Tag:Tyreke Evans
Posted on: December 1, 2010 1:11 pm
Edited on: December 1, 2010 1:11 pm
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Game Changer 12.1.10: Kobe won't put down the gun

Posted by Matt Moore

Each game is made up of elements which help formulate the outcome. Monday through Friday, we'll bring you the elements from the night before's games in our own specialized version of the game recaps. It's not everything that happened, but it's an insight into what lead to the results you'll see in the box scores. This is the Game Changer.

THE BIG ONE: Lakers drown in a pool of Kobe


Kobe Bryant shot 9-25 last night, and given the chance, I'm pretty sure he'd shoot 18 of 50. For whatever reason, Bryant is unable to comprehend that more and more there are nights where he "doesn't have it" and continues to keep shooting the Lakers out of games, despite the fact that their offense makes it nearly impossible not to produce when executed with any reasonable set of effort. Bryant got hot in the third quarter of this game, and then:





That happened. And then more of that. Generally, lots of that. But the bigger problem of course was LA's defense, as noted by Silver Screen and Roll :

The Grizzlies ' point total of 98 doesn't look like much out of context. That's just pace masking deplorable defense on the Lakers' part. The Grizzlies' 88 possessions were the fewest of any Laker opponent this year, and their 1.11 points per trip is well above the season average for the Laker D. The problems tonight were mainly on the perimeter. Derek Fisher was egregiously bad against Mike Conley , who burned him off the dribble over and over. When Conley didn't have the ball, Fish frequently wandered away from him for no apparent reason, leaving him wideass open to make 4-of-5 three pointers. Conley, who's no one's idea of an All-Star point guard, finished with 28 points on only 16 shots (including free-throw possessions). I'm sure I don't need to tell you that 28 is far and away Conley's season high.

Kobe Bryant 's defense wasn't much better. He looked utterly indifferent to competing at the end of the court. On numerous occasions he simply refused to guard Xavier Henry . Literally, all the X Man (no idea if anyone really calls him that) had to do was jog around a light screen or even just walk to a different part of the court, and Kobe wouldn't follow him. Henry came into this game averaging five points a night and finished with 12.

Xavier Henry's emergence was downright baffling last night. His shot release is something akin to a sideways-launched screwball with the release time of a short documentary film but last night it was falling. The Lakers gave it to him, trusting the rookie would fail. He did not.

The final two possessions of this game were downright baffling. Conley dribbles off a Marc Gasol pick, Gasol rolls, and Conley attempts to throw a lob pass over Pau Gasol. Conley was right with his decision, wrong with his execution, and Pau took it away with those long meaty paws. Fast break to Kobe, who takes O.J. Mayo into the lane, Gay comes over to help, Kobe hesitates, then jumps. O.J. Mayo is not a tremendously athletic "burster." He has great top speed but not great leaping ability. He jumped higher than I've ever seen him jump, forcing Bryant to kick out to Artest who had Rudy Gay close on him. Game over.

GO-GO-GADGET LINE OF THE NIGHT:


Amar'e Stoudemire: 35 points, 9 rebounds, 2 assists, 2 steals, 1 block


Runner-Up:
Danny Granger: 37 points, 7 rebounds, 2 assists, 2 steals, 1 block



FELTON, REDUX:


Raymond Felton has gotten it. Not "is starting to get it." He has gotten it. Amid his 21 point, 7 rebound, 10 assist, 3 steal performance in last night in a win over the Nets, Felton took a high pick from Stoudemire and rolled right. As the defense sagged baseline to cut off his approach, he bounce passed to Stoudemire who finished with a fury. It was Nash-like. It looked straight out of Phoenix circa 2006. And it's the precise kind of play that Felton needed to make earlier in the season that he's making now.

With Felton on an absolutely ridiculous binge as of late, the Knicks find themselves right back in the thick of things. Felton is never going to be Steve Nash, ever, ever, ever, but if he's a dirtier, sturdier, better defensively version of Steve Nash? The Knicks can go places, like a first round playoff entrance. And after a decade of failure, that's a huge start.

The Knicks are coming around and fast.

Josh McRoberts ALLEY-OOP. THIS IS NOT A TEST. JOSH MCROBERTS ALLEY-OOP


 



FINAL THOUGHTS:


Brook Lopez gave a commanding performance in a loss last night, the first time he's looked like himself this season. He had the mid-range short-J going, which is a huge part of his game.

Roy Hibbert again looked phenomenal, even though his dominance wasn't needed with Danny Granger destroying everything in his path.

Tim Duncan had a very Walton-esque (as someone described it on Twitter) triple-double with 15 points, 18 rebounds, and 11 assists. Golden State had no answer for anything the Spurs are doing and have really fallen back into their bad defensive habits of seasons past.

Tyreke Evans is not right. Maybe it's the ankle, maybe it's the attitude, maybe it's coaching, but he is simply not the force of nature he was last season. For whatever reason, moving him to shooting guard has not worked out. Even if he may not make logical sense at the point guard position, if your team plays better with him there, how can you argue against it until you get a better backcourt partner than Luther Head?
Posted on: November 5, 2010 9:37 am
Edited on: November 5, 2010 9:38 am
 

Shootaround 11.5.10: Like That

Posted by Matt Moore

  • The Sonics mascot showed up with a sign that said "Homeless" last night. Which is adorable. I do wonder where the sign is that reads "Homeless because people didn't think it was a good idea to build me a new home" but I'm a stickler for accuracy like that.
  • Mikael Pietrus and Stan Van Gundy got into a shouting match over Pietrus being yanked in the third quarter against the Wolves. One would think in a 40 point annihilation that everyone would be happy. It's also bizarre that SVG continues to have trouble with Pietrus considering that he's been a big part of the team's success and I don't see any yelling or screaming at Vince Carter, but I'm a stickler for fairness like that.
  • Twitter has not been kind to the Celtics. Twitter is a remarkably easy interface to control, you just have to be sure to think about what you're posting before you post it. Then, if you do post something that isn't great, you need to be prepared to take responsibility for it. Or blame it on hackers. You know, either one.
Posted on: October 23, 2010 2:14 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:02 pm
 

Sacramento Kings owner: we won't contract or sell

Sacramento Kings owner Gavin Maloof says his team will not be contracted or sold. Posted by Ben Golliver maloof-brothers
 
The hot topic in the NBA this week has been the possibility of contraction, and how and why it's being used as a negotiating technique as the players and the owners work to create a new Collective Bargaining Agreement.  When the story first broke earlier this week, I took a look at how the idea could be seen as an "either you're in or you're out" challenge to small-market owners, a dare to struggling owners to fold, sell, or relocate so that they do not create unnecessary complications later on down the road during negotiations with the players.  That brings us to the Sacramento Kings, who are in a small market, have been embroiled in a lengthy struggle to get a new arena, have been linked to the city of Seattle in rumors, and who have struggled financially since falling from their glory days earlier this decade. On Saturday, Kings co-owner Gavin Maloof stated unequivocally to Joe Davidson of the Sacramento Bee that his franchise should not be linked with the recent talk of contraction, even after NBA Commissioner David Stern expressed frustration on Friday with the Kings' inability to get a new arena approved in Sacramento. 
"My optimism on there being a new building (in Sacramento) has faded completely," Stern said. "We really tried hard, the Maloofs spent a good deal of money. … And frankly, it wasn't meant to be.
"I don't have any more good ideas. Where we flow on that, right now we have a season to worry about, and I know that the Maloofs are spending their time feeling really good about their Rookie of the Year last year, their draft choice this year, their coach and the general makeup of their team."
Upon hearing Stern's quote, Gavin Maloof told The Bee: "We're not contracting. That's not going to happen. No way we'll fold – and no way we're selling."
Gavin Maloof and his brothers are widely regarded as a strong ownership group with a deep commitment to their organization. With a solid, developing young nucleus that includes 2010 Rookie of the Year Tyreke Evans and 2011 Rookie of the Year candidate DeMarcus Cousins, the team is only on the rise, both basketball-wise and finances-wise. These statements are a promising sign for Kings fans and they stand as an example league-wide, too: bullying struggling clubs won't produce instant results. With that said, surely Kings fans are reading Maloof's quote and asking themselves why he didn't explicitly rule out the possibility of relocation. While relocation is surely a better option than contraction for any NBA team, there wouldn't be a tangible difference between the two for Kings fans.
Posted on: October 22, 2010 11:52 pm
Edited on: October 22, 2010 11:53 pm
 

Pacific Division preview: Who's second best?

Posted by Royce Young



Read Ken Berger's full Pacific Division preview

One Burning Question: Who's the second best player in the Pacific?

I read something interesting by a columnist in Los Angeles earlier in the week. To summarize, basically he said Blake Griffin was the second best player in LA. Not "going to be" or "at some point will be." Nope. Right now, Griffin is one slot behind Kobe Bryant. So if Griffin is the second best player in LA, could he be the second best in the entire division?

(To refresh in case you don't have the depth charts in front of you, Pau Gasol, Ron Artest, Steve Nash, Baron Davis, Stephen Curry, David Lee, Monta Ellis and Tyreke Evans all play in the Pacific.)

I love Blake Griffin. Love everything about him. I'm an Oklahoman, went to the University of Oklahoma when Blake was there and even played little league baseball with his brother Taylor. I'm a total Blake Griffin homer. But second best in LA or the entire Pacific Divison? No. I mean, no. No way.

But the thing is, this is an open question. Griffin isn't in that slot, though I certainly think he'll be able to lay claim to that and probably in the near future, will be able to say he's the top dog in the town. But behind Kobe, figuring out who would be No. 2 isn't easy. Gasol has a great case. So does Steve Nash who has two MVP trophies. Then there's Tyreke Evans who is absolutely ridiculous. In terms of pure, young basketball talent, you're going to find plenty in the Pacific.

Since I'm asking the question, I'll give you my answer: Pau Gasol. But that's an incredibly close call with Evans. In fact, give me 10 minutes and I might change my mind. Nash is great, but not what he once was. Stephen Curry could be that guy, but he's not there yet. Baron Davis certainly looks like it some nights, but on others you wonder if he's even the second best player on his own team.

At the end of the season, this question might have a clearer answer. Heck, it could easily be Blake Griffin. In fact, I feel like the odds are pretty good there because Griffin is an absolutely insane basketball talent. But now? You've got to go with what you know and right now, we now that Pau Gasol is pretty stinking fantastic.
Posted on: October 18, 2010 9:48 am
 

Shootaround 10.18.10: Turkaboooooo

Posted by Royce Young
  • Dave Feschuk of the Toronto Star: "A fan held up a sign that summed up the purpose of an otherwise uneventful preseason walk-around: 'TURKABOO,' was the message. The rabble wasn’t exactly in midseason form, even if the Raptors pulled off a 121-100 win. ('(The booing) wasn’t as bad as Vancouver,' said Steve Nash, Turkoglu’s newly-minted teammate, speaking of the reaction of the West Coast throng that took in a Raptors-Suns exhibition 11 days previous). But Turkoglu reacted exactly as you might have expected. He openly laughed. He actually applauded the crowd during the player introductions. He even led the chorus at one point, checking in at the scorer’s table while expelling a long, 'Booooooooo!' In other words, he acted as though he didn’t care -- which is exactly how he played."
  • Gary Washburn of The Boston Globe: "The rejuvenation of Celtics forward Kevin Garnett has been apparent since the beginning of training camp. He leaps with ease. He sprints down the floor and soars for rebounds with no fear about his surgically repaired right knee. ... One of the more important priorities for the Celtics in camp was to rebuild the confidence and increase the production of Garnett, who was healthy last season but still was favoring the knee.
  • Zach Lowe of The Point Forward ranks the pick-and-roll combos: "2. Baron Davis-Blake Griffin, Los Angeles Clippers: This could be terrifying, and it really depends on how hard Baron Davis feels like working this season and if he can kick the habit of taking awful three-pointers off the bounce. Griffin could emerge as something like Stoudemire as a violent roll threat. Even in the preseason, he’s slipping screens and darting down the lane like Amar’e, and he has the athleticism and strength to finish with authority. He is going to have a highlight screen-and-roll finish every night, and he looks to have a good enough jumper to get your attention on the pick-and-pop."
  • Do the Hornets have more talent than the Bucks? And can they repeat what Milwaukee did last season? Michael McNamara of Hornets247 says so: "So across the board the Hornets have more talent than those Milwaukee Bucks and yet the perception around the country is that it is doubtful the Hornets will produce superior results. Why is that? It has to be because there has been no evidence to support the belief that the Hornets can play with that level of discipline, that level of heart, and that level of tenacity. It is because nobody knows what to expect from Monty Williams and his system. It is because people assume that at the end of the day it is talent and talent alone that wins basketball games."
Posted on: October 14, 2010 5:32 pm
Edited on: October 14, 2010 5:45 pm
 

Tyreke Evans rolls both ankles

Posted by Matt Moore

Last year's rookie of the year usually is tweaking his opponent's ankles. But lately he's having some trouble with his own. Evans tweaked his ankle badly enough in Team USA practice to miss the team's trip to the FIBA world championships. Then in last night's game versus the Lakers, he rolled not one, but two ankles. From the Sacramento Bee :
"I turned this one on a fast break on (Lakers guard) Steve Blake, and I twisted it," Evans said, pointing to his right ankle. "On the next one, I came down on (Lakers center) Theo Ratliff and twisted it. The left one hurts more."
Evans said it's just something he deals with his style of basketball, but three injuries inside three months is still enough to make you twist in your seat a touch. It's basketball. Ankles get rolled. It happens. But the only thing that could stop Evans on what looks like a meteoric rise to superstardom is injury, and particularly injuries to the legs that let him get to the rack so easy. Let's hope this is a blip and nothing to look back on and go "Oh."
Posted on: October 6, 2010 5:45 pm
 

Kentucky duo setting the early pace for rookies

DeMarcus Cousins and John Wall have huge debuts in preseason to set the tone for the ROY chase this season. And it may not be close.
Posted by Matt Moore




Say what you want about John Calipari, he finds himself some NBA quality talent. After producing the previous two Rookie of the Year award winners in Derrick Rose and Tyreke Evans, Calipari may end up having more than one horse in the race this season. Both John Wall and DeMarcus Cousins were highly touted coming out of college, but through Summer League and their first preseason games, we're already getting a sense that it may be these two, and then everyone else for the top rook trophy.

Wall-Eyed


John Wall in his first game on an NBA floor? He was remarkable. Better than expected. Preseason? Sure. But you can't argue with the kind of production he provided, and not just the numbers that pop out to you. 21 points, 9 assists, 4 steals? Great. But he shot 42% from the field, and more importantly was 9-11 from the line.  Most crucial was just two turnovers despite having the ball that much. That's absolutely huge. That numbers will rise with better competition, but just to show the ability is huge for the Wizards as they look for him to become the future of the franchise.

But don't take my words for it. Here's what Wizards blog Bullets Forever had to say on the matter:

"It's possible I underestimated the effect of John coming at you in transition will have on his stats and the team's performance.  Dallas isn't exactly the fastest team in the world, but their only chance at stopping Wall coming at full speed was to foul him. 

Wall's half-court execution does still need work, especially his pick and roll offense.  He's still learning how to attack the pick in such a way where he actually uses it well.  But on the bright side, he didn't turn the ball over much and he realized that Dallas was often playing him to pass."


That's crucial. For some reason, beyond my comprehension, there's been this feeling that Wall's a natural scorer who will have to work to set other players up. If you watched him in college at Kentucky? You know that's not true. Wall more than any other player showed a skillset that fit passing in the NBA best. His drive and kick to the baseline jumper man was automatic, except it was college and no one hits that shot in college (except for Patrick Patterson). He establishes chemistry with a big man (JaVale McGee in Washington off the bat) and works to see him in transition. He's lightning quick but sees the floor at a slower pace.

Wall has the potential to distribute with this team, the question was if he'd be allowed to among veterans who like the ball. If the preseason holds any value whatsoever, that doesn't seem like a problem. Even Gilbert Arenas in his postgame comments made it clear . This is Wall's team. And if that's the case, that Rookie of the Year award is going to be within reach from the get go.

Run DMC in Full Effect

DeMarcus Cousins slipped all the way to the Kings at number five, and honestly, there was absolutely no reason for it. His character issues are all built around on-court blowups which aren't unheard of for a kid his age, and he hasn't been in off-court trouble since his sophomore year of high school. In the meantime, he was arguably the MVP of Calipari's Kentucky team.

Sacramento knows what they have in the combustible big and have marketed him all summer. Then in his preseason debut last night, he showed what he's capable of. 16 points, 16 rebounds, are you freaking kidding me? Check out the two highlights in the first starting at 37 seconds in here . That's what he's bringing, along with what was a good looking jumper.

Cousins has so much instinctive ability at the basket, and for a team looking to run this season, he focused last night on outlet passes. That's a terrifying concept for opponents, if he's able to finish in the post and start the break while bringing in rebounds. His wide body and instincts are going to bring those rebounds in, and preseason or no, 16 boards is a heck of a lot. Cousins already looks like the steal of the draft, and his physical assets put him a leg above Blake Griffin, even before the injury, though Griffin's upside is obviously huge.

Here's what Sactown Royalty had to say on the matter of "Boogie":

On defense, he was surprisingly active, contesting shots, denying his man position.  He still needs a bit of work, but I think he could be a quality defensive presence someday, especially with his knack for drawing charges.  Another nice thing about DeMarcus is that he eats rebounds and craps nice outlet passes.  Many a fastbreak was started last night after DMC corralled the board and threw it out to Tyreke or Beno.  His solid performance was not without flaws however, as he made a few silly mistakes with the ball (including once trying to run the ball up the floor himself after a rebound, leading to a quick turnover) which led to five turnovers, all but one of them because of careless mistakes that can be fixed with experience. 

Cousins' learning curve could be high as well, depending on how he and the coaching staff mesh, which of course gets back to the attitude questions. But with that kind of opening performance and the minutes he's getting from the start, it's clear Sacramento knows what they have with him. Alongside Tyreke Evans, Cousins has a great shot of being able to compete for the trophy based on opportunity and instincts.
Posted on: September 24, 2010 9:17 am
 

Preseason Primer: Sacramento Kings

Posted by Matt Moore
 
Could we have seen it coming? Could we have known that Tyreke Evans was going to join Michael Jordan and LeBron James among the handful of players to average 20 points, 5 rebounds, and 5 assists in their rookie season? That he would make such a huge difference? Well, yeah, we should have. The question is where do the Kings, whose rebuilding project they find accelertaed, go from here? That's where we begin with the lastest in our Preseason Primers .

Training camp site: Sacramento, CA
Training camp starts: September 28th

Key additions: Samuel Dalembert (trade), Antoine Wright (free agency), Luther Head (free agency), DeMarcus Cousins (draft)

Key subtractions: Spencer Hawes (trade), Jon Brockman (trade), Andres Nocioni (trade)

Likely starting lineup: Tyrke Evans (PG), Beno Udrih (SG), Donte Greene (SF), Carl Landry (PF), Samuel Dalembert (C)

Player to watch: DeMarcus Cousins. There's no getting around it. "Boogie" is the guy you want to keep an eye on. He could dominate. He could underwhelm. He could blow up on his teammates. he could fit in seamlessly. He could add weight. He could slim down. Anything is possible with Cousins, and his progression will be a huge factor in how the Kings do this season.


Chemistry quiz: Evans needs to be the leader, and this is the season where he's got to start showing that. Meanwhile, there aer a bunch of players on the Kings like Thompson and Greene who may wind up frustrated if they can't secure their positions on the team. Throw in the explosive Cousins and you have a tenuous situation that could be brilliant, could be terrible. It's wait and see.


Camp battles: All eyes on small forward, as Donte Greene and Omri Casspi battle for control of the universe... I mean, small forward spot. Greene has more experience and athleticism, but Casspi is arguably more skilled. This is going to be and intense and close fight. Sorting out the rest of the frontcourt will be tough as well with experience (Dalembert, Landry) versus upside (Thompson and Cousins) as well as slotting positions.

Injury issues:
Evans had an ankle injury in Team USA tryouts but should be fine. Other than that, the Kings enter camp healthy.

Biggest strength: Athleticism. Evans, Thompson, Greene, Cousins, Landry. They're tough, long, and athletic. That team can create mismatches on the floor sheer length and leaping ability. Strong, too. Should be a lot of fun to watch.

Glaring weakness: Inexperience. The best thing about being young is you don't know any better. That's also the worst thing. The Kings are going to struggle as they learn how to win. Learning to be consistent starts in camp.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com