Tag:Deron Williams
Posted on: November 1, 2011 11:30 am
 

Report: Salary cap will not drop for 2011

By Matt Moore

Back when this delightful lockout began, the words "hard cap" were still very much in play. The idea was that the owners were going to get everything they wanted, exactly as they wanted them, and that included a hard cap that would be substantially lower than the cap structure in the prior CBA. That had some pretty terrifying consequences for big-spender teams who might have seen forced cuts of superstars they'd worked hard to acquire, or an inability to build on the core they've built. The Knicks, for example, might have been stuck with the basics of last year's squad, unable to improve enough around the two stars to compete for a title. Luckily for them, the hard cap has been removed from the conversation, replaced with luxury tax discussions while the league continues to pound the union's BRI into oblivion. 

In fact, the cap structure won't change and will actually increase next season, according to the New York Post:  
According to multiple sources, one of the resolved issues in a new CBA is the 2011 salary cap will remain at the level as it was in 2010 -- $58 million.

“That’s what we’ve been discussing, though the exact dollar amount is not set until the new deal is done,’’ said one league source, who added no new talks have yet been scheduled.

Economic projections from sources say the salary cap will then grow to about $60-$61 million in 2012, when the Knicks will have the largest cap space in the league and have room to woo either Chris Paul, Deron Williams or Dwight Howard, who are slated to become free agents. The Knicks could be at least $20 million under the projected 2012 cap.
via Knicks owner Dolan works to keep NBA salary cap same size - NYPOST.com.

So the Knicks' dream of building their own superteam is alive and well, and their pursuit of the final piece of the puzzle begins this year (or may have already started depending on your take on the Isiah Thomas rumors). They'll have to make some tough choices, though, what with needing to build supporting pieces as well as nab one of the 2012 big three. It'll be interesting to see Dolan's response to the new luxury tax and just how much is too much for the MSG mogul. 

But for those that enjoy this era of super-teams, the cap will remain in place to make it a possibility.  
Posted on: October 15, 2011 12:00 am
 

EOB Roundtable: Lockout Winners and Losers



By Matt Moore


Matt Moore:So who, individually is winning and losing the lockout? My brief list. 
Winners: David West, Greg Oden (rehab). Kevin Garnett, Kobe Bryant, Steve Nash (age). Kevin Love, Dwyane Wade (image). 
Losers: Rookies (obv.). DeAndre Jordan ($$$$$). 
Royce Young: Derek Fisher. I think he's increased his image as the statesman of the NBA. I don't know how good a job he's really doing, but he always comes across as measured, professional and calm. The guy's in the twilight of his NBA career, but his performance as president of the union is going to net him a pretty sweet gig after he retires, I think. Front office exec? Coach? The next Billy Hunter? I could see basically anything for Fisher. 

Ben Golliver: I hate to say it but I think LeBron James and Dwyane Wade are big winners here. No one entered the offseason with more motivation to bring their A-game to the 2011-2012 season after that jenga collapse in the Finals. As the lockout dragged on, the usual motivating factors for the average player disappeared. Watching these guys workout, play in exhibition games, etc. it's clear they will be ready to go from day one. They will blitz some people hard out of the gate and should stack up enough victories early to get the rest they wanted before last year's playoffs. Same thing, to a lesser extent, goes for Kevin Durant, who has just been a maniac.

Of the younger guys, I like what John Wall and Brandon Jennings did to increase their exposure. Whether that counts for anything long-term is anyone's guess. Both elevated their profile for sure. I still like what Deron Williams and Ty Lawson did, accepting the challenge of a different lifestyle and continuing to play in competitive leagues. Williams took a significantly bigger risk, but as long as he comes home without injury he will be a winner in my eyes. Zigging when everyone zags deserves some kudos. Props to Kyrie Irving and Isaiah Thomas and the other rookies that went back to school. We get on people for jumping too early but never give the round of applause for guys who get back on the diploma track.

They are bigger picture winners.

Eddy Curry is the biggest loser of the lockout and, really, of life. Scratching from exhibition games is really the bottom of the barrel. Same thing goes for Michael Beasley and Matt Barnes and their idiotic antics. Nobody needs any of that. Beasley caught a break when Rick Adelman got hired. He is about to get a great coach. Let's see if he embraces or squelches this opportunity. Take a guess at which is more likely. 
Matt Moore: I'd argue Deron's a loser. He made the money but admitted it's been hard on the family and they're not winning and the attendance is terrible. As the biggest star to go he was under pressure to convert that opportunity into success. Making the money, which is always dicey overseas, doesn't make up for the other problems and the lack of impact. 

Ben Golliver: If it was that bad he would have left. He's said its brought his family closer together and has been a one-in-a-lifetime experience. I think we can take him at his word about that.

Royce Young:I definitely agree with that, Matt. Deron messed up, in my mind. The Besiktas deal really didn't turn out to be all that lucrative and instead of pimping his profile here in the charity pro-am games, he's toiling away in Turkey in front of half empty arenas. What's so great about that?  If it was just intended to be a family vacation, good for him, but I don't know why you can't just go to Turkey. Why sign to play for Besiktas? He got less than other superstars because he signed so early and I don't think he's really gained a whole lot out of it otherwise. 

Matt Moore: Also, if we're talking bigger picture winners, no player is a winner because they lost a bazillion dollars between negotiations and lost paychecks.

Ben Golliver: Name one player who made more money playing basketball during the lockout than Deron Williams.

Royce Young: I don't think that's the point though. He didn't make all that much in relative terms, plus hasn't benefitted as much as some other players that stayed here. Williams is a star player. And he's the only star that signed overseas. Don't you think that's a little weird? 

Ben Golliver: Not at all. He was in a unique situation with his contract extension coming up, with an open mind, a desire to see the world and make money, and a team that would give him a max contract even if he broke both his legs because they already mortgaged the franchise for him. Why single someone out for criticism because he made a unique choice that will prove to be in his best interests as long as he doesn't get hurt (and could still be in his best interests even if he does)? This was a great way to get back in shape after an injury, it took guts, he's getting rewarded and he is living life on his own terms, not those of the NBA owners. He's not begging fans to let him play on Twitter, he proactively sought a deal that will pay him more than any other player during the down time and will be ready to go when the NBA is back. It wasn't a decision many stars could make but there were good reasons behind it and he showed courage. That makes him a winner to me. 
Posted on: October 8, 2011 4:06 pm
 

Deron Williams admits Besiktas is not selling out

Posted by Ben Golliver

deron-williams-besiktas-turkey
A few days back
, we noted that New Jersey Nets All-Star point guard Deron Williams, who signed to play with Besiktas of Turkey during the ongoing NBA lockout, is struggling to adapt to the European game. 

On Friday, Williams penned a diary entry on ESPN.com in which he discusses the transition to Besiktas. He notes that its a great bonding experience for his family, that he's still getting used to the spacing of the European game, that he's slowly building chemistry with his new teammates and that he's still getting back into 5-on-5 game shape.

All interesting details. But the following was buried at the bottom, and it sure jumps out. 
The arena we play at seats 3,200 people max, so it's not quite the same environment of an NBA game and it hasn't been full yet because these aren't the really big games. Once we start the Turkish league games, it will be different, I think. But the fans that have been at the games are really good fans. They're really into the game nonstop from tip-off and knowledgeable about it. They've been great to play in front of. 
Yes, you read that correctly. A high-profile NBA All-Star who is arguably one of the top 10 basketball players in the world cannot fill a 3,200 person stadium while playing for one of the higher-profile international professional teams. Williams isn't necessarily a high-flyer, but he plays an exciting game, boasting great vision, an array of attacking dribble moves and an ability to finish in a variety of ways. He's one of those guys near the top of the list of NBA players you would "pay to see," as the saying goes, yet he's drawing a crowd that is no more than 20 percent of an averge NBA crowd.

There's certainly value in landing a high-flight player like Williams, and perhaps Besiktas has some incredible marketing campaigns going on outside the arena to further capitalize on his presence, but it's fair to wonder whether they are getting their money's worth on the multi-million dollar contract they reportedly paid him. Ticket sales are the bread and butter of basketball economics. That base generally needs to get covered if you hope to recoup a major salary investment like the one Besiktas and its sponsor made in Williams.

On the bright side, at least Besiktas is outdrawing the Las Vegas "Lockout League," which struggled to bring in 50 fans on some days. In the end, Williams' experience is Turkey is simply further proof that the NBA and its players badly need each other to reach their respective economic best interests.
Posted on: October 6, 2011 11:40 am
 

Deron Williams is struggling in Europe

By Matt Moore

Sounds like a great vacation, right? See the sights, try local food, experience a new culture. And hey, play some basketball with guys who aren't even in your league. You can drop 40 a game if you really want to, but you won't, because you're a guest in their country. 

Turns out it's not quite that easy for Deron Williams with Besiktas in Turkey. From ProBasketballTalk.com:  
Williams led Besiktas into the EuroCup last week, which is a second tier tournament that took place in Belgium, and he had 7 points on 3 of 13 shooting with 6 turnovers. The man who should dominate at this level watched his team get eliminated fast.

Days before that in D-Will’s debut for Besiktas he was 3 for 15 shooting.
via Deron Williams not impressing anyone in Europe so far | ProBasketballTalk.

Williams told the New York Times that he's getting bumped around so much, it's difficult for him to adjust. So to review, he can't hit shots, and the guy who's less than four months removed from wrist surgery is getting lots of contact without an NBA training staff around. 

That sound you hear is Mikhail Prokhorov saying "No, really, 52 percent BRI is fine!"  
Posted on: September 27, 2011 12:46 pm
Edited on: September 28, 2011 5:52 pm
 

NBA 2K12 overall player ratings unveiled

Posted by Ben Golliver

nba-2k12-player-ratings

Player ratings for the popular basketball video game, NBA 2K12, continue to leak in advance of the game's Oct. 4 release.

A few weeks back, we noted that Miami Heat All-Star forward LeBron James was poised to lead the league in overall ranking with a 98, topping Los Angeles Lakers All-Star guard Kobe Bryant, who checked in at 94.

Unofficially, just nine current NBA players check in with ratings at or above "90".  All nine, including James and Bryant,  were All-Stars last season. The others: Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade, Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard, New Orleans Hornets guard Chris Paul, Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant, Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose, New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony and New Jersey Nets guard Deron Williams

A number of teams from the past are also included in the game. The 1992-1993 Chicago Bulls are included, led by Michael Jordan, who is rated a 99, and Scottie Pippen, who is rated a 90. Jordan also receives a 99 on the 1997-1998 iteration of the Bulls while he scores just a 92 on the 1985-1986 team.

An expanded list of player rankings has been uploaded to YouTube by user NBA2K12stuff. More rankings have been revealed or compiled by PastaPadre.com and Examiner.com.

Here's a compiled list of ratings for some star players from those sources. Remember: this year's rookie class is not included in the game.  

LeBron James -- Miami Heat -- (98)
Dwyane Wade -- Miami Heat -- (96)
Kobe Bryant -- Los Angeles Lakers -- (94)
Dwight Howard -- Orlando Magic -- (93)
Chris Paul -- New Orleans Hornets -- (93)
Kevin Durant -- Oklahoma City Thunder -- (92)
Derrick Rose -- Chicago Bulls -- (92)
Carmelo Anthony -- New York Knicks -- (91)
Deron Williams -- New Jersey Nets -- (90)
Russell Westbrook -- Oklahoma City Thunder -- (88)
Amar'e Stoudemire -- New York Knicks -- (88)
Pau Gasol -- Los Angeles Lakers -- (86)
Rudy Gay -- Memphis Grizzlies -- (86)
Andre Iguodala -- Philadelphia 76ers --(85)
Blake Griffin -- Los Angeles Clippers -- (85)
Dirk Nowitzki -- Dallas Mavericks -- (85)
Manu Ginobili -- San Antonio Spurs -- (85)
Rajon Rondo -- Boston Celtics -- (85)
Tim Duncan -- San Antonio Spurs -- (84)
Joe Johnson -- Atlanta Hawks -- (84)
Josh Smith -- Atlanta Hawks -- (84)
Steve Nash -- Phoenix Suns -- (84)
Monta Ellis -- Golden State Warriors -- (83)
Kevin Garnett -- Boston Celtics -- (83)
Stephen Jackson -- Milwaukee Bucks -- (83)
Gerald Wallace -- Portland Trail Blazers -- (83)
LaMarcus Aldridge -- Portland Trail Blazers -- (83)
Zach Randolph -- Memphis Grizzlies -- (83)
Paul Pierce -- Boston Celtics -- (82)
Eric Gordon -- Los Angeles Clippers -- (82)
Joakim Noah -- Chicago Bulls -- (82)
John Wall -- Washington Wizards -- (82)
Kevin Love -- Minnesota Timberwolves -- (81)
Al Jefferson -- Utah Jazz -- (81)
Danny Granger -- Indiana Pacers -- (81)
Chris Bosh -- Miami Heat -- (80)
Tyreke Evans -- Sacramento Kings -- (80)
Tony Parker -- San Antonio Spurs -- (80)
Stephen Curry -- Golden State Warriors -- (80)
Andrew Bynum -- Los Angeles Lakers -- (79)

Hat tip: Welcome To Loud City 
Posted on: September 23, 2011 2:43 pm
Edited on: September 23, 2011 2:54 pm
 

Kobe Bryant offered $6.7 million by Italian team

Posted by Ben Golliverkobe-bryant-drive

There's a new leader in the clubhouse, and it should come as no surprise that it's Los Angeles Lakers guard Kobe Bryant.

The Associated Press reports that Bryant, the NBA's highest-paid player, has been offered a $6.7 million contract to play for Virtus Bologna of the Italian Serie A basketball league for a season. That figure is the largest reported offer made to an NBA player during the ongoing NBA lockout. 
The Los Angeles Lakers superstar spent part of his youth in Italy while his father played there. He speaks Italian, prompting Bologna to hope he might return if there's an NBA lockout.

Virtus Bologna general manager Massimo Faraoni tells The Associated Press he's been on conference calls between Bryant's agent, Rob Pelinka, Bologna president Claudio Sabatini and main sponsor Canadian Solar, which would provide the cash for such a deal.

"I think the fact that he's lived in Italy makes this appealing to him," Faraoni said.

Virtus has given Bryant four different contract options, stretching from the one-year deal to two-month and one-month options, and a per-game deal that would come out to $739,640 per home game.

Bryant's father, Joe "Jellybean" Bryant, played in Italy with Rieti, Reggio Calabria, Pistoia and Reggiana from 1984-1991. The elder Bryant now coaches the Los Angeles Sparks in the WNBA.
This offer, like previously reported short-term offers from Virtus Bologna, includes an opt-out clause should the NBA finally reach a new labor agreement with the National Basketball Players Association.

The size of this offer trumps deals given to New Jersey Nets All-Star point guard Deron Williams, who signed a deal that reportedly could pay him up to $5 million to play for Besiktas of Turkey, and free agent forward Kenyon Martin, who recently signed a Chinese Basketball Association record deal totalling $3 million to play in China for Xingiang Guanghui. Bryant has previously received reported offers or interest from Besiktas and China but those offers were not as clear and firm as this offer appears to be. 

By comparison, the $6.7 million on the table from Virtus Bologna equates to 26.7 percent of what he was set to be paid by the Lakers next season. Bryant was set to make an NBA-high $25.2 million during the 2011-2012 NBA season and is scheduled to make $27.8 million in 2012-2013 and $30.5 million in 2013-2014.
Posted on: September 10, 2011 9:42 pm
 

Deron Williams leads Besiktas to win in debut

Posted by Ben Golliver

deron-williams-turkey

If you were in the "I'll believe it when I see it crowd" with regard to New Jersey Nets All-Star guard Deron Williams' decision to play professionally in Turkey, you can officially believe it.

Williams made his debut for Besiktas on Saturday, just two days after arriving in Turkey, where he was mobbed by fans at the airport. Besiktas defeated Italian club Montepaschi Siena, 93-91, in a touranment in Italy. Williams finished with 14 points, eight rebounds and six assists in 18 minutes of action according to NetsDaily.com.

Reacton to the first game was positive from both player and coach.

Williams explained on Twitter that his appearance wasn't necessarily planned.
Went to the gym to watch the team play today! Shot around for a couple min and then decided to play and got a [Win]! #WhyNot 
A translated TotalBasket.com quoted Williams' coach calling him "the biggest player in Europe."

Besiktas coach Ergin Ataman [said about] Deron Williams, the new star for the team after the game on Twitter, "I have seen so far the biggest player in Europe."

Back in Nov. 2010, former NBA All-Star Allen Iverson lost in his debut appearance for Besiktas. By January, reports surfaced that Iverson would leave Besiktas due to a leg injury.

Now that the "Will Williams actually show up in Turkey?" question has been answered, attention turns to the obvious next question: "How long will he last?"
Posted on: September 8, 2011 3:02 pm
 

Deron Williams officially arrives in Turkey

Posted by Royce Young



There was a bit of hemming and hawing over Deron Williams great Turkish adventure, but he's finally there. Officially. Pictures, video and reports prove it. (Here's a video of him arriving with a crowd surrounding him.)

Williams arrived wearing a Texas Rangers ballcap and had his wife and four children to join his new team, Besiktas, which begins play later this month. The team is starting training camp and to fulfill his duties under contract, Williams is there now.

Hopefully this little paid vacation is short lived though because Williams does possess an NBA opt-out clause that would allow him to return to the Nets if the lockout is resolved.

Via Nets Daily
 
 
 
 
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