Tag:Celtics
Posted on: October 28, 2010 10:15 am
 

Shootaround 10.28.10: Manic Panic

Posted by Matt Moore

  • The NBA Draft is headed to... New Jersey? The League announced Wednesday that Newark's Prudential Center, home of the Nets this season, will also host the 2011 NBA Draft while Madison Square Garden is being renovated. Considering that many of the top players are unlikely to come out due to the NBA's potential lockout next season, Newark seems like an appropriate choice. Kidding, Newark! We love you!
  • Pacers coach Jim O'Brien is not really happy with the league's suspension process for drug violations. The team was without Brandon Rush last night when the Spurs wiped them off the map likea  coke line at Courtney Love's house in the mid-90's. O'Brien doesn't like the fact that the team isn't notified when a player has his first or second positive test, only being notified when the player is benched. On the one hand, his desire to help his players deal with their problems is admirable. On the other, you have to have some level of privacy for players with these issues (while monotoring the problems). It's a complicated issue, really.
  • So... Celtics fans aren't all brushing off that loss to the Cavs last night. Yikes. Some aren't as worried . I tend to side with the latter group. It's a road game on a back to back against an emotional team with an emotional crowd and you have a team of hyper-confident veterans that would look past a game like this. Just needs salt for a perfect disaster recipe.


Posted on: October 27, 2010 11:06 pm
Edited on: October 27, 2010 11:20 pm
 

Cavs fans thank Rivers for beating Heat, LeBron


Posted by Matt Moore

Had the Boston Celtics, hated rivals of the Cleveland Cavaliers for the past three years, not eliminated the Cavaliers unceremoniously, there's a chance , again, a chance that LeBron James would not have left Cleveland. The Cavs were a fine team last year, and it's not impossible to see them getting past Orlando in the Conference Finals, nor L.A. who they swept in the regular season. It's not beyond the realm of possibility. It's just as likely that James would have left regardless, that he'd decided months ago, that it was long ago decided. It's also possible he could have won a championship with the Cavs and then walked away with a clean conscience.

But still, the Cavaliers fans don't love the Celtics, right? They don't respect and value the team that walked all over them, bullied them, right?

Well, okay, maybe a little. As Dustin Hoffman mumbled in Dick Tracy , the enemy of my enemy is my friend. From Cleveland blog Waiting For Next Year :



OK, then.

Cleveland? Can we talk? As friends do? Great. See, the thing is, Doc Rivers is a really nice man and an honorable dude. And it's almost impossible to really dislike him. But come on. I get that you're angry with LeBron, but the Celtics should still be "the other bad guys" to Cleveland. Take all the satisfaction in the world that the Celtics took LeBron and the Heat down a peg. But Doc Rivers isn't the good guy here. In your situation with LeBron? There are no good guys except you, the loyal fans.

Posted on: October 27, 2010 10:53 am
Edited on: October 27, 2010 1:16 pm
 

The Game Changer 10.27.10

Blake the hero, Ray Allen the alone, and Steve Nash is a sad panda in  the debut of the Game Changer.
Posted by Matt Moore


Each game is made up of elements which help formulate the outcome. Monday through Friday, we'll bring you the elements from the night before's games in our own specialized version of the game recaps. It's not everything that happened, but it's an insight into what lead to the results you'll see in the box scores. This the Game Changer.

THE BIG ONE: Celtics Down Heat 88-80


We've already told you about what the Heat did wrong in frames . But if we look back at the Celtics' 88-80 win over the Heat, we need to examine the real cause for the first of what will likely be many downfalls for this Heat team as they figure out how to play together: the Celtics' excellence in execution. Boston brought their A-Game last night, and their comfort with one another was evident from the get-go. That was most evident when we look back at the game flow of rotations and see that Boston ran off a 7-0 run with Nate Robinson, Marquis Daniels, Paul Pierce, Glen Davis, and Jermaine O'Neal. That's a astarter and four backups running off seven on a rotation for the Heat that featured Chris Bosh and Dwyane Wade, and for a solid minute and a half, LeBron James as well. Another thing to take note of is that Ray Allen wound up with a -2 for the night in plus/minus. Now, that's largely because he was on the floor for the Heat's big run in the second half, and the Celtics wouldn't have won without his clutch threes. but if we're looking at how Boston was succesful, it was with big lineups that bruised Miami inside and worked their way to the line.

Boston's defense was everywhere and threw in a few more wrinkles. Typically the Boston defense rotates to challenge the pick and roll high, at the elbow or mid-post. But the Celtics, knowing James is too fast to attack at that point, chose to put the stop on James right at the rim, leading to two misses and a charge. And it wasn't just James that found a hard time at the rim. Boston collapsed in on any attempt by the Heat to get point inside. And how did Miami respond? The Heat took 50 jumpers to Boston's 38. Pretty much, Boston attacked the Heat in high efficiency areas and forced them to take low-percentage shots. And the Heat just kind of... went with it. And instead of recognizing that approach wasn't working, they just shot more contested jumpers.

On offense? Boston did what it does. Rondo's distribution, being able to drive and kick, and skip-rotate to open jumpers on the far side of the floor, set the tone for the Celtics. When you've got the kinds of weapons the Celtics do, and the Heat were supposed to have, and a distributor, things get much easier. Glen Davis was huge for the C's, with 13 points and 5 rebounds on 6 of 7 shooting. The Drunken Seal was simply hitting from everywhere, including his patented falling reverse. The Heat? They had no one of that ilk, and it showed.

The Heat's defense actually wasn't terrible, until right about when their offense showed up. They started to hit shots, then started allowing Boston to trade buckets. If it wasn't for Boston's turnovers, the gap could have been much bigger. Want the biggest indication of how out of whack Boston made Miami? The team that was supposed to get out and run constantly in order to help their super-talented athletes be themselves, had fewer transition attempts than Boston, 10 for the Heat to 12 for the C's.  Boston does a great job of attacking just long enough on the rebound, even if they've already lost the board, to prevent th break. There are no outlet passes. You're just happy to have the ball.

Problem for the Heat? They didn't have anything they could do with it once they got it.

GO-GO-GADGET LINE OF THE NIGHT:

Luis Scola: 18 points, 16 rebounds, 4 assists, 1 steal, 4 turnovers, 7-18 shooting, +7 plus/minus

FRAMED FAILURE:


Hey, look Miami. It's okay. You have a lot to learn together. You need to work on so much to get in your rhythm. And Boston just hit a bunch of tough shots. I mean, what could you have done? Outside of, you know, not allowing Ray Allen to be wide freaking open :












Soundbyte Mania:

Steve Nash after the game on where the Suns are and how things are looking after their loss to the Blazers last night 106-92. Via Ben Golliver.



HERO OF THE DAY:


The Lakers needed something big. Steve Blake delivered from downtown. This is what happens when you're a member of the Lakers. Then, Blake goes to the other end and gets the key stop on Aaron Brooks, who decided to try and force something up even though he's not big enough to ride Space Mountain.




Follow F&R on Twitter at @CBSSportsNBA and check out our RSS feed . This has been your daily edition of the Game Changer.

Posted on: October 27, 2010 9:35 am
Edited on: October 27, 2010 10:57 am
 

Shootaround 10.27.10: Celebration

Boston's celebrating knocking down the ringer, the Lakers are celebrating being champs with their faces on rings, and ... Bieber.
Posted by Matt Moore


  • Well, you know, the Boston media's probably being their usual reasonable selves this morning. I mean, who would gloat aftet the first game of the season when everyone's been saying all that matters is what happens in April, May and June? I mean, come on, it's not like last night was really a statement ga....Oh.  From the Boston Globe :
"This was the most hyped and anticipated opening-night game in the league’s 65-year history. Everyone with an interest in the sport of professional basketball wanted to see the mighty Miami Heat, the team with the latest Big Three, the team that was going to re-glamorize the NBA, and never mind the fact we have a two-time defending champion located in the glamour capital of the US of A. 

But if the nation, the world, the uni verse, the galaxy, whatever, tuned in to see the mighty Miami Heat, they were re-introduced to the reality of the Boston Celtics , who have won a championship and have had two legitimate shots at others in the past three years, and who certainly look to be new and improved this season. The mighty Miami Heat could have been given a much easier opening-night foe than the Celtics’ squad that handed them an 88-80 loss to ensure they will not go 82-0."
  • The Lakers did what the Lakers do, come from behind in games where they look lackluster and walk out with a win. They were down big in the first half but stuck around because they did what championship teams do. They held on to their possessions .
  • The Lakers' championship rings have their faces on them. Literally . And part of the ball from Game 7 last year. If the Finals are Lakers-Celtics again, can we have them play with those rings up for grabs?
  • The Orlando Sentinel is laughing at the Heat... for losing to the Celtics... who knocked the Magic out of the playoffs this year. Rivalry priorities. You do not have them.
  • When you face the Suns, you have to be able to withstand runs. And that's what Portland did with their bench .

 

Posted on: October 27, 2010 12:44 am
Edited on: October 27, 2010 10:54 am
 

Video: Wade, James speak after Heat loss

Video: Wade, James speak about loss to Celtics in season opener after poor shooting performance.
Posted by Matt Moore

Well, if the first game is any indication, Phil Jackson, Michael Jordan, and those Bulls can put the champagne on ice. The Celtics dismantled the Big 3 on Tuesday night to start the much-hyped team off to a rocky start. For the Celtics, it was business as usual, holding the Heat defensively to abysmal numbers and getting easy buckets at will. A late comeback was for naught, and now the Heat get another new experience. Explaining losses for a team that's never supposed to lose due to their talent. CBSSports.com was there and in this video, we get Dwyane Wade and LeBron James' comments on the loss.




Posted on: October 26, 2010 8:49 pm
Edited on: October 26, 2010 9:04 pm
 

Celtics dominating Heat at half 47-30

Celtics dominating Heat at the half.
Posted by Matt Moore

There are ways the first half could have gone worse for the Miami Heat. A scaffold falling on LeBron James. The earth opening beneath their feet and hell swallowing them whole. A Carrot Top appearance. That's pretty much it. The quick hits.

Miami is shooting 27% from the field. They have a 63.8 efficiency mark (should be at or around 100 for average). The Miami Triad are 7 of 27 and they are down by 17 points at the half to the defending Eastern Conference champions.

Boston is constantly shutting off lanes for the Heat, and the Heat, in turn, are settling. All jumpers, all the time, that's their approach. And that's just what the Celtics want.

The Celtics are playing their game. Rondo is wheeling and dealing, Kevin Garnett got a nice move on Haslem in the post. Ray Allen's jumper is still brilliant. And the Celtics are all over the Heat. The Heat have no pick and roll action, no movement. The Celtics look sharp, look active, and look primed for the kill. Glen Davis, the Drunken Seal, is absolutely killing it off the bench with 4 points, 3 rebounds, and a block off the bench. Shaq got way too many possessions early and wasted too many of them,  but does have 6 ponits and 6 boards, and the Celtics don't need much more from him.

The Celtics don't need much at all, actually.

Follow our RunBlog of the game tonight here . Follow us on Twitter at @cbssportsnba .
Posted on: October 25, 2010 7:12 pm
Edited on: October 25, 2010 7:13 pm
 

Heat Stroke: If Heat lose to C's, drinks for free

Bar offers to pay tab if Heat lose. Put cart miles and miles before the confetti-covered horse. Posted by Matt Moore

Making your way with the Heat today takes everything you've got. Taking a break from all your worries, like Joel Anthony's shot. Wouldn't you like to get away? Sometimes you want to go...

Where the bartender pays your way... as long as the Heat win the day. You want to be where you can see Wade's hamstring looks the same. You want to go where you don't have to pay your way.


Okay, I'm done. So there's this bar in South Beach. And tomorrow, if the Heat lose to the Celtics? They'll pay your tab, up to $25 . So if the team that's been together four months, without their designated shooter, with two players having had injuries in preseason, lose to the defending Eastern Conference champions featuring four Hall of Famers and an all-world defense, you get your beers for free. Note to owners: Do not let hobos find out about this deal. It's a great promotional tactic, but if the Heat win, are they going to keep this up until the Heat lose? Have we mentioned they're in Boston tomorrow night? Because they're in Boston tomorrow night.

Well, as long as we're not getting ahead of ourselves, Miami.

Posted on: October 15, 2010 3:42 pm
Edited on: October 15, 2010 5:55 pm
 

Friday 5 With KB: Techs, STAT, and MeloDrama



CBSSports.com's Ken Berger discusses the tech debate, Amar'e Stoudemire's MSG debut, the Celtics' depth, and the continuing MeloDrama about Carmelo Anthony.

Posted by Matt Moore

Each week we'll be bringing you five questions for our own Ken Berger of CBSSports.com about the inside happenings of the league. This week, Ken talks about the Celtics' depth, this ridiculous tech debate, and drops some knowledge on the latest happenings in the Carmelo Anthony trade discussions. You can email your questions to the Friday 5 With KB at cbssportsnba@gmail.com or hit us up on Twitter at @cbssportsnba.

1. Obviously the big story this week is about the technical fouls and Kevin Garnett's ejection which you wrote about. Do you see the league trying to take this hard of a line when the season starts or will they back off to make sure we don't have Garnett tossed on opening night against Miami?

Ken Berger, CBSSports.com: Both sides are going to have to adjust and find some sort of middle ground. The NBPA put its cards on the table Thursday by threatening legal action over the league's clampdown on complaining. On one hand, this is a way for the union to force the league to make the next move and soften its stance. With the CBA showdown looming, I don't see that happening. In fact, by doing exactly what the league is trying to eliminate -- complaining -- the players may have actually caused the league office to dig in even harder on its desire to enforce the new rules. There's no comment or response from league executives yet regarding the players' lawsuit threat. I suspect the NBA will publicly ignore the players' complaint, but privately urge the officials to lighten up a bit. I think players, officials and fans will agree that blatant bullying and demonstrative complaining should result in a tech. It's unrealistic to think that spontaneous outbursts -- a fist pump, a clap, a shrug, and "and-one" gesture -- can be legislated out of the game. Another undesirable result of teeing up every player who disagrees with a call will be the shutting down of communication between players and refs. A little give-and-take is vital to keeping the game moving and letting the players feel as though they have a voice. Trying to force the players to clam up and become robots will only heighten their frustration, lead to more techs and ejections, and make for a bad, bad scene.

2. The other story this week is the continuing saga of the idiocy that is Gilbert Arenas. Flip Saunders talked about how disappointed he was in Arenas, and that seems like such a shame because Saunders has gone out of his way to try and embrace Arenas back into the fold. Is this going to to renew the Wizards' efforts to move him, no matter how difficult that may be?

KB: The problem is this: Washington's best chance to trade Arenas would be if he proved right away that he's OK mentally and physically. He's 0-for-2 so far -- faking an injury and getting fined, and then actually getting hurt in the very next game. So until Arenas can stay on the court, tone down the distractions and prove that he's still capable of playing at an All-Star level, the Wizards are stuck with him and the $80 million he's owed. He has to do that consistently; I'm told that any teams that may be interested in taking a chance need to see a body of work consisting of at least a month or two with effective play and no shenanigans before they'll be willing to consider it.

3. Amar'e certainly looked good against the Celtics, even during the brief period Garnett was on the floor. Raymond Felton seems to be struggling with him in the pick and roll, but is it possible that Stoudemire (gasp) actually doesn't need Steve Nash in order to be a top flight power forward in this league?


KB: You're right. If he stays healthy, Stoudemire will put up immense numbers in New York. Mike D'Antoni's offense has been like a giant fan with nowhere to blow the air. Stoudemire is the outlet the system has been craving. It will take time for Felton and Stoudemire to achieve anything that resembles chemistry; and it hasn't helped that Felton embraced his new team, new power forward and new system by showing up barely a week before camp, and overweight, at that.

4. Boston's depth seems like it's going to be better than it has been in years. If that's the case, they're going to rest starters even more than last year, right?


KB: That's the plan, but Doc Rivers is ready for the plan to change. The players he's most concerned with health-wise aren't Paul Pierce and Ray Allen. They're the role players, such as the role players named O'Neal. Rivers already has admitted publicly that it's unrealistic to think the Celtics can make it through the regular season without injuries. Once Kendrick Perkins comes back, Jermaine O'Neal will go to the bench, but he won't be any less susceptible to aches and pains. I think if Doc could shave a minute or three off Pierce's and Allen's averages from last season -- 34 and 35, respectively -- he'd feel good about it going into the postseason. Keeping Garnett around 29 minutes -- his average last season -- is probably about right, given that he's healthier than he was at any point in 2009-10. The big concern is with the aging bigs. Doc is going to have to be careful with anyone named O'Neal.

5. The Blazers got outed this week as one of the failed participants in the last gasps of the Carmelo four-way. Miller's got to be getting tired of being on the block, especially after only a little more than a year with Portland. Is that situation going to go anywhere any time soon?

KB: The Melo talks never stopped; they've just quieted down. New Jersey has continued to engage in discussions with Denver, though there's been little progress over the past week or so. Rarely does a low-profile front-office hire have a major impact on a franchise-shaping decision, but the Nuggets' hiring of cap whiz Pete D'Alessandro will greatly streamline the Melo negotiations once they Heat up again. One of the biggest problems for teams dealing with Denver was that new GM Masai Ujiri had never put together a trade of such magnitude. His strength is personnel; with Mark Warkentien out of the picture, the Nuggets had nobody well-versed in the complexities of structuring complicated trades. D'Alessandro's knowledge of the CBA and his relationships with other deal-makers around the league will breathe new life into the Melo talks. There may still be philosophical hangups among Denver's convoluted power structure, but at least there will be someone involved who has experience navigating the minefield of NBA trade rules. The Nuggets, Nets, Jazz and Bobcats were close enough to agreeing on a deal that a little tweaking here or there by someone with a strong background in such things would've pushed it to the finish line. It's only a matter of time before it gets to that point again. And once it does, a significant obstacle to completing the original deal won't be a factor anymore.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com