Tag:Mike D'Antoni
Posted on: November 14, 2010 5:44 pm
Edited on: November 14, 2010 5:47 pm
 

Report: Knicks will inquire about Steve Nash

Posted by Royce Young

I'm sure as soon as the words "trading block" and "Steve Nash" popped up in the same sentence anywhere, Mike D'Antoni probably sprained his back jumping up so quickly to run to Donnie Walsh's office.

And that's the word according to the New York Daily News. The Knicks will inquire about Nash's potential availibility, performing what the report called, "due diligence."

The interesting part is, there really hasn't been an actual rumor saying Steve Nash is actually available or even potentially available. All this really came from was ESPN's Ric Bucher who was just talking about big name players he could see being traded before the deadline.

Now of course that doesn't mean Nash hasn't been part of trade discussions for the Suns. Right now, they're 4-4 and possibly headed for an average season. Nash is 36 and won't be available to the Suns for their future plans.

D'Antoni wouldn't comment on the possibility of rejoining Nash. But the thought is certainly interesting. Not only did the two have some of their best success together, the fact that Amar'e Stoudemire is already there also kind of makes the situation intriguing.

But of course it's a little doubtful that Nash would want to go to New York, a place that might not be in a position to contend, something Nash obviously is looking for.

This whole Nash thing is kind of picking up a weird amount of steam when there might not be anything there. It makes sense for Phoenix to shop Nash if things go south this season, but the rumors are nothing more than that at this moment.

And the Knicks are just making an inquiry. The way I imagine this going is Donnie Walsh picking up the phone and calling Suns GM Lance Blanks and saying, "Hey, is Steve Nash available?" and Blanks saying, "No." Then Walsh saying, "Well, is there anything we can do to make him available?" and Blanks saying, "Hold on. (Looking over the Knicks roster.) Probably still no."

Really, it's not news, even though I'm writing about it like it is. I would assume a lot of inquired are made for a lot of players. General managers call other general managers and see who's available and who's not. I think it would be bigger news if the Knicks weren't going to inquire about Nash.
Posted on: October 20, 2010 12:27 pm
Edited on: October 20, 2010 12:28 pm
 

MeloDrama Update: Knicks back in the act?

Melo talks swinging towards New York, away from New Jersey. Posted by Matt Moore

So the season starts in a week, and Melo is still a Nugget. Will he stay there?

After our own Ken Berger reported last week that the Nuggets remain intent on moving him, there's word picking up that the Knicks may be getting back into the talks. Chris Sheridan reports that the Knicks are trying to work out a deal to move either Danilo Gallinari or Anthony Randolph to acquire a player that the Nuggets have more of an interest in. It's a curious report, in that you'd think that either A. Denver would be satisfied with a young forward with either shooting prowess or considerable athleticism, or if they did want one of those moved for an asset, it would be a draft pick they'd be shopping for. 

New York's pick this season was held by Utah due to the last of Isiah Thomas' genius maneuvers. In trying to clear space to bring in one of the Big 3 free agents, the Knicks obtained Tracy McGrady's expring contract from Houston. In return, they had to agree to a pick swap this year and to give Houston its 2012 pick as well. Teams are restricted from trading consecutive first rounders. 

If the Nuggets move Anthony, they'll be in a rebuilding mode. And while acquiring good players is good for the ticket sales, it's draft picks and movable assets that will help them get back into contention through a rebuilding process. 

It's still hard to see a scenario in which the Knicks can get back into this thing, unless the Nuggets are beginning to relent to Melo's pressure to move him, and move him where he wants. 

There are numerous reports that the Derrick Favors angle that would send Anthony to New Jersey is dead, based off of both the Nuggets and Nets backing off. Favors looked good in the second half against New York last night, after a dreadful preseason, so both sides have reasons to walk away from the deal. 

After seeing the Knicks in preseason, it would actually be kind of unfortunate to see Anthony wind up in New York at the cost of their young nucleus. Randolph and Gallinari provide a nice balance to each other's games, Stoudemire looks every bit the superstar they signed him to be, and Timofey Mozgov looks like a promising center prospect. Even Raymond Felton looked like the guard they need him to be for the first time last night. Adding Melo would give them a second superstar and a major scoring threat, but would also damage their flexibility and versatility, things which are important in Mike D'Antoni's system. 

We'll have to see if the Knicks feel they have to strike while the iron is hot or not. 
Posted on: October 15, 2010 9:55 am
 

Shootaround 10.15.10: Good and bad places

Dwight Howard thinks the new rule has its place, Monta Ellis' wife is keeping him in the right place, Andre Blatche needs a new place, and Al Jefferson is getting into a good place, all in today's Shootaround.
Posted by Matt Moore

So while the Union's suing and the Celtics are freaking out, Dwight Howard has come out and said that in regards to the new tech rules, "They want us to cut down on talking to the refs, as hard as that may be. We've adjusted to everything else that's put out there. So we'll adjust." That's right. The guy that watches cartoons, does funny voices, and is pretty much known as a big kid, he's the one who's being grown up about this. The world's gone mad. Dwight Howard is in a place where he can have perspective and Kevin Garnett is not. What is happening?

Marvel Comics is teaming up with ESPN and the NBA for a series of promotional spots . Does it bother anyone else how much the league is marketing towards the storyline of LeBron leaving Cleveland? Don't get me wrong, I've been softer on James than others because if you asked me if I wanted to go work somewhere nicer with two of my friends with a greater chance of success, I'd probably do it too. But rubbing Cleveland's nose in it constantly for marketing purposes and playing into their spurned response seems exploitive.

Monta Ellis is in a much better place emotionally and mentally. Why? Dude got married and his wife, a lady cop, has him in line. I can understand where Ellis is coming from, as I'm sure a lot of men can. You have your wilder 20's, jacking up shots and riding mopeds, and then you get married and that stuff gets thrown out. This would be better if she were a segway cop or something. Still, it's good to see Ellis in a better place.

Mike Wells of the Indy Star reports that both Dahntay Jones and Solomon Jones are on the block as the Pacers try and move for a big man.

TruthAboutIt.Net's Kyle Weidie is more concerned with Andre Blatche at the moment than Gilbert Arenas. Blatche boosted his stock immensely last year with some solid play on the blown-up Wizards. But he thinks of himself as a primary scoring threat, not as a complimentary piece, and has big chemistry issues. If they can get him on the market and get a good player to put next to Wall for him, they should move, and quickly.

Alvin Gentry is telling his team that if they want to be succesful this year, they're going to have to be a "GREAT" defensive team . This for a team that had a worse defensive rating than any of Mike D'Antoni's years. Even if you think Amar'e was the problem (and he wasn't), good luck with that, coach.

Sasha Vujacic suffered a concussion in practice and is out indefinitely. Perhaps he was confused on what being "unconscious" from the arc meant.

In case you missed it last night , you need to see John Wall destroying the Bucks in 40 secons. For real.

Mike D'Antoni called Anthony Randolph a "stat magnet. " If only that magnet wasn't similarly charged to that of a "high basketball IQ magnet" because Randolph seems to repel that idea. Many, Knicks fans especailly, hope this is the season that changes. He can be an absolute game-changer when his head's in the right place.

And finally, just a small basketball note. If you caught last night's Jazz game you saw this, but if you didn't, Al Jefferson looked really good. Even with an out-of-shape Deron Williams working with him, Jefferson was hitting from all over the floor and attacking the glass on both sides of the ball. Defensively he's still figuring the system out, but things are looking tremendously good for Utah's new acquisition.


Posted on: September 1, 2010 8:34 am
Edited on: September 1, 2010 9:30 pm
 

Will the Knicks make the playoffs?

Posted by Matt Moore

Fall is here, hear the yell, back to school, ring the bell ... The NBA season is right around the corner, and NBA training camp starts in just a few short weeks. To get you ready for the NBA season, we've put together 25 pop quizzes. Pencils ready? We continue our Pop Quizzes with this question..

Will the Knicks make the playoffs?

The Knicks are brand new. Fresh out the oven, piping hot, clean waxed, new car smell, brand spankin' new. And that's certainly a good thing as all but the last remnants of the epic failboat that was built there over the last decade have been cleansed and a new team stand in its place, faster, younger, and better built to contend. The Knicks have a bonafide star in Amar'e Stoudemire, a solid point guard in Raymond Felton, a tantalizing wing in Danilo Gallinari, a workhorse in Ronny Turiaf, a floor-spreader in Kelenna Azubuike, and whatever you would call Anthony Randolph.

The questions are, first, is this team good enough to make the playoffs, and two, is there room in the playoffs for them? Let's work backwards.

If we're looking at potential playoff teams, the traditional approach is to take last year's crew, throw out anyone that isn't going to make the cut, then add the new entrants based on likelihood. Well, I think we can go ahead and toss the Cavs out of the "definite" category and into the "maybe" pack down there with the Knicks. Celtics are a lock, Magic are a lock, the Hawks are a near-lock with only a chemistry-based nuclear meltdown as the variable in question. The Bulls are a lock with their additions in place. It's hard to say that the Bucks will take a step back, we'll put them in "near-lock" with the Hawks. The Bobcats haven't lost anyone beside Felton outside of Tyson Chandler, who rarely played for them anyway due to injury. Felton's loss is significant, but counting out Larry Brown before the season gets started is something that's gone on a lot the last few years and worked out badly each time. And you know, I think Miami just might be a lock too, you know, if things go well and all.

So that leaves only one open playoff spot with a bunch of middle teams vying for the chance to be swept off the planet. Still, making the playoffs is a big deal. And there's an opportunity in play.

The second question is if the Knicks will be good enough. From that standpoint, there are positive, but liquid, signs. The Knicks won 29 games last season, leaving them 11 out of the playoffs. Think about that. A team with Chris Duhon, Al Harrington, and Wilson Chandler as the big contributors won 29 games. You can put almost any lineup on the floor in the NBA regular season and win close to 20 games. That's what made the Nets so remarkable.

Amar'e Stoudemire should make a huge difference. Surrounding a single star player with even semi-competent role players is usually enough for 20-25 wins. Don't believe me? The Clippers made the playoffs with Elton Brand, flanked by Sam Cassell and Cuttino Mobley. Or, just take a look at the Miami Heat over the past two seasons. From there, you're looking at 17-22 wins the rest of the new Knicks are going to have to generate.

This team is much better developed to run Mike D'Antoni's system, with Azubuike and Gallinari spreading the floor from the perimeter, Randolph running the floor and filling gaps, Felton running the pick and roll, and Amar'e finishing with a flourish. Throw in Chandler, who in a backup role is much more appealing, Ronny Turiaf as a capable rebounding center, and Toney Douglas as a combo guard with athleticism. That's a solid D'Antoni built team. The floor for this team is likely still a six game improvement over last season, but its ceiling is probably high enough to make the seventh seed.

There are still questions galore about this team. Can they defend, at all? Can they rebound? Will they stay healthy enough? Can Amar'e really thrive without Steve Nash? Is Felton enough of an upgrade at point to have the system function? What role will Eddy Curry play? Okay, I'm kidding on that last one. No one asks that. But there are doubts as to whether the Knicks will be anything more than the best lottery team next season. But taking a look over the East, it's hard to say they won't be right there for the playoffs if things go according to plan.
Posted on: August 3, 2010 7:44 am
Edited on: August 3, 2010 10:15 am
 

Shootaround 8.3.10: Pau Gasol has clown shoes

Posted by Matt Moore

All the news that's fit to sprint... get it? Get it? Okay, I'll just get to the bullets now.

  • New Suns head of basketball ops Lon Babby is looking for a "basketball genius" for his GM position. Oddly, Kevin Pritchard is not on his list of candidates. But Washington Wizards exec Tommy Shephard, along with former Hornets GM Jeff Bower and Cavs assistant GM Lance Blanks are on the list. So a guy involved in an expensive operation that resulted in one of the biggest firesales in recent memory, the man that orchestrated the run that drove CP3 to a trade demand, and a guy whose franchise is pretty much akin to smoldering ruins are on the list. That said, often these contexts hide genuine talents, so these candidates may reveal genuine success in their midsts.
  • Amar'e's search for his roots continue . This is a pretty culturally relevant escapade, and one that doesn't feel disingenuous, based off of what we know of Stoudemire. This is the same player who reads Sun Tzu and ponders philosophy while writing poetry. STAT's a deep dude, and his new ties to New York are pretty exciting in terms of what he could bring culturally as a basketball player, even if his "Hebrew" ties are overstated.
  • Mike D'Antoni will miss Team USA's trip to Turkey. He'll be replaced by Raptors head coach Jay Triano. Which is only slightly like going from a Lamborghini to a Volvo. Does Triano really have the experience needed to.. you know what? On It should bshort notice, with Coach K at the helm? We'll be okay with what we can get.
  • Kyle Weaver won't be scrapping for an NBA roster, he's signed in Israel . Weaver had the talent, but after scraping by at the bottom of OKC's roster, likely wanted the security of an overseas deal. Maybe he'll bump into Amar'e at some point.
  • The decision of what to do with Erick Dampier is a complex one for the Cats, and not one that will likely make Damp feel very loved. The options according to Bobcats Baseline are trade him for a roster-need at point guard or some other position, or waive him to take the sting off the salary. Waiving Damp makes the most economic sense. No deal the Cats will make with Dampier will really net them assets to ensure the playoffs or a deep run. These are hard times. The Bobcats need to make sure their finances are in order before they start building towards a championship. Moving Tyson Chandler was a good start. Waiving Damp would give them even more flexibility.
  • At The Hive discusses three Chris Paul misconceptions. As they want to wrap up talks on Paul since he doesn't look to be moved before the season starts, they do close by adding that New Orleans looks to be in trouble regardless of how things turn out. The one thing that could turn this whole mess around is if Dell Demps can develop Marcus Thornton and trade Peja Stojackovic's contract for high return. A move to make the Hornets contenders again could quell CP3's big dreams.
  • It should be noted as we approach the Nike Summit that Austin Rivers, Doc Rivers' son, was very impressive last weekend in AAU Play. Daddy done right with teaching that kid. He's got range, good athleticism, and great confidence on the floor. Probably understands self-motivation, too.
Posted on: July 3, 2010 9:09 am
 

Amar'e and D'Antoni together again?

KB reports that Amar'e Stoudemire has a "broad agreement" with the Knicks on a 5-year, $100 million dollar contract.

There's a million things that could change in this regard, and a milllion ways this could develop with Amar'e and other free agents over the next week. But for the time being, let's focus on what this deal would conceputally mean.

Stoudemire's best season was D'Antoni's last in Phoenix, in 2007-2008, when Amar'e posted a 27+PER to go along with 26.7 points and 9.7 rebounds (and 2.2 blocks). D'Antoni understands Stoudemire's game. It fits perfectly with the Seve Seconds or Less strategy, freeing him up to finish off the trailer in transition, and constantly in the pick and roll. It makes sense that Stoudemire would feel comfortable going back to a coach that for the most part simply told him what he was doing was awesome.

But there are questions. Stoudemire, in all likelihood, is not going to have a quality point guard, much less Steve Nash, running the show if he takes the New York deal. He won't have the plethora of shooters at his disposal. And if the Knicks are unable to find another max free-agent willing to play with him, he'll be solely responsible for bringing the New York Knicks back to prominence. That's a lot of pressure for a tough situation.

But money talks, and right now, the Knicks' gums are flapping. We'll see if the medical tests come out clean on Amar'e, and if he elects to take on this massive responsibility.
Posted on: July 2, 2010 1:06 am
Edited on: July 2, 2010 1:29 am
 

Inside the Knicks' presentation to LeBron

Getty Images Forbes Magazine hits us with a pretty stunning scoop : the PowerPoint presentation the Knicks gave LeBron James Thursday morning, provided by a New York marketing firm, Interbrand.

The cliff notes? LeBron can make a billion dollars in New York, for sure. He might be able to in Chicago. He can't in Cleveland or Miami. So naturally, he should come to New York! He has the highest potential earnings through the entirety of the contract by nearly $300 million more than the runner-up, Cleveland. The core of the message is this: It's not just about a bigger market. It's about New York's market specifically, and that's where the money is .

Okay, that's the short story. Here's the full monty. We're going to walk you through the slides step by step to point out some relevant factors. I'd definitely take a long read through that Forbes article and the accompanying PowerPoint:

Slide 1: Don't know if that picture of LeBron is the best you could have used. He doesn't look majestic; he looks like he's scared of some monster chasing him from behind. But a smart move pulling a picture of him from Team USA. No brand attachment to Cleveland and it prompts the memories of how Kobe Bryant was a bigger deal in China in 2008 because of the championships.

Slide 2: Some backside kissing of James and the work he's put in, and then the exposition of the study's intent. This is our first big revelation of the study. Interbrand examined four teams for the study, based on estimated market impact: the Knicks, the Bulls, the Heat, and the Cavs. Notice who's missing there? The Nets. There is no mention of the Nets throughout the entire presentation, despite the very frontal attack the Nets have laid on the Knicks as the key to the New York market. With all of the extraneous business opportunities the Nets are offering James through their move to Brooklyn in 2012, this could be a huge mistake. James and company had just gotten through listening to the Nets pitch when the Knicks came in and completely ignored the team that had been in the building twenty seconds before, and whose minority owner is a close friend and mentor to LeBron. Comparing New York to the other markets is a great idea. Ignoring an attempt to differentiate between the Knicks and Nets was a mistake that easily could have been rectified.

Slide 3: Provides a background to Interbrand and what they were attempting to focus on with this study. "Lifetime earnings" is a key factor. This entire study is built upon the concept that James' next stop is his last.

Slide 4: Methodology of what Interbrand looked at and how they modeled it. It's a conceptually strong slide, even if it doesn't actually provide examples of how it quantifies factors (like the post-retirement economic models of players like Wilt Chamberlain and Reggie Miller, especially when outside of Michael Jordan, those players considered really can't be compared to LeBron's theoretical revenue stream). Then again, I sincerely doubt James is going to be looking for them to provide their formulas and double checking with his own advanced statistics team.

Slide 5: A nifty graphic that illustrates the data movement that helps Interbrand quantify brand strength. Interesting stuff. If you're a marketing executive in New York with an emphasis on sports. Literally dozens of people are captivated.

Slide 6: A look at revenue streams analyzed for the presentation. Interestingly, it starts with International "partnerships' which are differentiated from sponsorships. Only local endorsements are considered. Which is particularly odd since it doesn't at all go after the "in the Internet age, anyone can build an empire from anywhere" argument. The entire presentation is built on busting that concept, and the study deftly avoids it. It's hard to say if that's a strength or weakness of the presentation.

Slide 7: Interbrand's assumptions for the study: A. James will play till he's 38 (unlikely, and given the exponential year over year balance is a significant factor, kind of an important one, B. James is finishing his career with the next team he signs with (yes, because the one thing in the NBA is that things always work out as both teams think they will when they sign) and C. the model is built on the current CBA model. This makes sense given the impossibility of predicting the next CBA and that NBA salary represents such a small amount of impact on the results of the study.

Slide 8: Four factors considered in the analysis. The key take away here are on the final two points. Championships are most important, but winning a championship matters more in certain markets than others. And secondly, and this is an odd one, the longer a franchise goes without a championship, the greater the impact on the player that gets them there. This fails to consider the historic impact of previous championships. It also seems like a pretty custom tailored argument for New York (more so than the rest of the presentation). "Sure, we haven't been relevant in thirty years, but that's a good thing!"

Slide 9: A numbers breakdown. Clearly, New York outperforms the others. An interesting note, among interesting notes, is how high Cleveland ranks on these measures, despite market size, which is a key element of the rest of the study. Also, the franchise impact of the Knicks is over four times as great as Chicago . This despite Chicago having had the greatest player of all time inside of 15 years, having a massively popular merchandising brand, and operating in a major market. That the Knicks are more powerful is no shock. That they are that much more powerful is kind of stunning for a team best known in recent history for Jeff Van Gundy holding a guy's leg and John Starks getting worked by Reggie Miller.

Slide 10-13: Team by team breakdowns of the four factors and relevant takeaways. Cleveland is relevant based on the "hometown hero" concept. The study clearly is aimed not at trashing Cleveland (and offending LeBron), but taking out the rest of the competitors and looking better than Cleveland overall. Chicago and Miami bear the brunt, as Chicago is considered too volatile thanks to Jordan's shadow, and Miami is basically tossed aside as irrelevant.

Slide 14: Conclusion: "Knicks rule!" Basically, if James wins a championship and he's in New York, that's the optimum situation for him to make the most money and expand his brand the most. It's not a particularly stirring conclusion considering the Knicks both requisitioned and presented the study, but it doesn't exactly come off as the most in-depth, objective analysis. Then again, when Mike D'Antoni's also telling you he can help you average a triple double, it probably sounds pretty good.

Slide 15: No, thank you , Interbrand.

All in all, the Knicks did a good job of finding data that attacked its competitors while not coming off as tyrannical or arrogant. It simplifies the argument while providing evidence to support the common sense argument. "New York is better." The Knicks needed to prove to James that concept was sound while pitching him on the basketball side with D'Antoni. It's a fascinating insight into how this free-agency period is being played by the teams who are brokering with this monstrous class of players.

-Matt Moore




Posted on: June 28, 2010 1:53 pm
Edited on: June 28, 2010 1:58 pm
 

The coaching factor in Lebron James' free agency

Our own Ken Berger outlined for you the totality of what LeBron James is condering in his free agency courtship ritual that starts Thursday. But lost among the discussions of weather, teammates, finance, marketing, wine, women, and song is that somewhere in there, he's got to play actual basketball. And while the roster certainly plays a part in that, what about the potential head coaches he'll be leveraging a system with? Let's be clear on this, his new coach's system will be molded to fit James' game, not the other way around (ironic, since James is the one free agent with the most versatility of this monstrous class of 2010). So what exactly is he going to be examining starting Thursday at 12:01AM EST (yes, yes, we know, he's already looking at those things. Play along, will you?).

Chicago: Tom Thibodeau. Thibodeau is coming in as a blank offensive book. He's been focused on defense for the past ten years, and there's been scare discussion of what exactly Thibodeau has in mind. One thing we do know is he wants to initate the offense with Derrick Rose , capitalizing on his speed and strength. The question for James is if he's prepared to play off-ball and be set up to use his incredible array of talents, or if he wants to run the LeISO sets, as they were called in Cleveland, where he single-handedly orchestrated the offense. Certainly in crunch time those are the possessions you want, with your best player with the ball in his hand. But if James recognizes that Rose's dribble penetration and mid-range game can open up more opportunities while saving his energy, Chicago could become a lot more attractive.

New York: Mike D'Antoni. If James has visions of wanting to challenge for averaging a triple double, New York is where he needs to be. Seven Seconds or Less will boost anyone's stats, and when you examine what Shawn Marion was able to do (21.8 points, 11.8 rebounds) with a lesser skillset under the 'stache, James' numbers could be through the roof. It's the defensive side of the ball where James is likely to be hesitant. If there's one thing his playoff failures have taught him, from Detroit to San Antonio to Boston to Orlando and then Boston again, it's that defense wins championships. He's had that mantra pounded into him from the day the Cavs made the playoffs, and all his most succesful teams have been built around defense. It would take a dramatic departure for James to embrace D'Antoni's style, which would defensively result in more highlight breakaways off of turnovers, but would also make life much harder for him against the Eastern elite. Numbers aren't everything, and the team defensive numbers are likely to matter more.

Miami Heat:
Pat Riley's pitch is going to be simple. Talent matters, and if you play with Dwyane Wade, everything else is irrelevant. The problem is that while Heat coach Erik Spoelstra has made the playoffs with the Heat and won consistently, the offense has been a bit of a disaster. Too often Spoelstra has surrendered command to Wade and not induced enough off-ball movement and against playoff schemes designed to converge on ISO players (like, say, Boston), the Heat's strategy has wilted considerably. Spoelstra's defensive components should be sound, and he's well liked by the players and organization. Miami could be an attractive option if James decides he wants more control over the offense, since a simpler system will have fewer principles for him to crack.

New Jersey Nets:
Avery Johnson has experience with creating offense. His Mavericks teams were good on both sides of the ball, but under Johnson they were versatile behemoths, slayed primarily because of a series of bad matchups in the playoffs. Johnson had success using Devin Harris as a drive and create guard, and circling the offense through Dirk Nowitzki in the high post. We heven't seen James operate much in the high post, curiously, as he usually either attacks from the perimeter or sets up in the low block. Using James as a Josh Howard/Dirk Nowitzki hybrid could yield some explosive results under Avery, and his commitment to man-defensive principles could appeal to James' simplistic concept of defense without as many of the help systems he adhered to under Mike Brown.

The Clippers and Cavs currently don't have a coach. The question is if that's a good thing or a bad thing for them as they attempt to lure James. It could be good from the perspective of giving James the option of selecting his own coach from a series of candidates. But it could also look like the organization doesn't have their house in order. Both candidates the Clippers are exploring do have head coaching experience, but aren't considered top rung. And the longer the Cavs get jerked around by Byron Scott waiting on the Lakers, the worse it looks for them, especially with Danny Ferry out.

As Berger said, there's a world of things James will be considering, and he'll be the final one making the decision. Coaching in the NBA isn't the most important thing, but it's certainly a factor. And in a competition where you're judged down to the minute detail, because James simply has the luxury of examining you to that degree, things like coaching will matter. What James decides to go with will say a lot about what he thinks of his game, and where he thinks his future is best invested, system-wise.

-Matt Moore

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com