Tag:Milwaukee Bucks
Posted on: December 8, 2011 8:01 pm
Edited on: December 9, 2011 10:54 am
 

Report: Keyon Dooling dealt to Boston

Posted by Royce Young

Keyon Dooling and a second round pick will be dealt to from the Bucks to the Celtics, according to multiple reports. Dooling will fit in using the Celtics' trade exception and then will re-sign with the club.

Any other day, this deal probably catches at least some attention, but on a day Chris Paul is dealt to the Lakers, it kind of gets glossed over. But Dooling will give the Celtics and extra shot of offense, something they're constantly in search of. Ray Allen needs solid help behind him, especially with the shortened season.

Milwaukee wants to obviously clear out a bit more room for more moves. Mike Dunleavy was signed to a two-year $7.5 million deal on Thursday.
Posted on: December 8, 2011 4:09 pm
Edited on: December 8, 2011 5:18 pm
 

Report: Dunleavy signs two-year deal with Bucks

Posted by Royce Young

The Milwaukee Bucks will sign Mike Dunleavy to a two-year, $7.5 million deal Friday, according to Yahoo! Sports. Dunleavy will take up a portion of the Bucks mid-level exception with the deal.

Here's the thing: It's easy to look at this deal and say, "What, $7.5 million for Dunleavy?" because a) that's the figure for the deal and b) because right now we're all assuming that every player is grossly being overpaid.

But the Bucks got themselves a nice outside shooter for a little more than $3 million a year. Sometimes, it comes down to what your need is and what the fit is. The Bucks need more scoring. They have needed that for a couple years now. Not that Dunleavy is a scoring machine, but he is someone that gives a bit of punch.

He averaged 11.2 points per game off the Pacer bench last season and is a guy that in 2007-08 averaged nearly 20 points a game. He's a few injuries past that time now, but the point is, he's not a bad player.

And look at what Milwaukee has at the 2 and 3 spots: Stephen Jackson is the starter at small forward with Carlos Delfino behind him and Keyon Dooling is starting at the 2. You're going to tell me they didn't need a little help?

There were better options on the market, sure. Caron Butler? Yeah, but he just signed for $8 million a year. Milwaukee wasn't going there. Richard Jefferson? He's going to want at least the full mid-level. Probably likewise for Vince Carter. So in terms of value, the Bucks tried to land a good player for a good dollar amount. And they see that as Mike Dunleavy. Not bad, not great. Kind of like the Milwaukee Bucks in general.

Posted on: December 2, 2011 9:22 am
Edited on: December 2, 2011 8:42 pm
 

Free Agency Buzz 12.2.11: Howard trade sooner?

 

Posted by EOB Staff

On a shortened schedule with the conclusion of the NBA lockout, free agency is going to be fast and furious. To keep track of all the wheelings, dealings, rumors, and reports, check Eye on Basketball daily for the Free Agency Buzz. 

Friday, Dec. 2, 2011

7:57 p.m.
7:09 p.m.
  • ESPN.com reports that at least eight teams have expressed interest in free agent forward Josh Howard: Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Denver, New Jersey, New Orleans, San Antonio and Washington.
4:51 p.m.
  • Via the Arizona Republic: "Grant Hill, after a lengthy workout at US Airways Center, said there are "good chances" of him re-signing with the Suns."
3:36 p.m.
  • Via the OC Register, Lakers general manager Mitch Kupchak expects Shannon Brown to get a better FA deal away from Lakers. Neither Theo Ratliff nor Joe Smith will return.
  • Underdog for Marc Gasol? The Indiana Pacers, at least according to ESPN.com. "One team that really hasn't been mentioned as a potential suitor for the Spaniard -- rates Marc Gasol above Nene Hilario and is strongly weighing whether to slap an offer sheet down for him."
1:41 p.m. 
  • Check out the Friday 5 with Ken Berger to get the latest from CBSSports.com's NBA Insider.
  • The Washington Times reports that NBPA vice president Roger Mason says the union will ratify the new Collective Bargaining Agreement on Thursday, one day prior to the opening of training camp and free agency.
12:15 p.m.
  • The undisputed prizes of free agency are Marc Gasol and Nene. Everyone agrees. But No. 3 might surprise you. According to ESPN.com, Arron Afflalo is the third most coveted free agent. The two teams that want him most? The Bulls and Lakers. He's a restricted free agent though and Denver loves him so it'll take a hefty offer to move him out of Denver.
8:45 a.m.
  • Grizzlies GM Chris Wallace told reporters Thursday that failing to re-sign restricted free agent Marc Gasol is "not in (his) wildest dreams." The Grizzlies are expected to match any offer for Gasol. Expect a team like the Pacers to offer up to a max offer for Gasol in an effort to pry him away. Michael Heisley's promise to spend to win is going to be tested.
Posted on: November 18, 2011 8:09 pm
Edited on: November 18, 2011 9:12 pm
 

Brandon Jennings represents Compton in new ad

Posted by Ben Golliver



Athletic apparel manufacturer Under Armour has struggle to find its footing in the basketball footwear marketplace. During the lockout, the company stooped to shock value and subliminals to pitch its wares, making an ad that took shots at sneaker rivals Dwight Howard, Kobe Bryant and LeBron James and then doubling-down by making an anti-Kobe t-shirt. 

Finally, the company has crafted a true advertising success, by putting aside the smack talk and focusing instead on the strengths of its most well-known endorser: Milwaukee Bucks point guard Brandon Jennings. With a flashy game, no-nonsense fearlessness and bubbly personality, Jennings is a marketer's dream, and the fact that he's from Compton, arguably America's most recognizable inner-city community, only adds to his aura. 

In a two-minute ad based on a new "Are you from here?" campaign, Jennings provides a spoken-word voiceover as the viewer is treated to a video tour of Compton, a California neighborhood first made nationally famous by rappers in the early-1990s and home to fellow NBAers Baron Davis, Tyson Chandler, DeMar DeRozan and Arron Afflalo.

"I'm from a place that says 1,000 things in two syllables, Jennings says slowly. "It is iconic. Known and respected. Proud. Defiant. I'm from a place that won't let you go anywhere unless you prove what you're really made of. Being from here holds a certain weight. it means something. It means no matter how thick the wall, I already have the tools needed to tear it down. No matter how hard the struggle, I've already endured worse. And no matter what the critics say, I already have the skin thick enough to shake it off."

The focus throughout is on the benefits of that upbringing: toughness, experience, wisdom, credibility. 

"Being from Compton means I will survive through the night," Jennings continues, as the visual transitions into shots of him working out in the gym and playing in pick-up games. "I'm from a place where the streets are filled with chance and choice, and you're always one wrong move from losing it all. A place that will push the limits of your soul and uncover the fight in your heart. I'm from a place where greatness is born through fearless vision and unconditional devotion. Where excellence is attained through heated competition and unrelenting sacrifice. So no matter where I go, I always stay grounded in a state of here. Are you from here?"

As is rarely the case in sneaker ads, the tagline fits perfectly with the overall pitch. The Compton portrayed in in the ad contradicts or spins negative stereotypes by painting a textured picture that appeals to the competitor in every athlete. "Are you from here?" asks the viewer to reflect on his or her own life experiences while presenting Under Armour sneakers as the go-to kicks for survivors, Warriors and thinkers. That's about as effective as sneaker commercials get.

Video via YouTube user underarmour.
Posted on: October 27, 2011 11:03 am
Edited on: October 27, 2011 11:53 am
 

Video: Under Armour 'Are you from Here?' campaign

By Matt Moore

Under Armour has launched its first real campaign with its new stable of basketball players including Kemba Walker and Derrick Williams. The concept is built around "Are you from Here?" with "Here" being that mystical place where competition is all that matters, dribbling is poetry, and the journey is more important than the destination. "Here" is also code word for "getting your face kicked in in practice so you can be the best you can be." The ad features the new stable (Williams, Walker, along with signature athlete Brandon Jennings, and without Greivis Vasquez) in a series of grueling practice sessions in various training centers. 

It's not bad, even if it's low on brand exposure for the athletes themselves. Maybe that will come with subsequent spots. It's not bone chilling, but it got a little frosty.  

Here's the ad, via Dime. 

Posted on: September 12, 2011 2:07 pm
Edited on: September 12, 2011 2:14 pm
 

Report: Jordan fined $100k for lockout comments

By Matt Moore

ESPN reports that Michael Jordan has been fined $100,000 by the NBA league office for his comments in August with an Australian newspaper. Jordan said in mid-August:
"We have stars like Bogut who are entitled to certain type of demands. But for us to be profitable in small markets, we have to be able to win ballgames and build a better basketball team."

"Bogut is a good piece to build around for Milwaukee," Jordan said.

"I love Bogut's game. He's made a very good start and he's definitely gonna be a star. His big problem is that he's been dealing with that elbow injury. But he is a star to be reckoned with (and) will be a star for some time."
via Michael Jordan airs Andrew Bogut issue | Herald Sun. 

That mention of Bogut is forbidden, as the NBA is supposed to act like the players don't exist during the lockout, for a variety of legal reasons and because, well, it sets a tone. Jordan also spoke about the lockout and what the owners were looking for as far as revenue sharing. As that kind of talk publicly can undermine the league's negotiating efforts, that's also a no-no. 

While less than the rumored $1 million fine for any league employee or representative for making contact with players or their representatives (unless you're Adam Silver, apparently), the fine is still considerable if accurate. Well, we mean in terms of most normal NBA fines or an average person's salary. For Jordan, he probably pulled it out of his wallet, or got it from under his couch cushions or something.  

Jordan was also warned not to golf with NBA players at Lake Tahoe celebrity tournament.  The NBA has levied other fines against team representatives like David Kahn for similar violations during the lockout. In short, the league's not kidding around, regardless of whether you're the greatest player of all time, a majority owner, or whoever. There are consequences to comments in this lockout.
Posted on: September 9, 2011 12:51 pm
 

Reports: Italian club pursuing Ginobili, CDR

By Matt Moore

Virtus Bologna is an Italian basketball club. Earl Boykins played there a few seasons ago. Orlando Woolridge, too. Travis Best, Charlie Bell, there's a handful of NBA guys who have donned their unis. But with the lockout and the availability of NBA talent, it would appear Bologna is opening up its pocket books for some of the bigger names. 

First, Sportando reports that a former Memphis Tiger and current Milwaukee Buck is taking off for the northern region of the boot:
Despite the meetings to avoid the lockout are going on, Chris Douglas-Roberts decided to leave NBA and land in Italy where he will play for Virtus Bologna.

The two parts reached an agreement in principle and the small forward has just to sign the one-year contract without NBA out with the Italian team.
via Virtus Bologna close to Chris Douglas-Roberts | Serie A | Italy | Sportando.

CDR has never fit in in the NBA. He landed in an unstable, volatile situation in New Jersey as management, coaching, and ownership changed hands in the handful of years he was there. He landed in Milwaukee, but since he's not a gritty veteran defender, he has a hard time getting time with Scott Skiles. Well, that and his skillset on a coordinated team level is like giving a goldfish a bicycle, even if the bicycle is really long and quite fast, the goldfish still can't do anything with it.

In Italy, he could be a star. CDR's claim to fame outside of a prolific Twitter account and his time with Memphis is his awe-inspiring one-on-one record which was at one point unblemished. Give him the ball and stand aside, Italianos! Let's hope his coach enjoys ISO sets.

The next is a report out of the San Antonio Express Newsthat involves a much bigger name. Manu Ginobili.
Manu Ginobili’s agent, Herb Rudoy, on Thursday confirmed an offer made to Ginobili to rejoin the Virtus Bologna team in the Italian League, but said no response has yet been made to the offer.

Ginobili’s brother Leandro, working as a television analyst at the FIBA Americas tournament, also confirmed the offer for Manu to play again in Italy if the NBA lockout continues.

“I don’t think Manu is thinking he will go play in Italy for two months before returning to the Spurs,” said Manu’s 41-year-old brother.
via Spurs Nation » Ginobili has offer from his former club in Italy.

You would think the only way Ginobili is going to test his legs by playing somewhere other than San Antonio is in Argentina after he retires from the NBA, a likely possibility. But the fact that Bologna is making such offers shows their commitment. It's also intriguing, as compared to hyper-controlled China and the instability of Besiktas in Turkey, Italy is a real vacation spot. Live well, eat well, enjoy the countryside, see the piazzas... that sounds like a fine way to spend a lockout. Too bad Ginobili is focused on international competition and then likely trying to stay healthy to start the season for once. 
Posted on: September 5, 2011 1:14 pm
Edited on: September 5, 2011 1:42 pm
 

Realigning the NBA

Posted by Royce Young



Conference realignment has sort of taken over the world the past few weeks. Texas A&M pretty much put the nail in the coffin for the Big 12 by bolting for the SEC and because of it, a whole new chain of events have tipped over. The landscape of college football could look a whole lot different in a few months. Or in a few weeks. Or even tomorrow.

But you know what else could use a little realigning? The NBA's divisions. They're kind of a mess. It's not going to be as a result of some $300 million network, recruiting ties or competitive advantages. Nope. For the NBA, it's more just about common sense. Geographically, the divisions are kind of a mess. In 2011 that's not as huge a deal as it was in 1981 because travel is much easier. You can go from Portland to Oklahoma City in just a few hours.

However, chartered travel is experience. Fuel is very pricey. And with the NBA and teams supposedly losing so much money, why not exhaust every option to cut costs and realign the divisions so they make a lot more sense? Why not group teams together that are hundreds, not thousands, of miles apart?

Plus, it just makes a lot more sense to have structured regions. Grouping teams together based on geography does more to forge rivalries, gives fans a chance to commute between games if the want to and gives the players less travel and more days of rest. All good, right?

So if you're going to spend all this time restructuring a new collective bargaining agreement, why not fix the divisions too? Here's how they should look:

WESTERN CONFERENCE

SOUTHWEST
Dallas
San Antonio
Houston
Phoenix
Oklahoma City

The NBA's new Southwest division is the American League East, the SEC West, of the league. It's a group of five teams that are all pretty good. Things change though and in 15 years, this could be the weakest division in the league. But for now, it'd be pretty good.

And it just makes sense. Dallas and Oklahoma City are about three hours via car away from each other. San Antonio, Dallas and Houston are in the same state. And OKC and the Texas teams and Phoenix just have one state separating them, which is a whole lot better than five.

MIDWEST
Memphis
Minnesota
Denver
Utah
Milwaukee

Clearly the division that needed the biggest overhaul is the Northwest, mainly because of the Sonics transformation into the Oklahoma City Thunder. When the team was in Seattle, the division made a lot more sense. Now it doesn't. That's why a midwestern division with makes a lot more sense.

That creates somewhat of a problem in the Northwest though. There's not a great fit. So for the sake of the argument, the Northwest has to make the Big 12 and peace out. No more Northwest, but instead the new Midwest.

The new Midwest is still a bit spread out, but all the teams are at least located somewhat centrally in the country. A trip from Utah to Milwaukee won't be quick, but the Jazz, Nuggets and Timerwolves have been oddballs in the Northwest. It's not an ideal division with teams right next door to each other, but it makes a lot more sense than the current setup.

PACIFIC
Los Angeles Lakers
Los Angeles Clippers
Sacramento
Golden State
Portland

Moving Phoenix away from the Lakers is a bummer, because those two teams are historical rivals that have always competed in the same division. But if A&M and Texas can separate, I think we can live with the Suns and Lakers moving apart.

The Pacific now features five teams that are actually next to the Pacific Ocean, which seems like it should count for something. Plus having the Blazers and Lakers together makes up for separating the Suns and Lakers.

EASTERN CONFERENCE

CENTRAL
Chicago
Detroit
Indiana
Cleveland
Toronto

Really, the new Central was the inspiration for this. Why aren't the Raptors in this division? Look at how close those teams are to each other. I think you could almost ride your bike between arenas. The old Central was really good too -- maybe better -- but the Bucks have to move. So it's the Raptors who replace them and the solid geographic setup remains.

ATLANTIC
Boston
New York
Philadelphia
Washington
New Jersey

Nothing too radical here. Five cities that you can transport between using a train. Old rivalries are preserved and the Wizards are added, which frankly, makes a lot of sense.

SOUTHEAST
Miami
Orlando
Atlanta
Charlotte
New Orleans

Two teams would swap conferences with the Bucks moving back to the West and the Hornets heading to the East. Not that this would upset the competitive balance of the league or anything, but it just makes a lot more sense for the Hornets to be placed in a division with Orlando, Charlotte, Atlanta and Miami.

And let me add this: If college football has no issue tossing tradition and historical rivalries out the window, why not just eliminate conferences all together? It would be a radical move, but what's the point of the East and West, other than just that's the structure of the playoffs? If it were one unified "super" conference, that would finally solve the issues of a 50-win Western team missing the postseason while a 37-win Eastern team slips into the eight-seed.

You could even just build the league into three 10-team divisions. Combine the Southwest and the Pacific, the Midwest and the Central, and the Atlantic and the Southeast. There are your super-divisions. Now you can keep teams playing more in their division than anything else and cut down on long road trips. It would make a West coast road trip for the Mavericks a whole heck of a lot more interesting.

Basically, we'd be looking at a league with three sub-conferences and once the playoffs started, seeding would just be based from that. Almost like the NCAA tournament, you could set two regions and seed from there. Head-to-head tiebreakers, division records and all that stuff would separate any identical records. Just an idea while we're brainstorming, you know?

(Note: I don't really love that idea, quite honestly. But I was just throwing it out there. One of those things that probably makes sense, but wouldn't ever happen. Much like Bill Simmons' terrific "Entertaining As Hell Tournament." Really, a unified conference makes it easier to implicate the tournament too.)

Let's face it: The West has kind of sort of dominated the past decade. Sports operate in cycles, but if there's a way to prevent that, should we? The West compiled a record of 2,257-1,643 against the East from 1999-2008 and over the last 13 seasons has represented 10 champions. That's pretty dominant. That'll change eventually, but what really is the point of the conferences, other than the standard, "that's just the way it's always been done" answer? 

All that is after the fact though: Divisional realignment is the start. Fixing the structure of the postseason would be the ideal next step. It's kind of like a plus-one for college football. Maybe a pipe dream, but something that's really in the best interest of the game. But if anything's to be done, it's to realign the divisions so they at least make a little more sense. Preserve rivalires, start new ones, save money, cut down on travel and hopefully, help the league grow a little bit more.

Picture via Jockpost
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com