Tag:Shannon Brown
Posted on: March 23, 2011 11:05 am
 

Barnes likely back with Lakers next year, Brown?

Shannon Brown and Matt Barnes have options to play for L.A. next season. Their decisions are at once complex and simple. 
Posted by Matt Moore

Shannon Brown and Matt Barnes will have the ability to test the market next season, under whatever weird new skies the CBA will then fly under. The Los Angeles Times reports that while Barnes' intends to stick around and exercise his option to stay with the Lakers as they make their first championship run with this core without Phil Jackson, Brown's a bit unsure. Barnes, though, made it quite clear what his top priority is:
Barnes, on the other hand, is mainly seeking stability. He is on his eighth team in an eight-year career. He has stayed with the same team for entire back-to-back seasons only once (Golden State in 2006-07 and 2007-08). "At this point, I want to win," Barnes said. "Unless it's something where people say, 'You're dumb for turning that down,' I don't really see myself making a move."
via Lakers FYI: Lakers' reserves keeping their options open - latimes.com.

Brown's in a different spot. He's having a career season, and while he turned down more money to return to L.A. this season, with Phil Jackson gone and the core getting older, Brown may want to go pursue his own career. The worry for him should be the effect that often occurs where a role player who dazzles on a loaded team with superior weaponry, then finds himself only average to below-average elsewhere. There are a lot of names for this effect, the most recent being "the Ariza corollary." 

Barnes should stay in L.A.. They need someone who brings his attitude and toughness, plus he can stretch the floor. It's a good fit and if money's not the issue, there's nowhere better to be. The Lakers will maintain the ability to bring back quality players at discounted prices even after Jackson moves on. After all, not like Kobe's going anywhere. 



 


Posted on: February 1, 2011 1:28 am
Edited on: February 1, 2011 1:29 am
 

Lakers GM open to considering a trade

With Lakers underperforming, GM Mitch Kupchak says he "may have to look into a trade."
Posted by Matt Moore

The Lakers are 1-5 against top echelon teams. Phil Jackson couldn't care less. Kobe Bryant is beyond angry. And General Manager Mitch Kupchak? He's talking T-word. Trade. From the Los Angeles Times:

"Yes . . . I may have to look into a trade, but I'm not saying we have "talked to other teams yet, Kupchak said. "We have not been playing up to our level and I dont know why. Maybe its complacency. Im not sure."
via Lakers GM Mitch Kupchak says hes thought about making a trade - latimes.com.


A trade? By the defending champs? Could this be happening? Even with the measured and cautious words being tossed around by Kupchak, that's a pretty stunning development even if the Lakers are simply considering a trade. This is a team that has looked every bit like a Finals contender, unless they've been facing an elite team this year. It's also a team that's notorious for not taking teams seriously, having gone seven games with a Yao-less Rockets squad in 2009, having a terrible second half last year, and letting the Suns push them in the Western Conference Finals using a zone, for crying out loud. You have to think this is just an emotional quote from Kupchak revealing a frustration with the team's play, or at least a Jackson-like motivational tactic.

Even stranger than the idea of the Lakers needing to make a trade is the idea of what trade they would be able to make. Every Laker of consequence with any value, contract or skill-wise, has at least two more years left on their deals. Kobe Bryant and Pau Gasol are obviously not even in this discussion. So what are the next options?
  • Lamar Odom- Trade Status: Obscenely unlikely. Odom is the quintessential heart and soul of this club. He's found a home there and has flourished when his head is plugged in. What's more, he's part of the reason for the Lakers' absurd length advantage. When Odom is on, the Lakers are nearly unstoppable. Moving him would garner the best set of assets, but who could they get for him, with nearly $9 million on the books for next season, even with his 2013 salary non-guaranteed at $8.2 million?
  • Andrew Bynum- Trade Status: Pretty unlikely. Bynum has been involved in trade rumors for years due to his inconsistency, rehab work ethic, and injuries. Yet it was his toughness fighting through the Finals last spring on a torn ligament that helped assure the Lakers a title. He's now considered an invaluable part of the offense, and his improving defense, combined with his willingness to give a hard foul, means he's the backbone of what has been a very soft Lakers interior lately. Combine that with the difficulty of getting teams to invest in someone with his injury history, and the near-$15 million on the books for next year and a team option for over $16 million the next, and it's hard to see a suitor for Bynum that would keep the Lakers in contention.
  • Ron Artest- Trade Status: Difficult: From zero to hero to zero again. Artest struggled all last year trying to learn the Triangle, was terrible at times in the playoffs, then hit the biggest hot of his career to help clinch a title for the Lakers (as well as a tip-in in the Western Conference Finals) and was everyone's hero. This year? Back to the doghouse. If anyone's to be moved, it's probably Artest, but that says more about where Ron's sunk to rather than where his value is at. Getting anything for someone who's been such a pain for so many teams with over $21 million left on his contract after this year is difficult. When it's Ron Artest? Even harder.
  • Luke Walton- Trade Status: Ha-ha-ha-ha: Yes, because I'm sure that what GMs with a valuable commodity are thinking is "Oh, we can get the 28th pick in the draft and Luke Walton with over $11 million left on his contract over the next two years? Who wouldn't do that deal?" Walton's contract is slowly reaching movable status after an ill-advised extension, but he's a long ways away from upgrade-bait. 
  • Steve Blake- Trade Status- Limited: Blake's got three years after this one for a combined roughly $14 million, is a serviceable point guard, and fits easy into a rotation. So he's got some value. But in terms of trying to get a major upgrade, he'd have to be packaged with one of the above candidates in order for it to make any sense. He can act as icing on the cake, but even then, having three years left on his deal may make it a little too sweet for most. 
  • Derek Fisher - Trade Status: Laughable: The Lakers would never give up their most veteran leader who everyone came up to and thanked after winning the last title. Bryant would never stand to lose the guy he's been to the playoffs with the most. Not everyone can run the Triangle point guard position... okay, that's a lie. Pretty much everyone can dribble the ball up, pass it to Kobe Bryant, and then go sit in a corner and often get blown by on defense. But Fisher's hit too many huge shots in Laker history to be forsaken. And no one is looking to pay him another $6.8 million for two more years. 
  • Shannon Brown- Trade Status: Intriguing, if unlikely: Brown failed to fetch any significant offers on the open market this summer, so who's going to trade for him now, even in a career year for him? He's got great upside and has looked like a possible building block, but who doesn't when they're running next to this team? Brown's cheap and his contract is flexible, but he's not going to cash in any huge superstar on the open market. 
  • Matt Barnes- Trade Status: Injured: Barnes is injured for a few more weeks, his contract's too low to matter, and the only teams that would be interested in him are contenders, the sort of teams that would never give up valuable assets to the defending champs. 

So while Kupchak may be looking to try and upgrade his team, Michael Heisley and Chris Wallace aren't walking through that door. Even with the Nuggets being dragged slowly towards the inescapable black hole in the reality that they have to trade Carmelo Anthony, and the Sixers wanting to offload Iguodala to make room for their rebuilding project, or the Suns in near full-on blow-up mode, no one's going to be looking to the Lakers to cash in.  The Lakers are on top, and have spent a lot to get to the top. They're loaded with talent, but it's not talent that garners a lot on the market. 

After all, how do you possibly get great return on trading members of the most talented team in the league? Instead, I think the Lakers will take the Phil Jackson approach. Sit back, relax, coast through the next four months, and flip the switch when it counts. They've done it before. They'll do it again. 
Posted on: January 28, 2011 2:56 pm
Edited on: January 30, 2011 3:20 am
 

Celtics at Lakers: What it means for Boston

What Sunday's Celtics-Lakers game means for the Boston Celtics in the first rematch since the 2010 Finals. 

Posted by Matt Moore



On Sunday, Boston travels to L.A. for Modern Celtics-Lakers XX.  The 20th time these two have met since the 07-08 season (twice in the regular season for three years, plus 13 playoff games) will still represent what many feel is a clash of the two best teams in basketball currently, as well as the resumption of the oldest and greatest rivalry the sport has ever known. With Los Angeles at 33-13 and the Celtics 35-10, the two look every bit ready to see each other once more in the Finals, even with challengers like San Antonio and Miami in their path. 

This rivalry extends beyond the history and legacies of their franchises, though. There's a genuine dislike between the two teams, even if they share a mutual respect.  The Celtics' brutally tough, bullying defense and marksman like precision clashes organically with the Lakers' smooth ball movement and overpowering height and athleticism run through the Triangle.  Doc Rivers' explosive motivational coaching approach runs in contrast to Phil Jackson's zen-like trust in his players and press-conference tweaking.  And at the end of it, they just don't like one another. 

But as the two meet in the rare regular season game that actually does seem to matter (although afterward the loser will predictably dismiss such claims), what does this matchup actually mean for Boston? 

Just for Kicks

Kevin Garnett has never been one to back down from an opportunity for dramatics. As much as his reputation is for visceral toughness and unbridled intensity, he is also a showman.  While the legitimacy of his stanchion-smashing, cobra-weaving, "Anything is possible" lunacy is up for debate, he does know how to send a message in outright terms. Nothing proves that like the shoes it was announced Garnett would be wearing for the game. Yes, his shoes. Have a look, courtesy of Nice Kicks /Aaron Knows and The Basketball Jones :




On the tongue there? That's the Celtics all time record against the Lakers, 152-120. The shoe is delicately titled "Beat L.A.."  Kevin Garnett had shoes produced for one game.  If that doesn't serve as proof of Garnett's intentions in this game, nothing will. It's just his feet, but in basketball terms, that's as good as wearing a T-shirt that reads "I plan on kicking your face in because that's what my team does to your team."  It's an outright signal of the Celtics' entire attitude, which isn't just "We're going to win" but "We're going to win because we're better than you, our franchise is better than you, and our collective being in every way is superior to yours."

It's why the Celtics don't really respect Orlando, nor do they show real signs of respect for anyone. It's part of their own personal code of conduct. But it's amped to another level with L.A. That will always be part of it as the players seek to carry on the legacy of the game built into the rivalry. But it's even more prevalent because of how things were the last time these two stepped on a court together. 

Revenge and the Art of Maniacal Maintenance

Losing to the Lakers in the Finals was devastating for the Celtics. Losing a championship series is hard for any player, but these are the Celtics, a group of veterans trying to make good on promises to themselves as well as their fans that they would collect multiple rings once among players of their caliber. Beyond that, though, losing to L.A. creates a sense of failure beyond just disappointment. You've let down the players that came before you, the players who managed to beat the Lakers, who protected that legacy (despite the Lakers having won quite a few of their own throughout the years).  It's the darkest of all places, as Garnett told WEEI this fall about his mindset after Game 7: 
“Very dark, to be honest, dark. ‘Just leave me alone, let me be my myself. I don’t want to deal with anything right now. Let me just be in a dark place.’ Just the way I replay the game over and over in my mind, trying to get a resolution to some type of place to where you can settle with it. I never found it, but that’s what it is. I say it’s fuel to the fire. [Expletive? (Bleeped completely out] .“
via Sports Radio Interviews » Blog Archive » Kevin Garnett Goes To A Dark Place In The Off-Season .

Paul Pierce wasn't in a great place afterward either, when WEEI spoke to him about it: 
How long does it take a competitive person like you to get over a seventh-game loss in the NBA (Finals)? A week? A month? Ever?

“I still haven’t gotten over it. It’s tough. Because you envision back, and say, ‘If we could have done this different, that different in the game, it would have been a different outcome.’ So, it’s hard. You think about the what ifs and all of that. I don’t think you ever forget it.”

What’s the process? Do you go in your bedroom for a couple of days and sleep, and then don’t shave for a while, or don’t bathe, and then finally come out of the shell?

“I didn’t talk to people for a long time. I didn’t watch any basketball for a long time. I sort of kind of did go into a shell. I didn’t want to leave the house. I didn’t even want to go out and eat for a while, because you just felt that bad about the loss. But then as I got back into the gym and working out, I just used it for motivation and just sort of loosened up from there.”
via Sports Radio Interviews » Blog Archive » Paul Pierce on Losing Game 7 .

This is just speculation, but I'm betting Glen Davis' reaction was to eat a muffin. Or a boar whole, or something. Regardless, things were pretty rough for the C's after that loss. 

Nothing will really provide the Celtics with a satisfied feeling of revenge short of winning the championship, preferably over the Lakers this spring.  But this game is a chance to send a message.  It's an opportunity to go into the Lakers' house and show them that they are still every bit as tough as they have been, and even tougher with their improved depth. It's a chance to illustrate that they are the ones in control of this rivalry, even after last spring, and that even though this is just a regular season game, they can dominate at will. 

This isn't about just showing L.A. who's boss, it's about testing themselves. Being 35-10 means little to them because they don't care about beating the Nets, or the Bobcats, or even the Magic or Heat.  They want to show they can beat the Lakers.  Everything else is just a means to get there. 

And in part, the Celtics want the opportunity to show that they're right: Kendrick Perkins was the reason they lost. 

Man Down, Ring Down

Losing Kendrick Perkins before Game 7 hurt .  One of the Celtics' biggest advantages against the Lakers as opposed to nearly every team in the league is their ability to counter the Lakers' length with their own interior defense.  Perkins isn't a behemoth like Andrew Bynum, but what he lacks in height he makes up for in toughness, physicality, and savvy.  Losing him meant the Celtics lost just enough of an edge down low.

At the end of the matchup considerations, though, is this: the Celtics were without a starter for Game 7 of the Finals.  That's enough to prompt anyone to keep an excuse at the back of their minds, even if they'll publicly give the other team credit.  Perkins means a lot to this team, and even in limited minutes now that he's back, you can see what he brings the team.  

Sunday is an opportunity to showcase what they look like at full-strength, should they stay healthy till then (which is far from guaranteed, this is the Celtics, after all).  Even with Shaquille O'Neal nursing an injury and Jermaine O'Neal still struggling through his knee problems, this is the Celtics, at their core.  Sunday provides an opportunity to show the difference in the Celtics with and without Perkins. Perkins wasn't even expected to be available for this game, supposedly out another week.

But of course Tuesday he pops up healthy.  That's how this works. Some, like myself, never questioned that Perkins would be back for this game. This game matters to him. You'll have a hard time keeping him out of a game like this, even in the regular season. Because this is like a dress rehearsal.

Trial Run

There's no way to duplicate the intensity of the Finals, but this will be as close as it will get for a while, at least until the Lakers visit Boston in a few weeks.  And it's a chance to test things for future reference. How will Shaquille O'Neal do against Andrew Bynum?  How will Nate Robinson do as backup against Shannon Brown or Steve Blake?  What can a healthy Marquis Daniels do against Ron Artest

These are the questions that will be in Doc Rivers' mind, as they try and get a regular season win, but also try and figure out some things to rely on should these two meet again.  There's no way to block it out, though they may try. "It's just another game" will likely be a refrain at practice and shootaround. Don't be fooled. This is the setup, the first act of the 2011 chapter of Lakers-Celtics.  Let's draw the curtain, and see what happens.




Posted on: December 27, 2010 1:58 pm
Edited on: December 27, 2010 1:59 pm
 

Griffin wants in; who could be dunking in L.A.?

Posted by Royce Young

Blake Griffin has pretty much taken over the NBA over the first couple months of the season. Every night people just wait for his latest highlight. So naturally it seems like he's a perfect fit for the dunk contest in Los Angeles during All-Star Weekend.

He's got the buzz around him, he's got the dunking ability and he's got the game in his team's hometown of Los Angeles.

Griffin has already said he'd be interested. "That would be cool," Griffin told NBA.com. "If it's something that the league wants me to do, I'll probably try to do it." According Chris Tomasson of FanHouse via Twitter, Griffin hasn't heard anything yet from the league. But if he's truly willing, you can pretty much guarantee he'll be there.

Another high-flyer that doesn't garner near as much attention is Indiana's Josh McRoberts. If you've been paying attention this season -- really close attention that is -- you'd have seen a few pretty terrific aerial manuevers from McRoberts. So McRoberts is firing up a little video campaign to try and get in.

Assuming Nate Robinson doesn't try and enter and ruin the dunk contest again, who else could be a candidate? Griffin is a lock, McRoberts is a long-shot unless he puts together some kind of award-winning video. Here's five others that could get consideration.

1. DeMar DeRozan:
He got in last year during the "Dunk Off" in Dallas, but didn't seem totally prepared for the contest. The guy can absolute finish with the best of them as showcased with his cram against Charlotte. Given the opportunity, I'm sure DeRozan wouldn't disappoint again. He's a power finisher with a bit of Vince Carter style mixed in.

2. Russell Westbrook:
Westbrook is a candidate a lot of people are mentioning and he's said he could possibly be interested. He was part of a fan vote his rookie season but lost out to Rudy Fernandez. Westbrook though said while he'd think about it this year, he doesn't know if he'd do it because he admitted he's not a great contest dunker. Which is true. Westbrook is one of the premier in-game dunkers out there, but I don't know how much flash he'd be able to come up with if he doesn't have Shane Battier standing there to dunk over.

3. Eric Gordon: The loser in last year's "Dunk Off" to DeRozan, Gordon is one of those inconspicuous dunkers. He doesn't look like he'd have the abilty to rise and finish, but he absolutely has some hops. He's a sentimental favorite since the contest is in Los Angeles, but Griffin's inclusion might snub him. Still, he'll at least be considered.

4. Derrick Rose: Last year, Rose was rumored to potentially be in, until bowing out of consideration. But I'm tossing him in here because he would be a really interesting competitor in it. He's a straight line player and while he looks flashy, he doesn't play with a ton of flash. But everything he does has a little extra accent on it, so even a standard two hand jam from him would look a little cooler than everyone else's.

5. Shannon Brown: Brown's performance last year was a pretty large disappointment. A viral fan movement is what got him included in the first place but once he was there it was like he didn't know what to do. He almost looked scared to really bust anything out. I think he needs another shot. Now that he's been in it and knows what to expect, I feel like he would blow us away. His leaping ability is downright scary and of course there's the natural inclination to put him in because he's a Laker and this is in, you know, Los Angeles.
Posted on: November 25, 2010 10:07 am
 

Shootaround 11.25.10: Gobble-gobble

We're thankful for you, Mo's a hero, and Mikhail Prokhorov is scarier than an overcooked turkey, all in today's Shootaround.
Posted by Matt Moore


First-off, a very Happy Thanksgiving to you and yours. We here at CBSSports.com NBA Facts and Rumors want to wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving and let you know how grateful we are for your readership. We've loved our first four months doing this, and we're excited for the next, well, forever. Thanks for your continued support. Enjoy your tryptophan-inspired comas, everyone.

The Cavs are likely thankful for Mo Williams this morning, who nailed the game winner for the Cavs over the Bucks last night. Don't believe me? Watch!




Mike D'Antoni is taking the right approach to handling the Knicks after they won their fifth straight to get back to .500: "I told them we have good news and bad news," D'Antoni said late last night after sweeping a home-and-home against Larry Brown's Bobcats. "The good news is we have a five-game winning streak. The bad news is we're .500. Let's be real."

Brandon Roy may play Friday , despite his knees being bone-dry like that turkey you're prepping.

A look at Brian Windhorst , who has covered LeBron since high school, and now covers him for ESPN in Miami, and the growing dissonance between the two now that the world is remarkably different. Regardelss of your feelings on LeBron, I ask that you be civil in the comments. Writing doesn't pay nearly as well as you think, and making that move was the logical career step for Windhorst, who is honestly one of the better scribes in the league.

The Player's Union may be targeting the elimination of the age restriction this summer. College coaches refer to this as "a return to oligarchy."

A piece on Shannon Brown and how he worked hard to get to where his contract required him to.

Obvious alert: Dwyane Wade says this is harder than he expected .

The touching story of why Kevin Durant wears No. 35.

Wait ... Mikhail Prokhorov said what?!

Indy Cornrows thinks the improved defense down low is due to Troy Murphy no longer being around. Scapegoat!

Posted on: August 5, 2010 1:48 pm
Edited on: August 5, 2010 1:52 pm
 

Shannon Brown to sign two-year deal with LA

Posted by Royce Young

According to Chris Tomasson of FanHouse , Shannon Brown will indeed be returning to the Lakers. He's set to sign a two-year, $4.6 million contract, with the second year being a player option.

As Tomasson noted,
Brown opted out of $2.149M and got $2.2M. The Lakers played hardball, which they can do because they're the Lakers. But with a player option, Brown can do this all over again next summer if he wants.

Brown is just 24 and was a productive player off the bench for the Lakers last season. In 20.7 minutes a game, he averaged 8.1 points per game and 1.3 assists. And that was in splitting some time with Jordan Farmar.

Now Farmar's gone to New Jersey, but the Lakers still brought in another point guard in Steve Blake to play behind Derek Fisher. The reasoning is likely because Brown isn't your traditional backup point guard. He likes to score and shoot and really looks to pass third or fourth behind shooting, jumping and jumping really high.

Brown was rumored to be going to both New York and Chicago at different points, but eventually stayed with the Lakers. He makes the Laker bench that much stronger and having a third point guard that can also slide over and play a little shooting guard is a valauble thing.

Posted on: August 5, 2010 7:53 am
Edited on: August 5, 2010 10:54 am
 

Shootaround 8.5.10: Candy kids

Posted by Matt Moore

The Pacers continue to search for a point guard option . There comes a point where you just have to recognize you can't go forward without a positional upgrade and you have to commit the resources necessary to acquire one. The Pacers have hit that point, but now there aren't really many options. However, if Lance Stephenson can just show a baseline of point play like he did in Summer League, he could be an option. I never would have thought that a reasonable match, but Stephenson looked like a better combo point than several attempted hybrids have.

Consider this. With Shaq signing not only with Boston, but in Boston for a two-year deal , the odds are high that his last NBA game will be as a Celtic. Try and wrap your brain around that.

Almost everyone agrees that Mark Cuban, for all his antics, is a great owner. But after Cuban lost the bid for the Texas Rangers last night, one reporter thinks his heart wasn't in it to begin with, and has some harsh words . It's hard to imagine Cuban doing the bidding of anyone, and the fact is that Cuban has been one of the best stories in sports ownership over the past decade. Committed not only to winning, but not throwing out money to ridiculous personnel like New York.

The Suns signed Matt Janning who looked good in Vegas Summer League . This brings their total number of goofy looking white point guards to three.

Lamar Odom and Khloe Kardashian want to have children . Tremble for your world, ye children of men.

Bulls blog Bulls by the Horns points out that Joakim Noah has improved his jumper . That's a fairly siginificant step for a player just to become decent and another sign that Noah is still even better than we think he is, and at this point we think he's pretty good.

In a lot of ways, Ben Wallace is the anti-Shaq. Doesn't say much. Does his job. Re-signs with the team that he's loyal to . You know, those kind of things.

Shannon Brown thinks playing time, more money, and a system that fits his skills are all fairly useless things . Why be a prince in an upcoming neighborhood with tons of potential when you can be a lapdog in Bevery Hills? Wanting to stay where you had success is nice, as is the loyalty factor, if that really is part of it. But Brown is poorly suited for the triangle and has more value elsewhere than he does in LA, walking the ball up as a third stringer and sitting in a corner waiting for a three. He's a slasher, a driver, a creator. But hey, his career. And the rings are always nice.

Bill Walton is working with Roy Hibbert, which can only lead to good things . My question? Where's Rik Smits?!

Sharks + Thunder= Thundersharks .

Posted on: July 23, 2010 5:47 pm
Edited on: July 23, 2010 5:57 pm
 

Lakers expect to sign Brown, do sign Ratliff

Posted by Royce Young

The Lakers are actively working to finish filling out their roster. As it stands, the Lakers have 11 players under contract for 2010-11 after signing Matt Barnes and Theo Ratliff late Thursday. Of course they are expected to finish deals on second-round picks Devin Ebanks and Derrick Caracter as well, meaning the roster will meet the requirement of 13.

But what about Shannon Brown? He's reportedly shopped around a bit, with his name popping up in places like Charlotte and Chicago. But it appears the Lakers will re-sign him. Kevin Ding of the Orange Country Register reports general manager Mitch Kupchak indicated Brown would be re-signed in the coming weeks.

With Jordan Farmar signing with the Nets, Brown has some pretty good value for the Lakers. He's a reliable point guard that can score and run an offense for a limited amount of time. Plus, he jumps really, really high.

Another thing Ding notes is that the Barnes signing was more for insurance on Luke Walton because Walton's back may cause him to miss all of, or at least most of next season.

 
 
 
 
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