Tag:Hedo Turkoglu
Posted on: December 27, 2010 8:27 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:52 pm
 

Gilbert Arenas hits buzzer beater off shot clock

Orlando Magic guard Gilbert Arenas hit a three-quarter court buzzer beater off the rim, off the shot clock and in to beat the halftime buzzer, but it didn't count. Posted by Ben Golliver

Roughly one week after joining the Orlando Magic via trade from the Washington Wizards, guard Gilbert Arenas likely just hit the team's shot of the year. Given the fluky circumstances and the degree of difficulty, Arenas's halftime buzzer beater against the New Jersey Nets on Monday night could be the NBA's shot of the year, but unfortunately it didn't count. The Magic inbounded the ball to Arenas with roughly one second left on the clock, and Arenas, standing roughly 80 feet from the hoop, flipped a shot with both hands from his waist.  The halftime buzzer sounded as the ball was in the air, and his attempt clanked off the front rim and bounced high in the air, its momentum carrying it towards the shot clock. The ball then bounced once cleanly off the shot clock, and dropped through the basket, causing the net to swish perfectly. The crowd reacted in awe, and Arenas and his Magic team celebrated, but it was all for naught. The game officials correctly ruled that the ball was out of bounds as soon as it hit the shot clock. This nullified the three-point basket and, since the buzzer had already sounded, ended the half. Arenas and teammate Hedo Turkoglu protested the call briefly, but Magic coach Stan Van Gundy intervened, shooing his players into the visitor's locker room. Here's the video of the remarkable shot.


Arenas' heave was straight out of the famous McDonalds commercial from the 1990s starring Larry Bird and Michael Jordan.  
Posted on: December 25, 2010 3:55 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:51 pm
 

Video: Dwight Howard free throw violation

Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard was whistled for a violation during a Christmas Day game against the Boston Celtics for taking too long to shoot a free throw, and subsequently received a technical foul for arguing the call. Posted by Ben Golliver NBA referee Bob Delaney worked undercover investigating the mob, so we already knew that he was fearless. On Christmas Day, Delaney proved that fearlessness on the NBA's grandest stage, making a virtually unprecedented call on one of the league's most recognizable stars during the league's major showcase day. At the 6:48 mark of the second quarter of Saturday's game between the Orlando Magic and Boston Celtics in Orlando, Magic center, and MVP candidate, Dwight Howard stepped to the free throw line for his second attempt, with the Magic leading 30-28. Howard, a career 59.6% free throw shooter, is notorious for taking too long at the stripe, exceeding the league's 10-second limit for shooting a foul shot virtually every time he attempts a free throw. As Howard went through his routine, which includes deep exhales, shrugging his shoulders, spinning the ball, and looking at the court with his head bowed, Delaney blew his whistle, put all 10 fingers in the air to signal that Howard had exceeded the 10-second limit and was therefore guilty of a free throw violation, and began jogging down to the other end of the court.  In stunned disbelief, Howard threw the ball towards the baseline, in the direction of no one, and was whistled for a technical foul. Both Howard and Magic teammate Hedo Turkoglu attempted to plead their case to Delaney, who was having none of it. Celtics guard Ray Allen converted the technical free throw for Boston, and the Celtics received possession following Howard's free throw line violation. Here's the video. Kudos to Delaney for making the correct, albeit difficult, call, and for prompting television commentator Hubie Brown, a basketball lifer, to declare, "I have never seen it in any game I've ever done in 26 years of doing television." 
Posted on: December 23, 2010 11:16 pm
Edited on: December 23, 2010 11:17 pm
 

Magic blow out Spurs as things click in Orlando

Posted by Royce Young



If we've learned anything this NBA season it's when a collection of talented players come together, it takes some time for them to start playing well  together. We saw it as the Heat went through some growing pains. And we're seeing it again with the revamped Orlando Magic.

Orlando made some risky changes in personnel over the past week and dropped their first two after adding Gilbert Arenas, Hedo Turkoglu and Jason Richardson. Not only did they drop the first two, but they struggled scoring the ball and looked generally out of sync. This is after the Magic lost eight of nine with the only win being over the lowly Clippers. In other words, people started panicking. Or at least sweating.

But against the Spurs Thursday night, the machine actually started working together. Things started clicking. The team started gelling.

The Magic rocked the Spurs 123-101 behind 29 points from Dwight Howard, ending San Antonio's 10-game win streak. This is the Spurs team that had started the season 25-3, which equals what the 1995-96 Bulls started. So this wasn't against the Clippers against. This was against a legit title contender.

And Orlando looked darn good doing it. Howard had the 29, but six other players scored in double-figures. Arenas had 14 points, nine rebounds and six rebounds. Turkoglu 11 points and dished out six assists. Jason Richardson chipped in 15. Let me add that up real quick: That's 40 points from the new trio. That's good. The new pieces looked in rhythm and comfortable for the first time since they joined the team.

The Magic had the things working that made them such a dynamic team over the past few seasons. The drive and kick worked to perfection, Howard commanded double-teams in the post and passed out to open shooters and here's the thing - the shooters knocked down the shots. The Magic went 13-25 from 3 and shot nearly 60 percent overall.

Here's the thing though: Maybe folks shouldn't get ahead of themselves over this game. The Spurs were coming off a game the night before against the Nuggets and Gregg Popovich almost seemed content losing the game halfway through the third quarter. And when good teams are playing great like the Spurs are, it's hard to keep that level every night. So before we all start declaring the Magic fixed and ready to contend again, maybe we should step back a second.

Consider this: No Spurs starter played more than 30 minutes with Manu Ginobili and Tim Duncan only playing 20 each. The entire fourth quarter was basically a battle of the benches with the Orlando second unit playing well and holding the double-digit lead. San Antonio was fine with losing this game. The Magic though, played like they had something to prove.

There's no denying what we saw from Orlando. They had the scoring, they played tremendous defense and Howard performed perfectly inside working in tandem with Brandon Bass. The question is what happens in a tight game late in the fourth. Can Arenas take over and create shots like he did Thursday? Will Richardson and Turkoglu provide all that extra offense? Will Howard have the room to work like he did in this one? I don't think we have answers to those questions quite yet.

Still though, beating the Spurs by 22 is impressive no matter the circumstance. It's obvious that the Magic are starting to figure themselves out a bit. Amazing what a few actual practices together can do.
Posted on: December 20, 2010 8:40 am
 

Shootaround 12.20.10: Trades, injuries and LeBron

Posted by Royce Young
  • Andrew Bynum says he's still feeling pain in his knee: "It's not going to change. It's nothing to be nervous about. I have to expect that that's going to happen. I can't wait to start working with my trainer (Sean Zarzana) again, so I can get some explosion back. I feel like I can't really jump right now."
  • Rashard Lewis doesn't seem like enough back for Gilbert Arenas. But Michael Lee of the Washington Post says that should've been expected: “The Wizards weren’t going to get “equal value” — or whatever that may be — at this time. And, unless they were willing to take back Baron Davis — which they weren’t — the Wizards couldn’t find another comparable point guard in the deal. So they had to settle on adding another forward to a team that is now overwhelmed at the position, with the return of Josh Howard."
  • Jermaine O'Neal wants to retire a Pacer: "Just because I'm not there anymore doesn't mean all the memories are forgotten ... If it wasn't for the Pacers, the organization and the community nobody would have probably known who I was. Anywhere in the world I go, they know me because of my Pacers days."
  • Brian Schmitz of the Orlando Sentinel : “Blame LeBron, Magic fans, if it helps. He’s been catching Heat (and that wasn’t even a forced pun) since he left the Cavs. Folks everywhere said he was at fault for everything from the Obama tax cuts to Sal Alosi to Miley Cyrus. Those are just coincidences. Not this. Sign up for our new Varsity Sports newsletter and get high school sports updates delivered right to your inbox. He’s a serial home-wrecker, fracturing franchises like Godzilla in an old sci-fi movie. He not only laid waste to the city of Cleveland, but he’s the supernatural force that eventually doomed Orlando, leading to the Magic’s break-up. Blame LeBron. If he stays in Cleveland or goes anywhere else but Miami, F-L-A, the Magic’s pre-trade woes aren’t quite as magnified or exposed. They wouldn’t look as if they were going backward so fast."
  • LeBron gets why Orlando brought back Hedo: “I’ve thought that it was surprising when Turk (Hedo Turkoglu) wasn’t brought back  the year after they beat us [Cleveland Cavaliers]. I just thought what Turk created for their team, that point-four created everything. He always created a mismatch and that was part of the reason why they beat us. There were times I would switch off onto Turk and they would go to Rashard (Lewis). Sometimes I would go on Rashard and they would go to Turk.  We were too small on the perimeter during those years … I know they’re happy to have him back. It’s gonna be different, it’s going to be a different transition because I know when you break up a team and bring guys in it takes a while. We’ll see what happens.”
Posted on: December 18, 2010 6:04 pm
Edited on: December 19, 2010 1:05 am
 

What do the new Magic rotations look like?

A look at the Orlando Magic after their trade for Gilbert Arenas, Hedo Turkoglu and Jason Richardson. Posted by Matt Moore

Well.

That got out of hand, fast.

The Orlando Magic completely turned around their rotation today with the addition of Jason Richardson, Hedo Turkoglu and Gilbert Arenas (sorry Earl Clark). But on a team with this many options, how are these rotations going to work out? Let's take a look. First, where are they at with each position? There's no way of knowing how SVG will formulate his starting lineup, so they're considered liquid.

Point guard

Starter: Jameer Nelson
Reserves: Gilbert Arenas (combo-guard), Chris Duhon, J.J. Redick (in a pinch, combo-guard), Jason Williams

Nelson has played at a near All-Star level the past three seasons. With Carter off the grid, Nelson could benefit. Arenas can play shooting guard, but in reality, he plays with the ball in his hands. He deferred to John Wall in Washington, but it didn't work well. As a back-up point guard, he's going to dramatically improve the Magic's scoring potential in the bench unit.

Shooting guard

Starter: Jason Richardson/Gilbert Arenas/Quentin Richardson
Reserves: Jason Richardson/Gilbert Arenas/Quentin Richardson, J.J. Redick

Redick may be a trade asset now. J-Rich can play the three, but he's really a shooting guard. Arenas can play the two, but is really a point guard. Quentin Richardson is just a wing. Redick provides great insurance for the two-spot, but that's a pricy policy.

Small forward

Starter: Jason Richardson/Hedo Turkoglu/Quentin Richardson
Reserves: Jason Richardson, Quentin Richardson, Hedo Turkoglu

Hedo can play the four, but he'll likely spend some time at small forward. Quentin Richardson may actually wind up the starter here with J-Rich at the shooting guard and Brandon Bass or Turkoglu at the four. The Magic are pretty short at the three after this move, with Pietrus gone.

Power forward

Starter: Brandon Bass/Hedo Turkoglu
Reserves: Brandon Bass/Hedo Turkoglu, Ryan Anderson, Malik Allen

Anderson hasn't been as good as he needed to be this season to make a leap, while Bass has been better than expected. It's hard to see Turkoglu taking Bass' place, but given his familarity with the offense, it's conceivable. Meanwhile, Malik Allen has another duty....

Center

Starter: Dwight Howard
Reserves: Malik Allen, Daniel Orton

That's it. That's all they've got to back up Howard. Which means when Howard sits or gets in foul trouble, the Magic will have to go small. This could wind up as a good thing in the end.

Lineups

Nelson - Richardson - Richardson - Bass - Howard

If we're talking the actual best players available, this has to be it. Quentin Richardson is no star, but he doesn't have to be with the firepower the Magic now pack. It's a more traditional lineup with Bass at power forward, but with Nelson as the primary creator and Richardson geared as the finishing point, it could work.

A reserve unit could look like this:

Arenas - Redick - Turkoglu - Anderson - Bass

It's a strange big-small combo with Turkoglu at the three, but it could work with Arenas as the primary creator and shooters stocking the floor. Unfortunately, they'll get rebounded into oblivion.

Another starting unit option for SVG:

Nelson - Arenas - J. Richardson - Turkoglu - Howard

Arenas as a shooting guard is problematic, but it may be a dual combo-guard set up with Nelson and Arenas both working with the ball. I've never been sold on Turkoglu as a power forward, but he did play minutes in Orlando before. This lineup likely has the best scoring potential, and has Turkoglu as the fourth scoring option. Which is probably for the best.

The lesson here is that SVG has the same depth he had before, but now his frontcourt gets considerably smaller and more shallow. To put it simply: Howard has to stay out of foul trouble.

If Arenas can create and score to his potential and if Turkoglu regains his magic (sorry for the pun) under Van Gundy, Orlando could take a step forward -- that is, back to elite status in the East. Does that make the Magic better than Boston or Miami?

That's a whole other question.
Posted on: December 18, 2010 4:08 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:41 pm
 

Magic / Suns / Wizards trades: winners & losers

Who are the winners and losers of Saturday's trades between the Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns and Washington Wizards? Posted by Ben Golliver john-wall-steve-nash Earlier Saturday, the Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns and Washington Wizards agreed on trades that sent tons of pieces moving
That's a lot to take in. So who are the winners and losers of Saturday's trades? CBSSports.com's senior NBA writer Ken Berger and the NBA Facts & Rumors team weighs in round table style.

Winners
Ken Berger --  Hedo Turkoglu: He was lazy and inconsistent in Toronto, and didn't fit in at all in Phoenix. So what does he get to go with his $45 million? He gets traded to a contender, of course. And not just a contender, but the contender whose style and surroundings fit his game and personality. I don't know if Hedo can just flip the switch and go back to being the 2008-09 Hedo, but I know this: No knock on Jay Triano or Alvin Gentry, but Turkoglu will be held to a higher standard by Stan Van Gundy. Stan knows what an engaged, motivated Hedo can do, and he won't accept any less. And Hedo would be embarrassed if he gave any less to the organization that was gracious enough to have him back after he bolted on them for free agency, where the grass most definitely was not greener. Royce Young -- John Wall: He's been quietly waiting for the keys to the car and now he finally gets them. Ernie Grunfield and Flip Saunders tried to convince people Gilbert Arenas and Wall could co-exist in some kind of super-backcourt. And really, they probably could've, but this was more about the symbolic gesture of handing over the reins to Wall. He was never looking over his shoulder at Arenas, but now there's no question as to what's going on in Washington. It's full on rebuilding around Wall and that's got to make the top pick feel good about where he's at and where his team is headed.  Matt Moore -- Jason Richardson: Richardson shot a lot of threes in Phoenix. He'll shoot a lot of threes in ORlando. But now he'll do it on a team with the best center in basketball, and be in a position to be the guy down the stretch on an Eastern Conference Finalist team. While the Magic don't run and gun like Phoenix and Golden State have, he excelled in Larry Brown's Charlotte too. This gives him the ability to make the most of his prime and he should get plenty of looks. If he can run the pick and roll to any degree with Dwight Howard, he could be looking at the best year of his career.  Ben Golliver -- Marcin Gortat: There's nothing worse than watching a talented, agile, physical big man rotting away on the bench, and that's exactly what was happening in Orlando, as Gortat rode the pine behind MVP candidate Dwight Howard for the first four years of his NBA career. There was talk that Gortat would get pried away in free agency, but the Magic chose to retain him, and it probably felt to him like he would never get a shot. Instead, Gortat is headed to a team that desperately needs his defense and rebounding and is sure to give him plenty of playing time. He's also uniting with an elite point guard in Steve Nash, who will make his life easy on offense. Surely, Gortat's patience is about to pay off in a big way.  Losers

Ken Berger -- Alvin Gentry: The Suns' coach goes from scaring the Lakers in the Western Conference Finals to losing Amar'e Stoudemire to now losing J-Rich. But hey, he gets to coach Vince Carter. (Vince is a nice guy, but he's just playing out the string.) Who's next to go, Steve Nash? Well, yeah, he could be. If the Suns are in rebuilding/cost-cutting mode, I wouldn't rule anything out. Gentry deserves better. Matt Moore -- Ernie Grunfeld: That's it? We know Gilbert Arenas was untradeable. We forgive you for that. But to not get a pick or cash? Here's a question. Has Grunfeld won any trade in the past three years? Have they improved with any decision he's made outside of drafting John Wall, which was un-screw-up-able? Wizards fans weren't going to win in this trade, but Ted Leonsis may want to take a look if this is a business move, why they didn't really make that much money overall on it.  Ben Golliver -- Rashard Lewis: First, the prep-to-pro's talents and numbers fell off a cliff, and now he goes from Orlando, one of the league's championship contenders, to the Wizards, a Southeast Division basement dweller. Expectations for Lewis are starting off abysmally low and his fit is questionable, as Washington's frontcourt includes Andray Blatche, who plays heavy minutes, and rookie forwards Trevor Booker and Kevin Seraphin, who will need playing time going forward if they are to develop. Washington also has youngsters on the wing, so a full-time shift of Lewis to the small forward position isn't particularly ideal for rebuilding efforts either. Given the length of his contract, he is sure to be the bane of Wizards' fans existences, which is no fun, because he was able to hide out reasonably well in small-market Orlando, thanks to the team's winning and the large shadow cast by Howard. Royce Young -- Steve Nash: Nash has already expressed some level of disappointment with Jason Richardson leaving for Orlando on Twitter, saying, "Everyone wish [Richardson] the best in Orlando. Great player and great teammate! He will be missed. Damn." But now it's clear the Suns are trying to begin some sort of rebuilding project, something the 36-year-old Nash can't be excited about. The Suns almost made the NBA Finals last season behind the quality scoring of Richardson and now they get a near washed-up Vince Carter. Can't feel good for Nash right now as he sees his window closing quickly. 
Posted on: December 18, 2010 3:38 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:41 pm
 

Magic/Suns/Wizards trade: what they're saying

The Orlando Magic, Phoenix Suns and Washington Wizards engaged in a blockbuster trade on Saturday involving Vince Carter, Marcin Gortat, Mickael Pietrus, picks, cash, Hedo Turkoglu, Jason Richardson, Gilbert Arenas and Rashard Lewis. Here's what various NBA experts have to say about it. Posted by Ben Golliver

Any time a big trade goes down, the reaction comes in fast and furious on Twitter and the rest of the blogosphere. Here's what various NBA experts, players and writers are saying about Saturday's trades between the Phoenix Suns, Orlando Magic and Washington Wizards.

Ken Berger, CBSSports.com : "It is a swing-for-the-fences for Orlando, which came under immense pressure to make a big trade while losing five of its last six games and taking an obvious back seat to Boston and Miami in the East. Turkoglu, who struggled in stints with Toronto and Phoenix, returns to Orlando -- where he was a key piece in Orlando's run to the 2009 NBA Finals.  Arenas is the bigger name, but the key to the deal could be Richardson, a perimeter sniper who fits the Magic's style and gives them a clutch scorer and big-time shooter to further space the floor for Dwight Howard."

Matt Moore, CBSSports.com : "Do not underestimate the value of getting Richardson here. Forget Hedo."

Adrian Wojnarowski, Yahoo! Sports : "The Magic are desperate to please Dwight Howard and keep him out of free agency in two years. Will this be enough? Why wouldn't Orlando try out this new cast, and wait on adding Agent Zero? That Lewis-Arenas deal will always be there for them."

Jason Richardson : "It's been a great 2 1/2 yrs Suns fans! My family and I enjoyed out time around such a great organization and fans. I'm excited about opportunity to play in Orlando! Thanks for all the love and support you guys showed me. God Bless!"

Steve Nash, Phoenix Suns : "Everyone wish @Jason Richardson the best in Orlando. Great player and great teammate! He will be missed. Damn."

Jared Dudley, Phoenix Suns : "Man I'm goin to miss my boy @jrich23 .. Great teammate, good luck in Orlando boy do work."

Michael Lee, Washington Post : "This is not a basketball move, folks. This is business. The #Wizards' record past 53 games with Gilbert Arenas is 15-38."

David Aldridge, NBA.com : "The deal would rid the Wizards of one of their biggest public relations headaches in years. While Arenas helped Washington make the playoffs for the first time in a decade and became an All-Star playing alongside Caron Butler and Antawn Jamison, his infamous suspension for bringing guns into the Verizon Center locker room last December as part of a prank and/or confrontation with then-teammate Javaris Crittenton cast a shadow over the franchise. Arenas was suspended by Commissioner David Stern for the final 50 games of last season and served time in a halfway house in the D.C. suburbs after pleading guilty to one felony count of carrying a pistol without a license."

Chad Ford, ESPN.com : "I'm not a big fan of that deal for Orlando. Rarely pays to panic in December. Better deal for Phoenix in the future w/ pick & Gortat. This one feels more of a wash. Arenas if healthy helps, but Magic now pretty weak up front. After Howard & Bass, there isn't much there. Magic didn't want to re-sign Turkoglu in 09. He was overpaid by Raptors. Underperforms in Tor & Phx & now fans excited to have him back?"

Bill Simmons, ESPN.com : "1. Total panic trade by Orl but their cap was kaput anyway. As a C's fan I'm slightly more scared of them now. JR > VC + Hedo thrived there. 2. Hedo-Barbosa deal was always idiotic for Phx. Confirmed by Phx being forced to dump JRich to dump Hedo's contract 5 mths later. Savvy! 3. Phx comes within a hair of making the '10 Finals, dumps JRich-LB-Amare-Amundson...now they're way worse off + cap-wise no better. Savvy!"

Vincent Goodwill, Detroit News : "A lot of guys need the rock in Orlando. Hedo loves, Gil needs it and So does Dwight...what about Jameer too? This will be interesting. It will be interesting, whether you think it's a hot mess, I have no qualms with a team and ownership going all-in to win."

Evan Dunlap, Orlando Pinstriped Post : "Richardson, a ten-year veteran swingman, is scoring 19.3 points in 31.8 minutes per game this season and connecting on 41.9 percent of his three-point tries. He strikes me as the most significant player in this trade from Orlando's perspective, as his ability to knock down open three-pointers and elevate for jump shots off the dribble should boost its weak offense. His contract expires after this season.

The bigger draw, from a narrative perspective, is Turkoglu's return to Orlando. The Magic acquired Carter following their 2009 NBA Finals run ostensibly to upgrade Turkoglu's spot on that team, with Turkoglu departing in free agency a few weeks later. When viewed this way, the Magic had a second chance to choose between Carter and Turkoglu, and this time they sided with Turkoglu. The combo forward with point guard skills has struggled since leaving the Magic; perhaps a return to Stan Van Gundy's offense, which helped make him the league's Most Improved Player in the 2007/08 season, will fix what ails him. As my SB Nation colleague Seth Pollack writes, Turkoglu has frustrated the Suns in myriad ways this year."

Chris Vernon, Fox Sports Memphis : "Everyone has noticed how bad Rashard Lewis has been since he got caught with 'performance enhancement', right? goes on in NBA too."

Scott, Waiting For Next Year : "Orlando is the new Cleveland; adding big contracts, veteran pieces in attempt to keep Dwight Howard happy."

Seth Pollack, SB Nation Arizona : "At this point, losing Turkoglu probably wouldn't upset too many people in the locker room, as he's not been here that long. Swapping Richardson for Carter, however, could create a potential chemistry crisis that might be the final straw for Steve Nash, who's repeatedly expressed his frustration at the lack of stability on the team over the past several years."

Mike Prada, Bullets Forever : "There will be lots of time to reflect on the end of the Arenas era, and in fact, we are planning a day-long tribute to Arenas sometime early next week.  At this point, though, I'm just sad.  I wish we could have receive more than Lewis back, but we don't really know just how much discontent Arenas was showing behind the scenes.  It's possible that he was prepared to leave anyway and this was the only thing Ernie Grunfeld could get for him.  Orlando isn't going to be this desperate again this year, so maybe the trade possibility would have passed by.  Still, it's a disappointing return on the surface for someone who gave us so many memories.

Kyle Weidie, Truth About It : "Trade or whatever, Ernie Grunfeld's time in Washington has gotten rather stale. 7 years is a long, good run as a GM/team pres. #MoveOn.org"

Art Garcia, NBA.com : "Gotta admire Otis for doing something in Dec rather than Feb. Two extra months to make it work."

Ethan Skolnick, Palm Beach Post : "Offensively, on the perimeter, the Magic will be more dynamic. Lewis was in a funk, and Carter — now just an erratic jump-shooter without his old spring — was never a good fit. The Magic moved the ball better without him, as was evident when he missed the last meeting with the Heat. Arenas is a volume shooter, but at least he’s shown this season that he can still create his own shot. Richardson is a tougher player than Lewis and just as good from deep. And if anyone can salvage Turkoglu, it’s Stan Van Gundy — Hedo hasn’t been motivated or effective since he left.

Adding Arenas, Jason Richardson and Turkoglu to a shooter like J.J. Redick and a functional two-player like Quentin Richardson, plus a point guard trio of Jameer Nelson-Chris Duhon-Jason Williams, and the Magic has more depth on the outside than any team in the NBA."
Posted on: December 18, 2010 2:38 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:41 pm
 

Magic/Suns swap Carter, Gortat, Richardson, Hedo

The Orlando Magic and Phoenix Suns have reportedly agreed on a trade that includes Vince Carter, Marcin Gortat, Mickael Pietrus, Jason Richardson, Hedo Turkoglu, Earl Clark, a draft pick and cash. Posted by Ben Golliver

Earlier today, we noted a report from CBSSports.com's Ken Berger  that outlined the developing possibility of a trade between the Orlando Magic and the Phoenix Suns. Yahoo! Sports and ESPN.com are both reporting on Saturday that a deal has been consummated between the two teams.  The Orlando Magic will reportedly send guard Vince Carter, center Marcin Gortat, wing Mickael Pietrus a first round pick and $3 million (the maximum amount allowed in a trade) to the Phoenix Suns for Jason Richardson, Hedo Turkoglu and Earl Clark. For the Magic, they get a proven playoff scoring threat in Jason Richardson and a versatile forward with whom they are familiar in Turkoglu. They also get a heavy burden with Turkoglu's contract and sacrifice depth in the middle with the departure of Gortat. The Suns immediately address their needs for defense and rebounding with the acquisition of Gortat and shed the remaining years of salary owed to Turkoglu. They also roll the dice on Carter, who is in the final year of his guaranteed contract.  Berger confirms  the Suns/Magic trade reports and additionally reports that a trade between the Orlando Magic and Washington Wizards sending Wizards guard Gilbert Arenas to the Magic for forward Rashard Lewis is a "done deal."
CBSSports source confirms: Magic get Turkoglu, JRich, Earl Clark from Suns, Arenas from Wizards. "Done deal," CBSSports source says. Wizards get Rashard Lewis, while Suns get Carter, Gortat, Pietrus.
Here's a link to Berger's full trade report . The move of Lewis for Arenas is a swap of horrible contracts, but it makes some sense for Orlando as it was going to be difficult to find minutes for Lewis, Turkoglu and the team's two other power forwards, Ryan Anderson and Brandon Bass. The Magic add two scoring threats on the perimeter in Arenas and Richardson, but the trades leave them extremely vulnerable in the middle should anything happen to Dwight Howard.  For a full breakdown of the Suns/Magic trade, click here .
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com