Tag:Tracy McGrady
Posted on: December 23, 2010 8:11 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:46 pm
 

Shootaround 12.23.10: McGrady calls out Bosh

Tracy McGrady calls out Chris Bosh, the Bobcats look to deal for a veteran point guard, Chris Webber asks questions about Brandon Roy, the Kings look to build a new home and Landry Fields continues to get a lot of love in NYC. Posted by Ben Golliver  shootaround
  • Tracy McGrady returned to Toronto Wednesday night and was booed by Raptors fans, years after he departed the city for Orlando. McGrady's response, via the Vancouver Sun. "“Keep booing me. I love it. It really doesn’t bother me at all,” said McGrady, who at one point even talked back at a heckling fan after hitting a shot. “It’s not like I was like Chris Bosh and selling out the city like the city was horrible or something, making crazy comments about the city.”
  • The Bulls destroyed the Sixers the other day, and Tom Haberstroh notes that center Joakim Noah's absence couldn't come at a better time for Chicago, given their easy schedule over the next six weeks.
  • Houston Rockets guard Kevin Martin tells NBA Fanhouse he's not too thrilled about the idea of rebuilding in Yao Ming's absence. "Rebuilding is definitely not something I want to go through again," said Martin, whose contract runs through 2013 and has a combined $24 million remaining after this season. "Daryl thinks I'm an important member of this team, especially on the offensive end, for many years to come. But this being the business, you just never know." 
  • Speaking of Fields, the Knicks defeated the Oklahoma City Thunder on Wednesday night, causing PostingandToasting.com to get pretty excited about life. "Landry Fields. Oh, Landry Landry Landry boy. How do I love thee? Let me count the ways. I love when you get a hand on a rebound, helping the Knicks regain possession without ever personally securing the ball. I love when you cut baseline for easy backdoor buckets. I love when you make slick passes in transition. I love when you nail open threes, ugly as your form may be. I love when you poach passing lanes so expertly that it looks like the pass was intended for you. I love you when you bum rush the offensive glass for tip-ins. I love when you block the shots of guys who tower over you. I love when you throw outlet passes right on the money. I love when you claw over screens to draw charges. I love when you laugh, because I laugh too. I love when we sing to each other. I love when we frolic and pick wild berries together. You complete me, Landry Fields."
Posted on: December 1, 2010 8:08 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:10 pm
 

Shootaround 12.01.10: Rudy Gay is a jumping bean

Lakers lose three straight, Blazers lose four straight, Tracy McGrady continues to be delusional, Tim Duncan notches a triple-double, LeBron James is a "lost cause" and Doug Collins has some advice for Greg OdenPosted by Ben Golliver
  • The Los Angeles Lakers lost their third straight game, this time to the Memphis Grizzlies, and forward Ron Artest his last-second missed shot at winning the game to the Los Angeles Times. "Then this jumping bean, guy by the name of Rudy Gay, comes and blocks the shot," Artest said. "I thought it was going in. I'm like, 'Why is the ball going short?' I knew the wind wasn't blowing. The ball just stopped after he blocked the shot."
  • Detroit Pistons forward Tracy McGrady, who has been vocal recently about the Miami Heat's struggles and has looked washed up for at least the last year or so, tells the Orlando Sentinel that he has plenty left in the tank.  “I’m not what I once was, but I think I’m a smart enough basketball player to be able to modify my game. It’s just working on fine-tuning what I can and what I can’t do on the basketball court. Everything is an adjustment. As long as I’m healthy, I feel good about my future.” When asked if he feels he could play “a couple more years,” he responded, “There’s no doubt.”
  • The New York Knicks topped the New Jersey Nets on Tuesday, but Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov wasn't pleased with a Knicks ad that took a shot at his franchise. “I don’t think we want to be like the Knicks. I think we’d more like to resemble the Lakers,” the New York Times quotes him as saying.
  • Tim Duncan put up a triple-double (15 points, 18 rebounds and 11 assists, which tied his career high) in San Antonio's Tuesday win over Golden State. MySanAntonio.com has his coach, Gregg Popovich, paying tribute. “He’s been the heart and soul of our program for a long time,” Popovich said of Duncan, a 12-time All-Star. “He’s where it all begins, and after all these years we probably still take it for granted.”
  • Philadelphia 76ers coach Doug Collins, a former player that dealt extensively with injuries, was asked by Philly.com about Portland Trail Blazers center Greg Oden. "The thing you worry about is what am I going to feel like the next day? It's hard to enjoy the game. When your health has been taken away from you, you lose the love of the game. Hopefully that doesn't happen to him because he's still very young and I hope he's going to be able to bounce back. It just seems like at every turn he's getting punched in the gut right now. I wouldn't wish that upon anybody."
Posted on: November 18, 2010 1:39 am
Edited on: November 18, 2010 1:40 am
 

Greg Oden now faces hard road seldom set

Other players who have faced the kind of terrible injury luck Greg Oden has. Posted by Matt Moore

Kenyon Martin.

That's the first name you need to take a good hard look at. I asked the question on Twitter because honestly, I couldn't think of anyone else. Microfracture is hard enough on one leg. But two? That's madness. That's too much. But Trey Kerby reminded me: Kenyon Martin .

Martin underwent microfracture surgery on his left knee on May 6, 2005, and then on his right knee on November 15, 2006. That's two knee microfracture surgeries within two years, which is actually worse than what Oden has gone through... but only in terms of microfracture. Oden also had surgery on his broken patella last season and his broken wrist in high school ,

Martin, though, did have microfracture on each knee and has returned to being a solid player, despite his inability to get back on the floor this season with a knee injury. The huge difference, though, is that Martin was a star player before the first surgery. Oden's never been able to get on the floor without lingering effects of an injury in some capacity.

Grant Hill will also be brought up, but his was a specific recurring injury in his ankle. Amar'e Stoudemire is the constant discussion point when it comes to microfracture, to the point where the Suns refused to give him a contract guaranteed for five years due to concerns about the knee and Stoudemire has had insurance issues because of it and his eye injury. Tracy McGrady is another injury-embattled star who underwent microfracture, but again, his pre-injury career far exceeds that of what Oden accomplished in the league througout his career, which was injury-beset in the beginning.

For Oden to get back, it will take a monumental devotion to the game and fighting through every conceivable setback he can suffer, as well as some brief, tiny moment of good luck to fall upon him to let him heal correctly. As Ken Berger writes, though, Oden's time may be  up, especially in Portland .

Posted on: September 23, 2010 4:36 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2010 4:38 pm
 

Donnie Walsh kind of regrets the McGrady trade

Posted by Royce Young

While Carmelo Anthony prefers New York to any other destination, it looks like it will be difficult to get him there, at least this season. The Knicks are lacking what the Nuggets want and as Alan Hahn of Newsday reports, the Knicks aren't pursuing Anthony with near as much aggression as they did LeBron James.

The Nuggets have said they want three things: cap relief, a young talent and picks. The Knicks are good in two of those areas - cap relief (Eddy Curry) and young talent (Toney Douglas, Wilson Chandler, Anthony Randolph and Danilo Gallinari). What they lack is draft picks, because the one they had was sent to Houston in a trade last season for Tracy McGrady.

And that's something general manager Donnie Walsh questions himself over constantly.

"I'll second-guess myself forever on that," Walsh told the New York Daily News in talking about including a 2012 first-round pick in the McGrady trade. "I've always wondered about that. I didn't like it when we did it."

I have to say, Walsh's honesty there is refreshing. Not too often do GMs admit that they may have gotten something wrong. Typically, even if a move was horrible and never came close to working out, there's some kind of justification and explanation that tries to show how it made sense at the time. But Walsh doesn't walk down that path here. He says he thinks he may have blew it.

Because at the time, it kind of did make sense. The McGrady trade helped create the cap space needed for the Knicks to sign Ray Felton and Amar'e Stoudemire this offseason. And without those moves, New York might not looks as appealing to Anthony. But that's a maybe. What we know is that Houston owns the pick the Nuggets would want.

But Walsh is trying to atone. He told the NY Daily News that he's trying to acquire a first-round pick that he could potentially use in a deal for Carmelo. But he's going to have to give something up to get it. It's just the circle of life in NBA transactions. A revolving door of moves that can be second-guessed forever.

GMs have to make choices all the time and when they don't work out, there's no one to blame but themselves. Though in a lot of cases, they try and point the finger or at least give an excuse. Walsh made a trade last year that resulted in the Knicks clearing space for a run at LeBron James. They didn't get him, but instead landed Amar'e Stoudemire. But that trade could be what costs New York Carmelo Anthony. And it's what's keeping Donnie Walsh awake at night.
Posted on: September 20, 2010 2:13 pm
Edited on: September 20, 2010 2:14 pm
 

Rodney Stuckey: "On paper, we are the best team"

Posted by Royce Young

Ah, mid-September. It's the wonderful time where not only are fanbases hopelessly optimistic, but even the players get a little sense of unbridled bias that leads to a lapse in reality.

Take Michael Beasley for example, who mentioned that the Wolves are the team to beat last week. Or Rodney Stuckey, who told Dime Magazine in an interview that "On paper, we are the best team in the league."

As Kurt Helin of Pro Basketball Talk wisely put it,
"What paper? Rolling?"

Now again, this isn't something new. Brash players tend to talk... brashly in September. And why not? You're already in first place, your front office (supposedly, theoretically) made you better and if you just play like you're supposed to, everything will be alright.

But it doesn't make it any less fun to point out these comments from players. The Pistons should be better. Last year was tough but "on paper," they improved. Who knows, in the East, anybody could realistically be a low-seed playoff team. Especially on paper.

Still, do names like Stuckey, Charlie Villanueva, Ben Gordon, Tracy McGrady and Ben Wallace really look that good on paper? As good as Chris Bosh, LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and whoever else is on that one team? Or even as good as Paul Pierce, Ray Allen, Kevin Garnett and Rajon Rondo? Or as good as Kobe Bryant, Pau Gasol, Ron Artest and Andrew Bynum? I think I've made my point here.

It's a curious thing as to why players make bold statements like these. Is it to try and fire up fanbases? Is it to try and develop and us versus the world mentality when everyone tells you you're crazy? Is it just a confidence thing? Or could they possibily, actually believe it?

Whatever the answer is on that, the lesson here is, professional athletes don't always speak with the head, but more often with the heart. And really, there's nothing wrong with that.
Posted on: August 17, 2010 5:20 pm
Edited on: August 17, 2010 10:21 pm
 

Carmelo actually plausible for Knicks?

In a time when they have few real options for upgrades, Carmelo Anthony presents a unique opportunity for the Knicks, and one they need to cash in on immediately.
Posted by Matt Moore


The best and worst thing about the New York Knicks (beyond intangible things like history and their fans) is James Dolan. For all his gaffes, his petulant silence , and most damning, for his continued association with Isiah Thomas, the harbinger of New York Basketball Doom, Dolan brings the checkbook. And that's relevant. You don't have to be a big spender in a big market. Look at Donald Sterling. Or Jerry Reinsdorf. You can pull a profit, enjoy the perks, and not push the bill. But Dolan, for better or worse, spends money to try and make the Knicks a contender.

The problem? He's been willing to make deals and put his name on the marker for decisions that it wouldn't have taken much to refute. Say, calling a few friends to ask if they were good ideas. Or opening a window. Asking a taxi driver. Using the internet . Any of these options would have given him some level of insight that hey, you know what I shouldn't do? Anything Isiah Thomas tells me.

The result is that the Knicks are a team you can 100% count on to spend money to improve their team. Dolan will dive into the luxury tax like it's a nice warm pool. He's also had to do that in order for Donnie Walsh to clean up the mess at Madison Square Garden. It hasn't just taken money, but draft picks and roster compromises, though, and that's why they're seldom considered "on the rise" despite their summer overhaul.

The worst move of Donnie Walsh's time in New York was his concession of picks in the Tracy McGrady deal. The plan was simple. Get cap space to bring in two max free agents, regardless of what it takes. But in doing so, they agreed to swap with the Rockets next season (unless the Knicks get the top overall pick, in which case Walsh has bigger issues), and surrender their 2012 first rounder. This is after having to give the Jazz their 2010 pick in the last of the Isiah Thomas collateral damage.

For a team trying to go young, rebuild, and refigure, those draft picks are gold. Or more accurately, perhaps, they're timber. Imagine you're playing one of those civilization video games. You can harvest tons of crops, and train lots of soldiers. But if you don't have timber, you're not building any structures for them to live in. That's what draft picks are. And if the Knicks were going to try and aim for a top player in the league to team with Amar'e Stoudemire, fresh of the free agency gravy train, they needed those picks. It's why a deal with New Orleans was highly unlikely for New York, regardless of Chris Paul's wedding toast.

Quite simply, the reason most NBA fans and media don't think their team will trade with the Knicks is that they simply don't have anything to give back.

Which is why the Carmelo Anthony situation presents such a unique opportunity for the New York.

With Ken Berger's multiple reports that Anthony is angling his way out of Denver and recent word that the Nuggets have started to deal with that reality , even as they try and lock in a new GM, the Knicks are most talked-about as a destination. But Nuggets fans of course don't think the Knicks can return enough assets or, as I said, picks, to make the deal. But if you're looking at the big black barrel of losing Melo in free agency, the Knicks actually have a package that could be enough for Denver, if Denver doesn't take a hard line and if New York doesn't attach itself to outdated ideas.

First, you need money to make up for Melo's contract. That means Eddy Curry. And while taking on Curry may seem a bitter pill for Nuggets fans ("Trading Carmelo Anthony for Eddy Curry?! This is madness!" No, this is the NBA post-Miami Triad), his expiring contract will put them in a position to start rebuilding, which is what happens after you lose a star of Melo's magnitude. Next, they would acquire Wilson Chandler, which again, isn't a sterling asset, but is at least a capable scorer with a reasonable contract and would fill some of the gap. The big talent target, though, would be Danillo Galinari. The Rooster gives the Nuggets a pure scorer with as sweet a stroke as you'll find the league, young, versatile, and capable of playing at Melo's position. Throw in some 2014-2020 picks, and the package isn't toxic. It's not good, but it's more than what the Cavs got from Miami absconding with LeBron James.

There are other options, like recently acquired Anthony Randolph or tantalizing combo-guard Toney Douglas. But the point is the same. The Knicks can't offer a lot of teams what they would want for a star, and can't offer what the Nuggets would want in fair return for Carmelo Anthony. But that's honestly impossible to begin with. Either you're willing to trade Melo for less than he's worth, or you're not willing to trade him. Otherwise you're just standing there, saying "Multipass!" and not understanding why the strange man keeps looking at you longingly. And with the current NBA economic situation, with the CBA future in doubt, the Knicks provide an ideal partner, surprisingly.

Any deal for Anthony will be contingent on an extend-and-trade, where Melo gets the three-year, $65 million extension the Nuggets are offering and gets the new team. The trade partner has to not only be able to swallow his current contract, but willing to take on that kind of deal with the looming possibility of a greatly reduced and possibly hardened salary cap coming about from the CBA talks next summer. To handle that contingency, you need someone with deep pockets. A little down the road, whoever does take Carmelo and his extension, even if it's the Nuggets going forward, their ownership will likely resist any adjustment that eliminates their flexibility. Count Miami and Los Angeles in on supporting that paradigm.

Dolan's checkbook can speak volumes, for better or worse. And if the new CBA restructures the NBA to a hard cap, it'll be for the worse. But just as it's been in the past, Dolan and his wallet will cross that bridge when they get there.
Posted on: August 11, 2010 9:04 am
 

Shootaround 8.11.10: LeBron is watching you

Posted by Royce Young
  • Late yesterday, LeBron tweeted: "Don't think for one min that I haven't been taking mental notes of everyone taking shots at me this summer. And I mean everyone! "
  • George Diaz of the Orlando Sentinel on LeBron's tweet : "Cancel the NBA season. Now. Be done with it, Mr. Stern. Skip all the formalities. Let’s just have the ticker-tape parade now. Break out the party favors South Florida! Crank up Will Smith’s old-school hit “Miami”, celebrating the majesty and magnificence of the Miami Heat. “Bouncin’ in the club where the heat is on. All night on the beach til the break of dawn.” Yeah baby! Jeff Van Gundy says they are going to win every single game, or something like that. The Heat will be on TV 29 times this season, coming close to the number of times you can watch Law and Order on any given day. And King James sent out this defiant shout-out on Twitter on Tuesday: “Don’t think for one min that I haven’t been taking mental notes of everyone taking shots at me this summer. And I mean everyone!” Now we’ve gone and done it! LeBron James is mad! We are doomed! What’s the point of playing?"
  • Shaq says Kobe is the best he's played with: “A lot of people rank players from different opinions, but if you wanna go with ring standpoint it has to be Kobe,” O’Neal said. “LeBron is a great athlete, D-Wade is a great athlete, but it’s close. I’m lucky to have been able to play with both of those guys, but Kobe right now has had that eye for a long time. I’ve known him for a while. When he gets that eye there aren’t really too many people that can beat him.”
  • Rich Cho has added two assistant GMs . One is Bill Branch, Oklahoma City’s director of professional player personnel and Steve Rosenberry, who served as Atlanta’s director of pro personnel/college scouting.
  • Zach Lowe of CelticsHub with a lecture on expectations: "I have no clue whether the C’s will win 49 games or 60 games or 52 games next season, but I know for sure that 51 is a perfectly reasonable guess. And if they get 16 in the playoffs? Then we’ll forget the regular-season number pretty fast."
  • Isiah Thomas is taking part in a photo protest: "Another decision by Thomas — one made in concert with his son, Joshua Thomas — has drawn considerably less attention, and it's something of a groundbreaker, too: Thomas participated in the NOH8 Campaign, a "photographic silent protest" of California's controversial gay marriage ban."
  • Vince Ellis of the Detroit Free Press writes that the Pistons have an edge with McGrady because of their trainer: "The Pistons truly believe that they have an edge with strength-and-conditioning coach Kander, who has been with the team since the spring of 1992. They think his methods are great at preventing injuries (last season notwithstanding) and helping players overcome previous injuries."
Posted on: August 10, 2010 10:37 am
Edited on: August 10, 2010 11:57 am
 

Does McGrady signing open door for Prince trade?

"" Posted by Matt Moore

Ken Berger of CBSSports.com reports that the Pistons have signed Tracy McGrady to a one-year deal worth the veteran's minimum of $1.3 million. McGrady signs after a long, arduous process of trying to find someone willing to take a chance on him despite consistent injury issues and a body that no longer hold the athleticism that made him an All-Star. In Detroit, he'll provide bench scoring, and may make a decision to trade Tayshaun Prince easier for Joe Dumars as he attempts to swing a significant deal to improve the Pistons who struggled last year not only due to injury but significant chemistry problems.

McGrady showed flashes with the Knicks last season of being able to produce points like he used to, but would then follow-up those flashes with crashes back to reality, needing to sit out halves and entire games to recuperate. He has played 65 games over the past two seasons, dealing with ailing knees, shoulders, backs, and a bruised ego. He famously told reporters he would be undergoing surgery before alerting his team, and tried to find a spot on the Heat, Bulls, and Clippers before the Pistons elected to take a chance on him.

Prince has an $11 million expiring contract and is still a productive player when healthy, the kind of asset that can yield big results in a trade to a team looking to dump salary or a major player. If the Pistons decide to go for a cap-clearing move, McGrady provides a reasonable part-time option on the wing, and if the Pistons elect to move Prince for a significant upgrade at another position, it's possible they could take on a similar low-cost, low-minute wing to provide balance to McGrady's inconsistency. Either way, McGrady should help to some small degree with putting butts in seats this season for a team whose attendance has plummetted as they have left title contention.

The significant question is not what McGrady brings to the Pistons, but if his arrival signals the departure of Prince.

 
 
 
 
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