Tag:Monta Ellis
Posted on: April 11, 2011 12:40 am
Edited on: April 11, 2011 12:48 am
 

Monta Ellis taken to hospital after hard fall

Golden State Warriors guard Monta Ellis takes a hard fall against the Sacramento Kings and was taken to a hospital afterwards. Posted by Ben Golliver.

With roughly a minute to go during the fourth quarter of a game and his team leading the Sacramento Kings, 100-97, Golden State Warriors guard Monta Ellis took a nasty spill that forced him out of the game with an apparent head injury.

Ellis drove into the paint against Kings big man DeMarcus Cousins, drawing a foul as he catapulted in the air and flung the ball at the rim. On his way down, Ellis landed hard on his right side and lay in a heap in the paint. He was able to walk off the court under his own power, but the Warriors tweeted after the game that Ellis "will be taken to a local hospital for further examination after hitting his head late in tonight's game." 

CSNBayArea.com added these details.
He landed awkwardly and appeared to hit the side of his head on the hardwood floor. Ellis remained on the ground for a minute or so and when he got up appeared visibly woozy. Ellis, who got fouled on the play, went to the bench and did not return ... Warriors coach Keith Smart said after the game that Ellis had been bothered throughout the game by a sore ankle. Ellis ended up playing just 26 minutes, but sat for most of the fourth quarter.
The Warriors also noted that Ellis "will not travel with the team to Denver for tomorrow's game." Following Monday's game against the Nuggets in Denver, the Warriors close their season at home against the Portland Trail Blazers.

Here's video of the play.



To add insult to the injury, the Warriors lost to the Kings, 104-103, giving up four straight points in Ellis' absence. Ellis is Golden State's leading scorer at 24.3 points per game, and his absence could have playoff implications, as both the Nuggets and Blazers are jockeying in the playoff seeding race. Denver is currently the No. 5 seed while Portland is currently the No. 6 seed.

Updates on Ellis' health when they become available.
Posted on: March 7, 2011 3:43 pm
Edited on: March 7, 2011 3:43 pm
 

Lacob says team considered dealing Curry or Ellis

Posted by Royce Young

This isn't exactly new news, as Warriors owner Joe Lacob had talked previously about potentially trading Stephen Curry or Monta Ellis if the right deal presented itself. But in an interview with the San Jose Mercury News, Lacob again reiterated that point.

"We did consider it," Lacob said. "And poked around. Listened to some offers and in fact in some cases made some offers. Though not final offers, but poking around. We decided that we were not going to get value in return. Those players were just too good for what we were going to get in return. We feel much more comfortable keeping them part of our core positions going forward."

Lacob also said that the Warriors could have acquired Gerald Wallace from Charlotte, but passed on it because the team didn't see it as a good fit.

"We could've gotten Wallace -- he's not somebody we thought would make us better. I really believe that," Lacob said. "He just doesn't fit for us. He's good defensive player, rebounder, certain things that do fit, certain things that don't. I could argue, don't know whether Portland got better or worse."

I like Joe Lacob. He's invested in his team, cares about results and wants to do better for a great fanbase. But is it just me or does he run his mouth a lot? I thought Curry kind of said he wasn't psyched about Lacob dropping his name out there in trade talks? And Lacob even apologized for it, saying that Curry and Ellis would be Warriors "for a very long time."

So I don't really know what to believe with Lacob. I kind of get the feeling that he just likes talking. He likes talking to people about his franchise and what they could do. It's like a fan on sports talk radio, except he's the owner of the team and actually gets to make decisions so people value his comments.

Lacob has been extremely vocal as the owner of the team, deciding to take a very front seat approach. It's different than previous owner Chris Cohan who seemed to hang in the shadows and make curious decisions without explanation.

But Lacob might want to think about some of his statements about personell, because players don't like being talked about simply as property. I thought Lacob had figured that out already.
Posted on: February 16, 2011 12:14 am
Edited on: February 16, 2011 12:16 am
 

Warriors GM: lots of trade chatter, no substance

Golden State Warriors GM Larry Riley says this year's trade chatter lacks substance. Posted by Ben Golliver. larry-riley-warriors

Earlier Tuesday, we noted statements made by Portland Trail Blazers GM Rich Cho, who said that he feels trade talks are being held up by the uncertainty surrounding Denver Nuggets All-Star forward Carmelo Anthony and that things likely wouldn't pick up until next week.

Also on Tuesday, Golden State Warriors GM Larry Riley sang the same tune, telling the Mercury News that this year's trading season has been a lot of hot air so far.
"There’s a lot of chatter, but not a lot of substance to the chatter ... And it seems that a lot of teams actually positioned themselves last summer to get ready for what’s going on right now. So then there’s some reluctance to move away from the plans they put into place at that time. ... Now, things will Heat up. As people get closer to the deadline, deadlines tend to draw people out."
Also of note, Riley said that interest in expiring contracts this year appears to have wained.
"If you look at what has been done—Toronto acquires Peja Stojakovic and then apparently saw no value in having him as an expiring contract. And that philosophy looks to be in place with a lot of teams."
Aside from some foolish, back-tracked hypoethetical chatter regarding Stephen Curry and Monta Ellis from their new owner, the Warriors haven't found themselves in many trade rumors this year. 

With a 24-29 record as of Tuesday night, Golden State's chance of making a playoff push in the jam-packed Western Conference are remote. Taking on additional salary heading into a potential lockout would seem to be a risky proposition for any team, and the Warriors have already locked themselves into long-term deals for Ellis, David Lee and Andris Biederins, so any flexibility they can create will be at a premium. 

Given that the Warriors are currently over the cap and have two sizeable contracts coming off their books this summer -Vladimir Radmanovic and Dan Gadzuric - they might be best served to simply wait things out prior to the deadline, opting to enjoy that salary cap relief themselves and test their luck in the NBA Draft Lottery.
Posted on: January 24, 2011 4:46 pm
Edited on: January 24, 2011 4:53 pm
 

Warriors G Stephen Curry shocked by trade talk

Golden State Warriors point guard Stephen Curry responds to owner Joe Lacob saying that he could be traded. Posted by Ben Golliver. stephen-curry

Joe Lacob is the newly-minted owner of the Golden State Warriors, so we should probably forgive him for being a bit too honest in his recent talk of shaking up his roster. In comments made to MercuryNews.com last week, Lacob said that no one on his team is untouchable and that he would consider breaking up the Stephen Curry / Monta Ellis backcourt if presented with a good trade offer.
"I really like those guys as individuals, and I like them as players," Lacob said. "But I have to be honest, it depends. If we got offered a great situation, would I break it up? Yes."
The owner called Ellis "our core, franchise player," and agreed that Curry has not played to the standards of last season.
"Does that mean that Curry would be traded, or more likely to be traded than Ellis? Not necessarily," Lacob said. "It really depends. "... This is all dependent on what you're going to get in return."
Well, that is certainly an unusual way to conduct business in the NBA. 

Curry has been hampered by ankle injuries throughout the season and, it cannot be forgotten, is still really freaking good. He's on a rookie deal, his scoring numbers are up, he's improved his assist/turnover ratio, he's one of the best shooters in the league, he brings no ego or baggage to the table, he wants to win and plays hard every night, he puts in the hours to make himself better and he's helped Ellis take a step forward in his career development this season. He has shortcomings defensively, but so does the rest of the team, as Golden State is ranked No. 26 in defensive efficiency

This is a guy that you want to keep happy and that you want to keep long-term. He's a franchise piece and executives from all the teams out there without a quality starting point guard are likely reading Lacob's statements and wondering whether he's lost his marbles or is in over his head.

To his credit, Curry responded in the best way possible: producing on the court and remaining as professional as possible. Here are his thoughts, via the Oakland Tribune.
"It's a bit of a shock, because you feel like you're doing everything else you were supposed to be doing," Curry said Sunday. "Especially since I've never been in a situation where me changing teams or being traded would be an option, it's kind of like a weird thing to think about. But they've been straightforward about what they see in us and it's all been positive for me, so I don't have any problem brushing that off."
If you call 66 points, 11 assists and nine rebounds over two games brushing it off, then Curry indeed dusted the rumors off his shoulder. He led a fourth-quarter comeback in Friday's win over Sacramento. He almost did again Saturday against the Clippers in Los Angeles with backcourt mate Monta Ellis limited by a sore ankle.

"If anything," Curry said, "it was the result of me reminding myself. I'm my biggest critic. I just play the game and don't worry about expectations except the ones I put on myself."
Calling out players in public is almost always a recipe for disaster, even when we're talking about a choirboy like Curry. Surely when Lacob has some time to reflect on his statements and the impact they would have on a young guy like Curry, he might realize that he could have found a better approach publicly. 

NBA stars have memories like elephants, and team and player have many negotiating sessions ahead of them. Goodwill in public is a highly underrated commodity in this league. 
Posted on: January 21, 2011 2:21 pm
 

Now the Warriors are going for Carmelo?

Posted by Royce Young

As soon as Mikhail Prokhorov let the words out of his mouth, Masai Ujiri's phone probably started ringing. And ringing. And ringing.

Once it became clear that the New Jersey Nets were pulling out of the Carmelo Anthony chase, the world opened up to 29 other teams that might be in search of a new piece to the puzzle. Not necessarily in terms of just Anthony, but maybe they could become a partner in a potential three-way deal.

But some out there are definitely interested in the services of Melo. He's a star with star power and scoring power. No matter what the statistical inclined people say, Melo is a very, very good basketball player. And people want it.

So on top of the Knicks, Rockets and Mavericks, add in a new team that might be interested in playing the Melo game. The Golden State Warriors.

"We've had discussions with Denver," owner Joe Lacob to the Mercury News. "And I think it's possible. But unfortunately, he clearly wants to be one place geographically."

Ah, so Lacob isn't actually completely serious about it, because unlike some, he realizes that the whole extension thing is the catch in this whole thing. But Lacob said he thinks the Warriors can offer a package that would top any other out there. He said the team wouldn't be shy about breaking up Monta Ellis and Stephen Curry if the right deal presented itself.

"We think we have better assets to go after someone like him, that caliber, than most of the teams out there that are being talked about," Lacob said.

The Warriors new ownership group clearly has visions of running this franchise in a different way than Chris Cohan. Lacob isn't shy about saying what he wants. He talked about the team needing post help, about not understanding some of Keith Smart's rotations and how they feel the need to be aggressive and active in trade discussions.

"We're willing to do anything to improve this team -- I told you," Lacob said.

We hear you, Joe. But talking is one thing. Warriors fans have heard a lot of that. Melo obviously isn't in the cards for Golden State but it sounds like the team is willing to take a chance to make a splash. That's progress, I think.

Posted on: January 20, 2011 1:38 pm
Edited on: January 20, 2011 1:44 pm
 

Game Changer: Clippers keep rolling

The Los Angeles Clippers keep rolling, Blake Griffin goes 360 pivot before dunking, Monta Ellis hits a game-winner and more. Posted by Ben Golliver.

Each game is made up of elements which help formulate the outcome. Monday through Friday, we'll bring you the elements from the night before's games in our own specialized version of the game recaps. It's not everything that happened, but it's an insight into what lead to the results you'll see in the box scores. This is the Game Changer. 

THE BIG ONE: CLIPPERS KEEP ROLLING

There's no better story in the NBA over the last two weeks than the resurgent Los Angeles Clippers, who pulled themselves together after a dreadful start to the season. Rather than treat 2011 as a walk of shame, the Clippers are cat-walking through the competition, notching their third straight victory and sixth in the last seven games by smashing the Minnesota Timberwolves, 126-111. 

Every night is the Blake Griffin show, and Griffin delivered yet again (see highlights below). But Wednesday night also revealed some excellent scoring balance and all-around unselfish, excited play. The Timberwolves are simply awful on defense and the Clippers exploited those holes nicely, getting lots of easy looks by registering 26 assists on 44 field goal makes, shooting nearly 50% as a team on the night.

Eric Gordon, battling through a finger injury, put up 23 points on just 14 shots and he didn't miss from downtown. With the Clippers' recent success, are we finally turning a corner as a nation and realizing what Gordon's been doing over the last few months? This nice SB Nation analysis suggests that maybe we are.

Aside from LA's headliners, there's progress to be seen up and down the roster. If you rewound back to the early struggles and made a checklist of the improvements you would want to see, that list would look something like...
  • DeAndre Jordan must play engaged, excited ball and trust his physical skills.
  • Baron Davis must try. Really try.
  • Eric Bledsoe needs to be an impact player in his minutes.
  • Griffin must get to the free throw line all night long.
All of those things happened last night, and it was smooth sailing against an inferior opponent. A major step for any lottery team comes when they are able to put away other lottery teams forcefully. Do that enough and you're in the playoff picture. If things keep clicking along like this, it's not impossible to imagine that Los Angeles could find themselves in a tussle for the Western Conference's 8th seed by season's end.

As for now, the second half of a home-and-away back-to-back greets them on Thursday night, in Portland against the Trail Blazers.

GO-GO-GADGET LINES OF THE NIGHT:


Danny Granger: 32 points, 13 rebounds, six assists, three steals, one block on 11-19 shooting in 42 minutes in an Indiana Pacers road loss to the Golden State Warriors.

DeJuan Blair: 22 points, 11 rebounds, one assist, one steal, one block on 11-16 shooting in 35 minutes in a San Antonio Spurs home victory over the Toronto Raptors.

Carmelo Anthony: 35 points, seven rebounds, one assist in 38 minutes in a Denver Nuggets home victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder.
Monta Ellis: 36 points, five rebounds, six assists in 44 minutes in a Golden State Warriors home victory over the Indiana Pacers.

DON'T MISS:

WHIMSY:

Like Dwight Howard and Shaquille O'Neal wrestling, except the exact opposite. Indiana Pacers forward Tyler Hansbrough and Golden State Warriors point guard Stephen Curry compete in a funny faces contest. Winner gets possession.   hansbrough-curry

HIGHLIGHT REEL PART ONE:

Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin did it again for the 4,000,000th time this season in a game against the Minnesota Timberwolves last night, taking the basketball coast-to-coast, pivoting 360 degrees to avoid Corey Brewer, taking two power gather dribbles and rising up to throw down the monster slam. Did I mention he's a power forward?



HIGHLIGHT REEL PART TWO:

This dunk is so nice you have to watch it twice. Here's Griffin in the super slow motion.


HERO OF THE NIGHT:

Golden State Warriors guard Monta Ellis delivers the last-second game-winner at home, pushing the Warriors past the Indiana Pacers 110-108, much to the delight of the Oracle Arena crowd. Courtesy of YouTube user thehoopscene.


Posted on: January 20, 2011 1:38 pm
Edited on: January 20, 2011 1:44 pm
 

Game Changer: Clippers keep rolling

The Los Angeles Clippers keep rolling, Blake Griffin goes 360 pivot before dunking, Monta Ellis hits a game-winner and more. Posted by Ben Golliver.

Each game is made up of elements which help formulate the outcome. Monday through Friday, we'll bring you the elements from the night before's games in our own specialized version of the game recaps. It's not everything that happened, but it's an insight into what lead to the results you'll see in the box scores. This is the Game Changer. 

THE BIG ONE: CLIPPERS KEEP ROLLING

There's no better story in the NBA over the last two weeks than the resurgent Los Angeles Clippers, who pulled themselves together after a dreadful start to the season. Rather than treat 2011 as a walk of shame, the Clippers are cat-walking through the competition, notching their third straight victory and sixth in the last seven games by smashing the Minnesota Timberwolves, 126-111. 

Every night is the Blake Griffin show, and Griffin delivered yet again (see highlights below). But Wednesday night also revealed some excellent scoring balance and all-around unselfish, excited play. The Timberwolves are simply awful on defense and the Clippers exploited those holes nicely, getting lots of easy looks by registering 26 assists on 44 field goal makes, shooting nearly 50% as a team on the night.

Eric Gordon, battling through a finger injury, put up 23 points on just 14 shots and he didn't miss from downtown. With the Clippers' recent success, are we finally turning a corner as a nation and realizing what Gordon's been doing over the last few months? This nice SB Nation analysis suggests that maybe we are.

Aside from LA's headliners, there's progress to be seen up and down the roster. If you rewound back to the early struggles and made a checklist of the improvements you would want to see, that list would look something like...
  • DeAndre Jordan must play engaged, excited ball and trust his physical skills.
  • Baron Davis must try. Really try.
  • Eric Bledsoe needs to be an impact player in his minutes.
  • Griffin must get to the free throw line all night long.
All of those things happened last night, and it was smooth sailing against an inferior opponent. A major step for any lottery team comes when they are able to put away other lottery teams forcefully. Do that enough and you're in the playoff picture. If things keep clicking along like this, it's not impossible to imagine that Los Angeles could find themselves in a tussle for the Western Conference's 8th seed by season's end.

As for now, the second half of a home-and-away back-to-back greets them on Thursday night, in Portland against the Trail Blazers.

GO-GO-GADGET LINES OF THE NIGHT:


Danny Granger: 32 points, 13 rebounds, six assists, three steals, one block on 11-19 shooting in 42 minutes in an Indiana Pacers road loss to the Golden State Warriors.

DeJuan Blair: 22 points, 11 rebounds, one assist, one steal, one block on 11-16 shooting in 35 minutes in a San Antonio Spurs home victory over the Toronto Raptors.

Carmelo Anthony: 35 points, seven rebounds, one assist in 38 minutes in a Denver Nuggets home victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder.
Monta Ellis: 36 points, five rebounds, six assists in 44 minutes in a Golden State Warriors home victory over the Indiana Pacers.

DON'T MISS:

WHIMSY:

Like Dwight Howard and Shaquille O'Neal wrestling, except the exact opposite. Indiana Pacers forward Tyler Hansbrough and Golden State Warriors point guard Stephen Curry compete in a funny faces contest. Winner gets possession.   hansbrough-curry

HIGHLIGHT REEL PART ONE:

Los Angeles Clippers forward Blake Griffin did it again for the 4,000,000th time this season in a game against the Minnesota Timberwolves last night, taking the basketball coast-to-coast, pivoting 360 degrees to avoid Corey Brewer, taking two power gather dribbles and rising up to throw down the monster slam. Did I mention he's a power forward?



HIGHLIGHT REEL PART TWO:

This dunk is so nice you have to watch it twice. Here's Griffin in the super slow motion.


HERO OF THE NIGHT:

Golden State Warriors guard Monta Ellis delivers the last-second game-winner at home, pushing the Warriors past the Indiana Pacers 110-108, much to the delight of the Oracle Arena crowd. Courtesy of YouTube user thehoopscene.


Posted on: January 13, 2011 2:00 pm
Edited on: January 13, 2011 5:15 pm
 

NBA's top scorers: Who is most consistent?

An analysis of the NBA's top 20 scorers, with a look at which players are the most consistent. Posted by Ben Golliver. kevin-durant-score

Scoring in volume has long been appreciated in the NBA. Wilt Chamberlain's 100 points; Kobe Bryant's 81; Michael Jordan's 63 points in the playoffs against the Celtics. Each of these scoring outbursts and countless others are front and center in NBA lore.

In recent years, scoring efficiently has been all the rage, with emphasis placed on players that shoot well from the field, get to the free throw line and don't require tons of shots to get their points. Players like Carmelo Anthony and Monta Ellis have drawn some criticism for their (relatively) inefficient chucking, while Chris Paul, LeBron James and Dwight Howard have received praise for their overall offensive efficiency.

But one critical aspect of scoring has been generally overlooked: consistency. Basketball coaches at every level are endlessly frustrated by players that don't bring it every night, and the NBA is no exception. Even among the NBA's elite scorers there can be a vast inconsistency in their output from night to night. 

Case in point: Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade, currently the NBA's No. 6 scorer at 25.1 points per game, scored 17 points, 11 points and 3 points in a three-game stretch in November. A little more than a month later, Wade exploded for 40 points, 45 points and 25 points in a different three-game stretch. In all six games, Wade played at least 36 minutes and took at least 13 shots. Imagine how difficult those inconsistent results are for Miami Heat coach Eric Spoelstra to plan around.

Keep in mind: Wade is one of the league's most consistent and voluminous scorers, and he would never be able to average 25 points per game if he wasn't. The inconsistency headaches for coaches only increase as you move down the depth chart or into a team's bench. Of course, there are plenty of reasons to explain scoring inconsistency: specific defensive match-ups, an opponent's defensive gameplan, nagging injuries, streaky shooting, foul trouble, the list goes on and on. 

With that said, some players are going to be more consistent than others. And that consistency would seem to be valued by coaches. So let's ask and answer an interesting question: Of the league's top scorers, who truly represents the cream of the crop? Who brings it the most consistently on a night-in, night-out basis?
Let's take a look.

Scoring Consistency

Perhaps the cleanest way to calculate a player's scoring consistency is to use his game log to calculate his average scoring variance. This reflects how far from his scoring average he is on any give night. This sounds complicated, but it's really not. 

For example, let's say I average 30 points. My two scoring totals were 20 points and 40 points. The average difference from each of those points to the average (40 minus 30 and 30 minus 20) is 10. Now, let's say I average 30 points but I scored 31 points one night and 29 points the next. The average difference between those points and the average (31-30 and 30-29) is 1. Obviously, I would be scoring more consistently in the second example, when my average variance is 1, rather than the first example, when my average variance is 10.

To further emphasize consistency, simply divide that average variance by the player's points per game. This gives a percentage between 0% and 100%. 0% is perfectly consistent, while 100% is completely inconsistent. In the first example, my percentage would be 33% (10/30). In the second example, my percentage would be 3.3% (1/30). We'll refer to that percentage as a player's Shake. The lower the Shake, the more consistent the player's scoring.

When you analyze the league's top scorers or No. 1 scoring options, almost all of them fall between 20% and 30% on this Shake scale. In other words, they won't always produce totally consistently, but they will produce within a fairly narrow range.  If you move to reserve players, that number usually falls to 40% to 50%, a reflection of changing minutes and a generally lower talent level. If you move to the deep, deep bench players, a 60%+ isn't totally uncommon. 


The League's Best Scorers, By Consistency

In this analysis, Shake was calculated for each of the NBA's top 20 scorers in games played through Tuesday, Jan. 12. 

When we look at a scatterplot of the league's elite scorers in terms of their consistency, a few interesting pieces jump out. (Click here for the full-size version .) On this chart, the X-axis refers to points per game. The further to the right you go, the more a player scorers. The Y-axis represents scoring consistency: the lower you go, the more consistent a player is, the higher you go, the more inconsistent a player is. The best place to be on this chart is the lower right hand corner and its vicinity. Conversely, the worst place to be on this chart is the upper left hand corner and its vicinity.

shake-vs-ppg

First, Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant is absolutely in a class by himself. He's the league's best scorer, in terms of both volume and consistency, by leaps and bounds. Last year, Durant made headlines for his insane streak of 25+ points in a game and his consistency is off the charts again this year. His rating (13.68%) blows away the next closest player, the Los Angeles Clippers' Eric Gordon (20.4%).

Gordon is probably the biggest surprise in the top 20, as he's the league's No. 10 scorer but it's No. 2 most consistent scorer. Both Gordon and Durant succeed at an often-overlooked aspect of the game: getting to and converting from the free throw line. Whether Gordon will be able to maintain this scoring consistency through the rest of the season is an open question, but Durant is a shoo-in to retain his crown as the league's most consistent scorer.

Also interesting: compare LeBron James and Dwyane Wade of the Miami Heat. Both players score virtually the same number of points (James averages 25.4 points while Wade averages 25.1 points) but they do so with a meaningfully different amount of consistency (James is at 21.9% while Wade is at 28.3%). James' consistency is super-elite while Wade's is merely very, very, very good. If you're looking to make the case that James is now the alpha dog in Miami, these numbers help support that. Regardless of whether Wade is hot or cold, James is getting his numbers. It's worth noting that Wade did start the season slowly and his consistency may improve as the season continues. 

Next, you'll see that players who have drawn the "inefficient volume shooter" label, guys like Carmelo Anthony and Monta Ellis, don't fare so well when it comes to consistency. This shouldn't come as a surprise, as the 3-17 nights that draw their fans' ire will obviously increase their inconsistency rating. But, Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant, who is often criticized for calling his own number and breaking out of his team's offense, rates as the league's No. 3 most consistent scorer. It's an especially impressive achievement at 32 years old, as Dallas Mavericks forward Dirk Nowitzki is the only other player in the top 10 for consistency that's over 30 years of age. 

Finally, as if you needed another reason to drool over Los Angeles Clippers rookie forward Blake Griffin, here you go. As the only rookie in the league's top 20 in scoring, Griffin also finds himself as the 13th most consistent player in the group (26.3%). In other words, he's coming by all those points honestly, and he's doing it on a night-in, night-out basis like few rookies in the recent past. It's possible that in a few years, should his 60% free throw shooting improve dramatically, Griffin could move into the league's top five most consistent scorers.

Full Rankings

In case you're interested, here are the full rankings for the top 20 NBA scorers in terms of their consistency.

shake-table


 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com