

But I wouldn't bet against them.
Posted on: May 9, 2011 1:42 pm
Edited on: May 9, 2011 1:48 pm
 

Pau Gasol had a bad week

Pau Gasol loses fiance, has tension with Lakers, is swept from playoffs. Other than that, things aren't bad for the 7-foot Spaniard. 
Posted by Matt Moore




Let's take a look at Pau Gasol's week: 

  • Dumped by his long-time girlfriend: check. 
  • Challenged and pushed physically by Phil Jackson, who notoriously does not get up in player's faces or ever touch them during games: check.
  • Dominated against Euro 7-footer, exposing him as an inferior to Dirk Nowitzki: check.
  • Swept from playoffs in attempt for three-peat, and failed to send arguably the greatest coach in NBA history out on a high note: check.

Yeah, that's a pretty bad week. 

Gasol was reported to be upset with Kobe Bryant over his wife's involvement in Gasol's girlfriend's decision to break up with him earlier in the week. Gasol admitted there was some tension in the locker room, but also denied Bryant's involvement. It's not really worth pursuing, since it's none of our business and it doesn't change the result. It's understandable that Gasol would be upset about something in his personal life like that, but in the biggest series of the year for the Lakers, they needed their big man, and he wasn't there. It's a rough patch of luck, but you have to fight through it if you want to be a champion, as cliche as that sounds. 

Perhaps more important, though, is this point. Regardless of what was going on with Gasol, he still could have dominated had the Mavericks not played him so well. They sent effective doubles, brought help when he got to the corner, challenged his turnarounds enough to drive him too deep baseline, and stayed aggressive on the defensive boards to not allow those tip-ins.  Pau Gasol has a terrible week, one that has changed Laker fans' perception of him despite his pivotal role in the Lakers' two championships, but it should be noted that it was a two way street. Gasol fell apart when the Lakers needed him most, and the Mavericks did what they had to in order to take away the Lakers' second best player. 

If the last few weeks have been interesting for Gasol, the next few months could be even moreso. 
Posted on: May 7, 2011 9:44 pm
Edited on: May 7, 2011 9:49 pm
 

Kobe Bryant predicts series win over Mavericks

Lakers guard Kobe Bryant says he thinks Los Angeles can come back from a 3-0 series deficit to the Dallas Mavericks. Posted by Ben Golliver.

kobe-fail

The Los Angeles Lakers' season could end as soon as Sunday night. Down 3-0 to the Dallas Mavericks with Game 4 in American Airlines Center, the Lakers will look to keep hople alive their season after three straight games featuring fourth quarter meltdowns. There has been plenty of blame to go around, 

While no NBA team has ever come back from a 3-0 deficit, ESPNLA.com reports that Bryant not only still has hope, he's predicting a series victory.
"I don't know, I might be sick in the head or crazy or thrown off or something like that because I still think we're going to win this series," Bryant said after totaling 17 points and six assists in Game 3. "I might be nuts. ... Let's win on Sunday, go back home and see if they can win in L.A."
We shouldn't expect less from Bryant, one of the league's most confident and decorated players. He isn't going to fold in the face of adversity, at least not publicly. With Games 4 and 6 still to be played in Dallas, however, L.A. faces an extremely tall order. It's better to go down with your head up, I suppose.

What happens in the very likely event that the Lakers aren't able to make good on Bryant's prediction? Ken Berger of CBSSports.com explores that subject, saying that trades, possibly including some big names, are likely in L.A.'s future.

The New York Times notes that Lakers legend Magic Johnson agrees with that assessment.
“If the Lakers lose this game, you’re going to have to blow it up,” Magic Johnson, the former Lakers great, said on ESPN. “This team has been together too long. It’s time for major changes for the Lakers.”
Posted on: May 7, 2011 1:33 pm
Edited on: May 7, 2011 2:54 pm
 

Gasol says he needs to 'snap out of it'

Posted by Royce Young



It was obvious to Phil Jackson early on. I've seen Phil get animated, but during a break in the first half last night against the Mavericks, Jackson went right after Pau Gasol, even giving him a little bump in the chest with his fist. Later, Jackson zeroed in on Gasol again, giving him what some would call, a "butt-chewing."

Gasol got the message. His play didn't necessarily reflect it, but he says he got the message, according to Yahoo! Sports:

He’s “out of it” mentally and hasn’t been able to be “effective or comfortable out there,” but couldn’t explain why and says he needs to “snap out of it.” Time is running out….

“It’s been tough,” Gasol simply said. “It’s been tough more than anything [because] of the losses.”

When asked if this poor playoff season ruins his previous Laker accomplishments, Gasol sternly responded: “You tell me? Should it? I don’t know. I don’t think so.”

That's not good news for a team down 0-3. Also not good because Andrew Bynum was vocal after Game 2 about "trust issues." The Lakers are clearly having problems right now and most will point directly at Gasol. He's a player as responsible for their back-to-back titles as anyone, but within the triangle offense, it's almost as Pau goes, the Lakers go.

In this series, he's averaging just 13 points per game on 42.8 percent shooting. For the playoffs, the numbers are virtually the same. Against the Hornets, Gasol was a disappointment, but L.A. advanced because, well, they were playing Chris Paul and four dudes that stumbled in from Mardi Gras.

But against the Mavericks, it's another story. Not only is Gasol not contributing to the Laker offense, Dirk Nowitzki is torching him. According to ESPN State and Info, 27 of Dirk's 32 came with Gasol "on" him. (I put "on" in quotes because there were a few times where Gasol was decidedly not on him.) For the series, Nowitzki is shooting 19-25 from the floor for 42 points when Gasol checks him. That's ridiculous on Dirk's behalf and inexcusable on Gasol's.

Gasol's shimmering reputation as one of the most gifted big men in the league is taking a serious tarnishing right now. He's the focus of a lot of negativity. Andrew Bynum was visibly keyed in and aggressive all night. Gasol gave away an easy Jason Terry dunk at one point because he was barely holding on to the ball. Jackson claimed that was the play he first singled Gasol out on, but it's much more than that.

It speaks to the respect we all have for Jackson, Kobe Bryant and the Lakers that we haven't completely ruled them out from being the first team ever to come back from 0-3. (Or maybe that speaks to the Mavs. I don't know.) They aren't out of it until the buzzer sounds and Dallas has more points than them in a clinching fourth win. But if they have any dreams of getting there, any dreams of winning a third consecutive title, Gasol must absolutely snap out of it.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com