Tag:Aaron Brooks
Posted on: December 20, 2010 8:40 am
 

Shootaround 12.20.10: Trades, injuries and LeBron

Posted by Royce Young
  • Andrew Bynum says he's still feeling pain in his knee: "It's not going to change. It's nothing to be nervous about. I have to expect that that's going to happen. I can't wait to start working with my trainer (Sean Zarzana) again, so I can get some explosion back. I feel like I can't really jump right now."
  • Rashard Lewis doesn't seem like enough back for Gilbert Arenas. But Michael Lee of the Washington Post says that should've been expected: “The Wizards weren’t going to get “equal value” — or whatever that may be — at this time. And, unless they were willing to take back Baron Davis — which they weren’t — the Wizards couldn’t find another comparable point guard in the deal. So they had to settle on adding another forward to a team that is now overwhelmed at the position, with the return of Josh Howard."
  • Jermaine O'Neal wants to retire a Pacer: "Just because I'm not there anymore doesn't mean all the memories are forgotten ... If it wasn't for the Pacers, the organization and the community nobody would have probably known who I was. Anywhere in the world I go, they know me because of my Pacers days."
  • Brian Schmitz of the Orlando Sentinel : “Blame LeBron, Magic fans, if it helps. He’s been catching Heat (and that wasn’t even a forced pun) since he left the Cavs. Folks everywhere said he was at fault for everything from the Obama tax cuts to Sal Alosi to Miley Cyrus. Those are just coincidences. Not this. Sign up for our new Varsity Sports newsletter and get high school sports updates delivered right to your inbox. He’s a serial home-wrecker, fracturing franchises like Godzilla in an old sci-fi movie. He not only laid waste to the city of Cleveland, but he’s the supernatural force that eventually doomed Orlando, leading to the Magic’s break-up. Blame LeBron. If he stays in Cleveland or goes anywhere else but Miami, F-L-A, the Magic’s pre-trade woes aren’t quite as magnified or exposed. They wouldn’t look as if they were going backward so fast."
  • LeBron gets why Orlando brought back Hedo: “I’ve thought that it was surprising when Turk (Hedo Turkoglu) wasn’t brought back  the year after they beat us [Cleveland Cavaliers]. I just thought what Turk created for their team, that point-four created everything. He always created a mismatch and that was part of the reason why they beat us. There were times I would switch off onto Turk and they would go to Rashard (Lewis). Sometimes I would go on Rashard and they would go to Turk.  We were too small on the perimeter during those years … I know they’re happy to have him back. It’s gonna be different, it’s going to be a different transition because I know when you break up a team and bring guys in it takes a while. We’ll see what happens.”
Posted on: November 8, 2010 12:53 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:34 pm
 

Aaron Brooks now out 4-6 weeks with ankle sprain

Houston Rockets point guard Aaron Brooks is now expected to miss at least a month with a sprained ankle. Posted by Ben Golliveraaron-brooks

In a quick postscript to this post from last night, Rockets.com is reporting that Houston point guard Aaron Brooks has been diagnosed with a "moderate to severe left ankle sprain" and "is expected to miss a minimum of four weeks."

The Houston Chronicle reportsthat the timeline stands at 4-6 weeks and quotes Brooks' reaction, which makes it sound like he's taking the news in stride.
"I don't think I ever had an ankle injury like this before," Brooks said. "I did break my hand in college, sat out like eight weeks. Luckily, nothing is broken. It's a sprain. I'll be back to normal. You have to count your blessings."
Brooks was injured when he landed on Manu Ginobili's right foot, but said he did not think Ginobili did anything improper in defending Brooks' running 40-footer at the first-half buzzer.
On Saturday night, prior to the full diagnosis, Rockets coach Rick Adelman had said Brooks would miss at least two weeks.
By missing Sunday's game against the Minnesota Timberwolves due to the ankle injury, Brooks snapped a consecutive games played streak that stood at 119. The last time he missed a game prior to Sunday was a Feb. 2, 2009 game against the Memphis Grizzlies.
As noted last night, in Brooks' absence, Houston would like to turn to Kyle Lowry, but back spasms kept him out of games against San Antonio and Minnesota. Look for promising rookie point guard Ishmael Smith to pick up the slack until Lowry is good to go.

On the bright side, Houston got its first win of the season against the Timberwolves, improving to 1-5. They had been the last remaining winless team in the NBA.
Posted on: November 7, 2010 6:28 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:33 pm
 

Aaron Brooks out 2 weeks with ankle sprain

Houston Rockets point guard Aaron Brooks is expected to miss at least two weeks with an ankle sprain. Posted by Ben Golliveraaron-brooks Rockets.com reports on Twitter that Houston point guard Aaron Brooks is out "at least two weeks with a sprained ankle" according to Rockets coach Rick Adelman. He will not play in Houston's game Sunday night against the Minnesota Timberwolves.  Brooks, in his fourth year out of the University of Oregon, was voted the NBA's Most Improved Player last season and is known for his immense speed off the dribble, his ability to score the basketball and his improved play-making ability.  He suffered the ankle injury in a game against the San Antonio Spurs on Saturday and the Houston Chronicle reports that he was carried to the locker room.  In Brooks' absence, Houston would like to turn to more-than-capable backup Kyle Lowry, but he has been dealing with back spasms that kept him out of the game against San Antonio. Rockets.com also reports that Lowry will not play against Minnesota, so look for promising rookie point guard Ishmael Smith to pick up the slack. The injuries add to a nightmare start for the Rockets, who had hoped to compete for a playoff spot, but are currently in last place in the Southwest Division at 0-5.  The Rockets, as of Sunday afternoon, were the only remaining winless team in the entire league.
Posted on: October 27, 2010 1:55 am
Edited on: October 27, 2010 2:38 am
 

Lakers' poise overcomes Rockets' hard work

Lakers overcome tough contest by Rockets thanks to Shannon Brown as Kobe struggles from the field.
Posted by Matt Moore

The Rockets worked hard. They hustled. They shot well. They drove, and dished. They gave up offensive boards, but they worked on defense. They forced Kobe Bryant into a hard night. They gave everything they had for three quarters.

And it only took one quarter for the Lakers to show why they're the champs. After the Rockets led by as many as 15 in the second half, the Lakers made a furious comeback behind an explosive performance from Shannon Brown, then iced it with a Steve Blake three with less than twenty seconds to go. Brown went ballistic in the third with a barrage of threes and finished with 16 points. With one last possesion and less than ten seconds, Steve Blake made a terrific defensive stop on Aaron Brooks under the basket and the Lakers walked out with a 112-110 win.

Take a look at Shannon Brown's shot chart from our CBSSports.com GameTracker :



The Rockets had solid performances from Kevin Martin in the loss, with 26 points. Aaron Brooks, outside of that last possession, was also brilliant with 24 points and 9 assists. The key for the Rockets? Turnovers. 19 turnovers to LA's 11.

Yao Ming was held to his 24-minute limit, fouling out in the 24th minute, exactly. That's one way to get the most for your minutes. Yao was great early, fighting off Pau Gasol and grabbing rebounds, but Lamar Odom decided to show for LA, and when that happens, they're impossible to stop. 14 points, 10 rebounds for the Space Cadet, and a 112-110 win for the Lakers.

Kobe Bryant was 8 of 20 from the field for 27 points, but did have 5 rebounds and 7 assists. More on #24 in tomorrow's GameChanger.


Posted on: October 22, 2010 1:48 pm
 

More on extensions for the class of 2007

Posted by Royce Young

Yeah I know. I've already gone over this. But Marc Stein of ESPN.com has some new information regarding who could be seeing a last minute contract extension before the Nov. 1 deadline.

And as was before, there may only be one player in line to join Joakim Noah and Kevin Durant with extensions and that's Al Horford. Sources maintain to Stein that a deal before the deadline remains probable, given Horford’s status as a borderline All-Star big man. Things were complicated with Joe Johnson's massive contract, but the fact Atlanta remains still on Jamal Crawford indicates they'd like to get something done with Horford.

But what about the other players? Stein says there's really nothing more than some "maybes" in that group. And that includes top pick Greg Oden. Reportedly, Oden is resigned to the fact he's not getting a deal and in fact, isn't really even asking for it. Understandable for both sides really. Oden's obviously had the health issues and both sides understand this is an important year for Oden's future not just with the Blazers, but in terms of his well-being.

How about Jeff Green, who I sort of went over already - where's he at? The Thunder have been characteristically quiet on negotiations but Stein says Green's camp and Sam Presti "aren't close" to getting anything done. However, there's been regular conversation between both sides and from I'm told, everyone is in good spirits. The Thunder are playing things carefully with Green with the new CBA coming plus Russell Westbrook's extension that's coming next summer.

Mike Conley (taken No. 4), Corey Brewer (No. 7), Rodney Stuckey (No. 15) and Aaron Brooks (No. 26) and likely looking at becoming restricted free agents as a deal probably isn't headed their way. Yi Jianlian (taken No. 6) and All Thornton (No. 14) of the Wizards have at least had negotiations but nothing appears to be coming, Stein says. However, he believes Yi may be getting an extension much like Andray Blatche's sometime soon.

Two others that are at least having discussion are Wilson Chandler (No. 23) and Jared Dudley (No. 22). Wilson's chances aren't great but Dudley, who's a quality bench player and a nice 3-point shooter, has a legitimate chance.

Overall, there's a very strong possibility only two players from 2007 will be getting extensions, with the chance of a third in Horford. And it's not like it was a bad class either. A combination of factors including injuries, team situations and the uncertainty of the new CBA have really complicated things for the class.
Posted on: October 18, 2010 5:06 pm
 

The 2007 class, the new CBA and extensions

Posted by Royce Young

There are two weeks until Nov. 1. That day doesn't mean much to most, unless it's your birthday or your anniversary (you're welcome for the reminder). But for the draft class of 2007, it's an important day. A very important day. And one that looks like it will come and go without much fanfare.

As of today, Oct. 18, only two players from the class of 2007 have received a contract extension. Kevin Durant who was given a max deal over the summer and Joakim Noah who Chicago inked to a pretty hefty contract. Other than that, no one else. The No. 1 overall pick Greg Oden? Doesn't look like he's getting paid. Other top 10 picks like Mike Conley, Jeff Green, Yi Jianlian, Brandan Wright and Corey Brewer? They probably aren't going to have anything done. Only Al Horford, who is likely to get extended by Atlanta, has a shot of doing something before Nov. 1, though David Aldridge of NBA.com says it's "50-50" at this point.

(If nothing is done by Nov. 1, then the remaining un-extended players become restricted free agents for next summer. Just in case that wasn't clear up front.)

Other than Oden who the Blazers aren't extending for obvious reasons, probably the two most interesting cases are Jeff Green of the Thunder and Aaron Brooks of the Rockets.

As for Green, Aldridge thinks that the book might not be closed on an extension for the player Thunder fans call "Uncle Jeff". In his Morning Tip column, Aldridge says, "Green could certainly argue he deserves a new deal after averaging 15.1 points and six rebounds a game last season for the emerging Thunder. And Green's agent, David Falk, has a way of persuading teams to see things his client's way, so Green's status may change by the deadline. Oklahoma City's plan has been to keep its powder dry until its young core group came on line for new deals."

The problem for Green though is his teammate. No not, that Kevin Durant guy. It's his other soon-to-be-a-star teammate, Russell Westbrook. Next summer, Westbrook is eligible for his contract extension. And much like the way the Thunder treated Durant by showing up at his door at midnight, Westbrook will likely be inked on the spot. That complicates things for Green.

Nobody really knows his true market value quite yet, just like nobody really knows exactly where he should be playing. Is he a $10 million per year player? More? Less? It's hard to say at this point. And that might be why the Thunder's likely willing to let him walk into restricted free agency. This season is big in determining that value. It's a risk for the Thunder though. There are a lot of dumb general managers out there and one is likely willing to overpay Green because he's a pretty good player playing third or maybe even fourth fiddle on a good team. Someone could very easily put $11 or $12 million a year under Green's nose.

If Green wants a lot of money, then Oklahoma City might not be able to pay him. As of now, both GM Sam Presti and Green are saying the right things. Green says he's not worried about it and that's why he has representation. He said at media day that he'll let it happen when it does. And Presti said he's had "positive discussions" with Green, but won't say anything other than that.

As for Brooks, it's already been made clear he's not likely getting extended. As the reigning Most Improved Player and a guy that's potentially a star caliber talent, he's a little miffed over it. But GM Daryl Morey doesn't want to extend Brooks for a lot of the same reasons Presti doesn't want to lock in Green. It's not to say either GM doesn't want to keep their guys, it's just that they don't want to overpay without knowing completely what they have. Plus, the looming CBA negotiations are hanging overhead and it makes it tough to just hang a big multi-year extension in front of anyone and everyone. It's fiscal responsibility, but at the same time, risky behavior because you may have to pay more to keep your man next summer. Interesting dynamic there.

With this class looking at two and probably three extensions, a small trend is developing. The 2006 class had six extensions (Andrea Bargnani, Brandon Roy, LaMarcus Aldridge, Thabo Sefolosha, Renaldo Balkman, Rajon Rondo). The 2005 group had eight (Andrew Bogut, Chris Paul, Deron Williams, Andrew Bynum, Danny Granger, Jason Maxiell, Francisco Garcia and Martell Webster). 2004 had six (Dwight Howard, Devin Harris, Al Jefferson, Kris Humphries, Jameer Nelson and Kevin Martin, but the all-time great class of 2003 had 15 (LeBron, Carmelo Anthony, Dwyane Wade, Chris Bosh, etc.). Either the talent has dropped a bit or GMs are just a little tighter with those extensions. It's probably a combination of both. And of course, that darn CBA.

(As an example though, out of that 2006 class, some players that got restricted free agent contracts but not extensions: Rudy Gay, Luis Scola, Ronnie Brewer and Tyrus Thomas. So just because someone isn't extended that doesn't mean they won't get paid big and/or stay with their current club.)

But then again, would you extend Thaddeus Young, Yi, Rodney Stuckey, Jared Dudley, Spencer Hawes, Rudy Fernandez, Al Thornton or Nick Young? (Interestingly, Ernie Grunfeld has the opportunity to do so on like half the 2007 class.) It's not exactly a group that screams multi-year, multi-million dollar contract.

Though it appears we may be in a new climate for contract extensions and it's something the 2008 class (Derrick Rose, Michael Beasley, Westbrook, O.J. Mayo, Kevin Love, etc.) will likely have an eye on. The new CBA will determine a lot of these players' future. So Nov. 1 will probably just have to come and go while they wait to see what happens next summer.
Posted on: October 13, 2010 10:22 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 7:47 pm
 

Yao Ming takes baby step back to normal in China

Houston Rockets center Yao Ming shows nicely in an NBA preseason exhibition game against the New Jersey Nets in Beijing, China.

Posted by Ben Golliver.

Pardon my pessimism, but the early reports regarding Houston’s plan to impose a strict playing time limit on center Yao Ming, who is returning from a lengthy rehabilitation after undergoing foot surgery, had me spooked. A body that big with a base that potentially fragile is a ticking time bomb, and it’s one that comes with any number of psychological hurdles to go along with the physical ones. Watching Yao play well in Houston's 91-81 exhibition win over the New Jersey Nets on Wednesday morning in Beijing, then, came as a pleasant surprise.

Yao’s first-half play was solid, noteworthy for the smoothness of his gait and his activity level on both ends. On offense, Yao extended out to the three-point line to set high screens with ease and he extended smoothly to provide help defense as well. As is often the case during preseason, the game was an up-and-down affair with plenty of quick triggers. Yao kept pace with mobile Nets center Brook Lopez, one of the league's best young big men, thanks in part to the relatively short length of his stints in both the first and second quarters.

It was during the first six minutes of the third quarter that Yao really distinguished himself. He drew two quick fouls on Houston defenders, hit a 20 foot face-up jumper, and continued to effortlessly set high screens for point guard Aaron Brooks. He was perhaps even better defensively, playing the passing lanes to grab a steal, starting transition play with two outlet passes and positioning his body effectively to defend and frustrate Lopez on the low block. Although he appeared to tire slightly and didn’t commit to rebounding on every possession, his impact was unmistakeable.

Yao’s third-quarter run ended with a thud, as he bowled over Nets guard Devin Harris, who cheekily stepped in front of his path in transition, and came crashing to the court. Man down! Cue panic response. But Yao rose quickly and with a wry smile, clearly disagreeing with the player control foul but not letting it spoil his good humor.

Taken together -- his movement, his mood -- it's fair to call Yao’s 9 points, 4 rebounds, 1 assist, and 2 steals effort in 18 minutes a baby step back to normal.

Posted on: September 29, 2010 4:25 pm
 

Brooks wants extension but Rockets won't budge

Posted by Royce Young

It's getting to the point where if you're not set up with a pretty extension before next season's new Collective Bargaining Agreement, you're required to be unhappy.

Plenty of players have already made a small stink about their situation and you can add another to it in Aaron Brooks. He told Houston media that his contract extension something that's definitely weighing on him.

"It's kind of stressful," Brooks told Jonathan Feigan of the Houston Chronicle. "I was hoping we maybe could get something done this summer, but we couldn't, so I'm stuck in the position I'm in. I understand, but it's bothering me. It's the business of basketball. You have to take it like it is. I'm stuck with that."

Asked if he felt he deserves a contract extension, Brooks said, "Oh, no doubt. I deserve at least discussions."

But there's a problem for Brooks. He's not ever going to get that extension in Houston before his deal is up. It's team policy.

The Rockets customarily don't consider negotiating contract extensions, other than for players still under their rookie contracts. They will pick up their options on the contracts of Courtney Lee, Chase Budinger and Jermaine Taylor later this month, waiting - as is their policy - for the deadline.

"We're not doing extensions," Morey told the paper. "Quite a few guys on the team are up for extensions. Just policy-wise, we're not doing it."

As for why, who knows. Team policy, you know. Morey says it's to keep the team as flexible as possible, but is it worth that to potentially upset players and cause some unrest going into the season? Players playing while thinking about money is always quite the distraction. And that could be avoided by paying them. But again, team policy.

(An interesting aside noted in the report: Did you know Kevin Durant is the only player from the 2007 draft that received an extension off his rookie contract so far? Obviously for good reason but players like Jeff Green, Brooks and Greg Oden haven't landed that second big payday yet. I found that interesting.)

The last player the Rockets extended was Tracy McGrady in 2004 and well, we know how that finished up. McGrady got hurt every 10 seconds and in the end, the most valuable thing that came from his extension was the fact he was able to be traded last season for valuable assets. So maybe the Rockets saw themselves get burned once and said never again.

Brooks is clearly worth an extension. He's a top 10 point guard in the West and won Most Improved last season. But that doesn't mean the Rockets will pay him. Morey has his ways and as one of the brightest GMs in the league, it's hard to doubt him. Doesn't mean Brooks will be playing this season with a bit of a chip on his shoulder. Maybe that's part of the motivation from the Rockets by not giving it. By not paying them now, they've got to keep earning that next contract. But I'm just guessing there.
 
 
 
 
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