Play Fantasy Use your Fantasy skills to win Cash Prizes. Join or start a league today. Play Now
 
Tag:NBA Lockout
Posted on: July 7, 2011 4:03 pm
Edited on: July 7, 2011 6:09 pm
 

What teams risk in a lockout: Southeast Division

Posted by Royce Young



Talk of losing an entire season is a bit ridiculous to me. There's just way too much at stake. Money, momentum, fan support, money, loyalty, money -- it's just hard to imagine losing any games much less a whole season.

But it's a possibility. And with all this hardline talk going on, it seems like neither the players nor the owners are wanting to budge. There's incentive for teams to get a deal done and not just for the money, but because a year without basketball and more importantly, basketball operations, could greatly affect each and every NBA franchise. Let's start with the Southeast Division.

ORLANDO Magic
The biggest question hovering over the Magic isn't about wins and losses or if Gilbert Arenas should stop tweeting. It's all about Dwight Howard's future and July 1, 2012. That's when Howard will become an unrestricted free agent. General manager Otis Smith has already said he won't trade Howard, but that could just be talk. Howard has said he wants to be in Orlando, but hasn't committed, turning down a three-year extension.

But if NBA offices are shut down and all transactions are halted, Howard might be forced to stay with the Magic all season -- except he won't play a game. Meaning Orlando could lose out on A) having a team good enough to convince Howard he wants to stay because he can win there; B) the Magic won't have an opportunity to trade Howard and get a Carmelo-like deal where they can restock the roster instead of letting him walk with nothing in return; or C) the Magic miss out on at least one more year with Howard meaning they miss out on a chance of having a good team that can compete. That's a lot to think about if this lockout starts stretching into 2012.

MIAMI Heat
It's simple and very obvious for owner Micky Arison and the Heat: Lose the 2011-12 season and that's one less year you have of Chris Bosh, Dwyane Wade and LeBron James. That's one less year of the spotlight, the attention and all that money funneling right into South Beach. That's one less shot at a title. That's one less season of constant sellouts, through-the-roof merchandise sales and huge TV ratings.

Basically, it's one less season of $$$$$. And one big reason for Arison to be an owner willing to bargain.

ATLANTA Hawks
The Hawks are in pretty solid shape right now. After the 2011-12 season, they only have six players under contract, including all their big names (Joe Johnson, Josh Smith, Al Horford and uh, Marvin Williams I guess).

But a prolonged lockout could simmer the momentum built from last season's deep playoff run. The roster still isn't quite there and a resolution on what to do with Smith has to be figured out. The earlier he's traded means the more he's worth. Losing that opportunity is bad news for the Hawks, even if they choose to keep Smith.

But on the bright side, it is one less season of overpaying Joe Johnson.

CHARLOTTE Bobcats
The Bobcats aren't really going anywhere this year, or even next year. The roster needs work. It needs more talent, more ability and better structure.

But the Bobcats used two lottery picks on Bismack Biyombo and Kemba Walker, meaning there's a little jolt of young talent on the roster, which is exactly the direction Rich Cho is looking to take them. Younger, faster and a path to building, not just hanging on with marginal veteran talent.

A year without basketball for the Bobcats means a year of stunted growth. These guys need to play together every second they can and I don't just mean on a blacktop in Greensboro. Even if they lose 60 games, that's progress. But they need to be on the court to even have the chance to learn through losing.

Michael Jordan was a player (if you didn't know). I don't know if that means he's on the players' side because I'm sure he also wants a system that helps his franchise competitively and one that helps him make money, but at the same time, I think he cares more about winning and playing than all the rest.

WASHINGTON Wizards
It's the same story for the Wizards too. John Wall, new pick Jan Vesely, Nick Young and JaVale McGee are all young guys that just get better every night they play.

The bright side though is that Rashard Lewis is owed $21.1 million next season and that could be money well not spent. Which is why Ted Leonsis, an NHL owner who has been through an extremely painful lockout, probably isn't all that worried about things like stunted growth when there's money to be saved and made. The Wizards aren't on the path to prosperity right now and are likely one of the teams hemorrhaging a little dough. The Wizards risk setting back their development, but I think that's a price Leonsis would be willing to pay.
Posted on: July 7, 2011 2:56 pm
Edited on: July 7, 2011 3:09 pm
 

Battier: NBA can't go through what the NFL is

Posted by Royce Young

Two major American sports are currently locked out. But one is a juggernaut, a league that basically bathes in money. The other is rising back up after a down period that saw ticket sales and TV popularity slip.

That's why Shane Battier was very straightforward when he told WFAN in New York that the NBA "can't afford to go through what the NFL is going through." Battier understands the momentum in the league right now and to sacrafice it over money doesn't seem wise. Doesn't mean he thinks the players should just cave to the owners, but it means that both sides better get their butts to the bargaining table and get something sorted out before November.

Via Sports Radio Interviews:
“I’m cautiously optimistic that we will get something done before missing any games. We all know what’s at stake. We can’t afford to go through what the NFL is going through and we can’t afford to lose the fans. I just think we have a perspective after going through this in ’99 that it’s in the best interest of everybody to hammer out a fair deal.”

It's an obvious statement, but Battier said what's been the MacGuffin, if you will, in these negotiations the entire time. The NBA simply can't risk what's been built over the last six or seven years. Talent is at an all-time high. TV interest is booming. The NBA Draft had incredible ratings. Millions tuned in just to hear where LeBron would play basketball.

To potentially alienate fans over money isn't wise. Both sides recognize this. Players see it, owners get it. There's talk of hardlining this thing and an entire season being wiped out. That would seriously be about the dumbest thing ever. Monumentally stupid. And because of what Battier said is a major reason I still don't really see games being lost.

Battier also tried to summarize the biggest issues in the talks.

“I don’t know the ins and outs of the flex cap. I think it’s a pretty clever term by Commissioner Stern. The main issues for us are the revenue sharing amongst the big market teams and the small market teams. That will really lead the discussion to what share the players will share with the owners.

"The league maintains that the revenue sharing is an internal matter and they will take care of it themselves. We think it’s a huge part of the bigger picture, the big collective bargaining discussion. Once we sort of see how the revenues are going to be split amongst the teams I think that will be a huge, huge advantage to getting a deal done.”

Any advantage in getting a deal done is all I care about. I have no dog in the fight. No stake. All I care about is basketball in November. Make it happen, someone.

Category: NBA
Posted on: July 7, 2011 10:31 am
Edited on: July 7, 2011 2:45 pm
 

Reports: Deron Williams headed to Turkey

Posted by Matt Moore and Ben Golliver. deron-williams

Update (2:43 p.m.): Ken Berger throws some water on the fun, citing an agent with connections in Turkey who says "I'll believe it when I see it."

Update (11:00 a.m.)
:
 ESPN.com reported Thursday that "sources with knowledge of Deron Williams' plans confirm his intent to play for Besiktas in Turkey if lockout continues."

Original Post:
A Turkish television station is reporting Thursday that Besiktas, a Turkish professional basketball team, has an agreement in principle with Deron Williams to play for them during the lockout.  

Yowza.

Williams, who is under contract for 2011-2012 with the New Jersey Nets, would have to obtain FIBA clearance before heading to Istanbul. A source informed Ken Berger of CBSSports.com Thursday morning that the Nets had not been made aware of any such offer. That does not preclude such an offer from having been made, just that the Nets aren't aware of such an offer, though you would think they'd have some idea of the legitimacy if things were this far along. 

Williams heading overseas would be the kind of substantial move from an All-Star that could actually put the fear of God into ownership. If a wide enough swath of players are able to make decent money overseas during the lockout, that kind of takes the bite out of the lockout, the entire point of this ridiculous power play. Essentially, the owners' ability to starve the union out would be mitigated, even with lesser players unlikely to be offered similar contracts. If enough players can find ways to create income and keep the union's position strong, the owners lose their biggest power position.

The flip side is that Deron Williams is playing in Turkey, though I'm sure Istanbul is very nice. With a wife and new daughter, that can be draining in terms of travel, though probably not moreso than the normal amount of travel he does during the course of the NBA season. Additionally, television reports of this nature are often sketchy and it wouldn't be the first time an international team has leaked information about a possible signing of a major American player before the chickens were hatched. We'd advise a healthy dose of skepticism here. 

Williams would join Allen Iverson among point guards labeled (under false pretenses or not) coach killers who have played in Turkey for Besiktas. FIBA has not released an official statement regarding their plans for clearance during the lockout.  

(HT: IamaGM.com)
Posted on: July 6, 2011 7:23 pm
Edited on: July 6, 2011 7:35 pm
 

TV networks to lose $1 B if NBA season lost?

Television networks are estimated to lose $1 billion in ad sales if the entire NBA season is lost. Posted by Ben Golliver. lockout

Everybody loses if there is an NBA work stoppage. The players don't get to follow their dreams, the fans don't get to enjoy the diversion and the owners don't get to experience the thrill of chasing a championship.

But the television networks, apparently, really lose.

AdWeek.com reports that the NBA's television partners stand to lose more than $1 billion in advertising revenue should the 2011-2012 NBA season be cancelled. 
ESPN/ABC Sports and TNT stand to lose as much as $1.25 billion in ad sales revenue if the labor dispute negates the entire 2011-12 NBA campaign. Indeed, the NBA audience has become so valuable that the postseason inventory alone accounts for nearly a fifth of the full-season take.

According to Kantar Media, ESPN/ABC and TNT took in $417.7 million in total ad sales revenue over the course of the 2010 NBA playoffs and finals. The going rate for a 30-second spot in the Celtics-Lakers series: $402,000 a pop.
For comparison's sake, numbers released by Forbes.com on Wednesday indicated that the NBA has lost nearly $2 billion over the last six seasons combined. Clearly, the stakes on all sides are very high.

One takeaway from this report: The conflict of interest for the NBA's television partner networks reporting on the progress of the league's labor negotiations is massive and probably hasn't gotten enough play. If you're wondering why there is so much doomsday talk concerning the stalled labor negotiations, realize that the voices predicting doom and gloom may very well be speaking of -- or at least influenced by -- their own financial stake in the matter.

With a billion dollars on the line, any amount of progress would feel insufficient until a deal is finalized, wouldn't it?
Posted on: July 6, 2011 7:23 pm
Edited on: July 6, 2011 7:35 pm
 

TV networks to lose $1 B if NBA season lost?

Television networks are estimated to lose $1 billion in ad sales if the entire NBA season is lost. Posted by Ben Golliver. lockout

Everybody loses if there is an NBA work stoppage. The players don't get to follow their dreams, the fans don't get to enjoy the diversion and the owners don't get to experience the thrill of chasing a championship.

But the television networks, apparently, really lose.

AdWeek.com reports that the NBA's television partners stand to lose more than $1 billion in advertising revenue should the 2011-2012 NBA season be cancelled. 
ESPN/ABC Sports and TNT stand to lose as much as $1.25 billion in ad sales revenue if the labor dispute negates the entire 2011-12 NBA campaign. Indeed, the NBA audience has become so valuable that the postseason inventory alone accounts for nearly a fifth of the full-season take.

According to Kantar Media, ESPN/ABC and TNT took in $417.7 million in total ad sales revenue over the course of the 2010 NBA playoffs and finals. The going rate for a 30-second spot in the Celtics-Lakers series: $402,000 a pop.
For comparison's sake, numbers released by Forbes.com on Wednesday indicated that the NBA has lost nearly $2 billion over the last six seasons combined. Clearly, the stakes on all sides are very high.

One takeaway from this report: The conflict of interest for the NBA's television partner networks reporting on the progress of the league's labor negotiations is massive and probably hasn't gotten enough play. If you're wondering why there is so much doomsday talk concerning the stalled labor negotiations, realize that the voices predicting doom and gloom may very well be speaking of -- or at least influenced by -- their own financial stake in the matter.

With a billion dollars on the line, any amount of progress would feel insufficient until a deal is finalized, wouldn't it?
Posted on: July 6, 2011 6:05 pm
Edited on: July 6, 2011 6:41 pm
 

Report: NBA lost $1.8 billion over last 6 years

The NBA reportedly lost nearly $2 billion over the last six years. Posted by Ben Golliver. lockout

On Tuesday, we noted a back-and-forth between the New York Times and the National Basketball Association involving a dispute over how profitable the league has been in recent years. The Times used financial estimates provided by Forbes to conclude that the NBA could potentially be misrepresenting its financial losses; the NBA fired back by disputing the report in a statement, saying that the league had failed to turn a profit in each season of the recently expired collective bargaining agreement, concluding that its losses were "substantial and indisputable."

On Wednesday, Forbes.com reported that it has obtained new, audited financial information concerning the NBA's economic health. The new report references "net income," which it defines as income "after the deduction of all costs" that gives "a more definitive picture."
Sources close to the NBA labor negotiations have provided net income numbers for the league each year over the last five years, plus projected losses for the 2010-11 season. Given that the NBA is saying that they are running at a net loss, as opposed to the NFL, which is saying they are seeing profits declining, the NBA is compelled to open their books as part of labor law, and have done so. The following numbers are audited figures. If the projected figures are correct, the NBA will have lost $1.845 billion over the last six years...

The following shows the losses, as well as the number of teams that reportedly have run at a loss the last five years, plus projected losses for the 2010-11 season:

  • 05-06: 19 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $220 million
  • 06-07: 21 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $285 million
  • 07-08: 23 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $330 million
  • 08-09: 24 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $370 million
  • 09-10: 23 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $340 million
  • * 10-11 23 clubs ran at a loss, total loss of $300 million
The release of these figures marks another step in the right direction for the league, as transparency with regards to their losses has become a hot button topic, especially this week. With that said, the top-level numbers don't do much to further the NBA's case in the public eye, other than to show that their claims of a "broken system" aren't entirely without merit.

The perception of the league's financial success (TV ratings, website traffic, increased ticket sales) may in fact badly outweigh the league's actual financial success. While it might not be fair, the burden of proof falls on the NBA to fully document and explain its position of hardship. Otherwise, the assumption from a public who can't relate to the sums of money being discussed is that the league is guilty of exaggerating their losses. Skepticism will continue until a full analysis of the league's books are allowed by an independent source. 

Posted on: July 6, 2011 6:05 pm
Edited on: July 6, 2011 6:41 pm
 

Report: NBA lost $1.8 billion over last 6 years

The NBA reportedly lost nearly $2 billion over the last six years. Posted by Ben Golliver. lockout

On Tuesday, we noted a back-and-forth between the New York Times and the National Basketball Association involving a dispute over how profitable the league has been in recent years. The Times used financial estimates provided by Forbes to conclude that the NBA could potentially be misrepresenting its financial losses; the NBA fired back by disputing the report in a statement, saying that the league had failed to turn a profit in each season of the recently expired collective bargaining agreement, concluding that its losses were "substantial and indisputable."

On Wednesday, Forbes.com reported that it has obtained new, audited financial information concerning the NBA's economic health. The new report references "net income," which it defines as income "after the deduction of all costs" that gives "a more definitive picture."
Sources close to the NBA labor negotiations have provided net income numbers for the league each year over the last five years, plus projected losses for the 2010-11 season. Given that the NBA is saying that they are running at a net loss, as opposed to the NFL, which is saying they are seeing profits declining, the NBA is compelled to open their books as part of labor law, and have done so. The following numbers are audited figures. If the projected figures are correct, the NBA will have lost $1.845 billion over the last six years...

The following shows the losses, as well as the number of teams that reportedly have run at a loss the last five years, plus projected losses for the 2010-11 season:

  • 05-06: 19 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $220 million
  • 06-07: 21 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $285 million
  • 07-08: 23 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $330 million
  • 08-09: 24 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $370 million
  • 09-10: 23 clubs ran at a loss, total losses of $340 million
  • * 10-11 23 clubs ran at a loss, total loss of $300 million
The release of these figures marks another step in the right direction for the league, as transparency with regards to their losses has become a hot button topic, especially this week. With that said, the top-level numbers don't do much to further the NBA's case in the public eye, other than to show that their claims of a "broken system" aren't entirely without merit.

The perception of the league's financial success (TV ratings, website traffic, increased ticket sales) may in fact badly outweigh the league's actual financial success. While it might not be fair, the burden of proof falls on the NBA to fully document and explain its position of hardship. Otherwise, the assumption from a public who can't relate to the sums of money being discussed is that the league is guilty of exaggerating their losses. Skepticism will continue until a full analysis of the league's books are allowed by an independent source. 

Posted on: July 6, 2011 11:46 am
Edited on: July 6, 2011 5:00 pm
 

Gallinari might look at Europe?

Posted by Royce Young

Another day, another NBA player maybe, sort of, kind of thinking about playing in Europe. Danilo Gallinari told Sportando that he "couldn't rule out" at least a short run in Europe.

Of course Gallinari is from Italy and spent the early part of his professional career playing in Europe.

But like any other NBA player currently under contract, Gallinari can't just pack up and sign with a European club. FIBA has yet to clear anyone under contract in the NBA and would be risking his contract with the Nuggets if he were injured.

He's just saying he has it on his mind, especially if games are going to be lost.

Gallinari though is a bigger name that's mentioned possibly playing in Europe. And really, it's one of the best bargaining chips the players have. They'd have to first get clearance to play, but I'm sure NBA owners aren't excited about watching players hustle overseas to get paid and also risk injury. Something to maybe rush along the proceedings?

One can only hope.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com