Tag:Glen Davis
Posted on: March 3, 2011 10:02 am
 

Glen Davis will have MRI Thursday on injured knee

Glen Davis suffering with injured knee, MRI to be done Thursday.
Posted by Matt Moore

When the Celtics elected to trade Kendrick Perkins, they were confident they would be able to survive based on their depth. They signed Troy Murphy in large part to bolster that front office core, but the real work would be done by Kevin Garnett, the O'Neals (both of whom are injured), and Glen Davis. Unfortunately, there's an issue with Davis that has become singificant enough he'll be having some tests done. And it's on his knee. 

Apparently, Davis has been suffering with knee pain for a while, to the point where at several points he wondered if he could play. He continued to do so out of a dedication to the team, but on Wednesday night, From CSNNE: 

But on Wednesday night, the pain got the best of him. Davis suffered a left patella tendon strain going up for shot attempt late in the fourth quarter against the Phoenix Suns. He was helped off the court by the Celtics team doctor and will undergo an MRI on Thursday.

His status for Friday’s game against the Golden State Warriors has yet to be determined.

via Davis injures knee, will have MRI on Thursday.


Davis' dedication to his teammates in admirable. It really is. But he's got to keep an eye on the long-term. The Celtics don't really need him in March, or February, or even January. They need him in June. Putting unncessary wear and tear on the knee when the Celtics don't absolutely have to have a win jeopardizes their ability to contend when the games really matter. If the training staff was aware of this situation, they should have shut Davis down for a few games a while ago. You're begging for a tear of some sort, which could mean more missed time, or worse, surgery. It doesn't sound like that's the result in this case, but even if it's just a strain, it's more pressure on an injury that doesn't need it. 

Should the Celtics be without Davis on Friday, Troy Murphy will get more run, which may not be a great thing considering how out of shape he appeared and the coaching staff admitted he was Wednesday night. Boy, if only the Celtics had a capable center they could rely on. Oh, wait, no, nevermind, even if they'd kept Perkins, he's out two weeks, too. No win for the C's. 
Posted on: February 13, 2011 1:46 am
 

10 Keys to Celtics vs. Heat III

Five keys for Boston and Miami as the Celtics and Heat meet Sunday for the third time this season. Is this a must-win for Miami, even in February?
Posted by Matt Moore




Allright, Miami. We're going to give you one last shot at this to show us you have anything interesting to bring to the matchup against the Boston Celtics before we start tracing over our penciling in of the Celtics for the Finals. In the first two meetings between the two best teams in the East, the Heat were dispatched. Both games featured moderately significant leads for the Celtics late, runs by Miami to keep the television audience slightly interested, then workman-like elimination stretches from Boston to close things out. If the Heat want to showcase anything towards the notion that they are anything more than a cupcake-devouring regular season team, this is the time to prove it. Their showcase wins over the Lakers and Magic in the past month and a half will mean very little if the Celtics were to run up a 3-0 season series advantage.

There's no such thing as a must-win game for an NBA title contender in February. But this is about as close as it gets. 
And with that, here are five keys to Boston and five keys to Miami for Sunday's afternoon delight between the Heat and the Celtics. 

Boston Celtics



1. A Pointed Exchange

Rajon Rondo isn't just the best point guard on the floor, he is arguably the third best overall player in this matchup.  He's certainly made a strong case for that element in the first two games against Miami. Rondo has 33 assists and just six turnovers against the Heat this season. I'll let you soak in that stew of incredible for a moment. 33 assists. Six turnovers. Even more incredible, though, is that his games could have been a lot stronger offensively. Rondo is just 5-17 from the field in this season series, for a grand total of 12 points. Rondo's clearly shown he doesn't have to score in order to be a huge advantage for the Celtics, but if he brings his brilliant playmaking and finds his mid-range or floater falling? This thing could get out of hand before half. Matched up against either Mario Chalmers or Carlos Arroyo, Rondo is able to out-class whatever the Heat want to throw at him, and he's even got the speed and ability to take Dwyane Wade or LeBron James to the cleaners. The big key for Rondo is to stay aggressive and focused. When he's zoned in, the Heat simply don't have the personnel to counter him. 

2. Baby You Got What I Need

Glen Davis has never lost a regular season game to the Miami Heat. True story. He's 9-0 all-time agains the Heat, and while some of that is an anomaly, some of it isn't, and he's been a big factor this year against the Triad. Davis is the unofficial league-leader in charges-drawn and has made some big ones against LeBron James. The Celtics' ability to close on James not at the point of attack on the perimeter, where his size and athleticism allows him to either bust the double or pass to a cutter, but at the bucket, has frustrated James time and time again throughout the years. While Davis' blubbery reverse, tilt-a-whirl mid-range and fiercely wild, yet consistent putbacks are helpful, it's this awareness on the defensive end and his willingness to sacrifice his body to an oncoming L-Train that really makes him a difference-maker in this matchup. With a shortened bench likely for this game, expect Davis' presence to be felt early and often. 

3. In Your Head, Zombie

Kevin Garnett's cute little antics can get in the heads of some, but he hasn't really whipped out the special effects in the first two meetings. His game has raged from strong but shakey in the first meeting (10 points, 7 turnovers) to strong (16 points, 13 rebounds) in the second. But he hasn't really had any key moment of conflict, which is surprising, considering how much of a target you'd expect Chris Bosh to be for Garnett's jawing and snapping. Garnett did shut down Bosh in the season opener, but he recovered for the second. You'd think that given how emotional Garnett has played lately, this game would be ripe for a fake-fight from the former MVP. At the same time, Doc Rivers, Paul Pierce, and Ray Allen need to make sure Garnett doesn't go too far. He's been pressing his luck further and further with officials lately, and they can't afford to lose him to an ejection, not with how short the bench is. Speaking of... 

4. Protect and Serve

The biggest key for this game for Boston? Don't get injured. That's the really important message. They've already won two impressive games against Miami, they're short-handed, it's February, they're in a bit of a slump, and it's an early-start game. While a nice, comfortable victory on the back of great shooting would be rewarding, and sending an even more dominant message would do the Celtics good, the goal for the Celtics now is to get to the Finals healthy. 

5. The Kobe Treatment on LeBron

The same formula that worked in the first two games should work again. Let James score all the points he wants, but make life a living hell for Dwyane Wade and the Heat shooters. Do that, and they become as one-dimensional as the Cavs were. It's only when the cylinders get going on all three members of the Triad and then the perimeter rotations start freeing up threes for the lesser guards that the Heat become a really effective unit. As long as James is being tempted into ISO situations, the Celtics can close, harass, and limit James' domination. It's fine if he gets ridiculous numbers as long as the rest of the team struggles. Worked before, it'll work again. 

Miami Heat



1. Try, Try, Try Again

It sounds simple, but if the Heat want to walk away with their first win over the Green since forming this little group of Super-Friends, they need to give more effort. Boston's defensive unit is yet again the most feared in the league and a huge reason for why the Heat's focus seemed to go in a thresher in October and November's games.  However, there was a clear lackadasical element to the Heat's body language in those games that seemed to indicate they simply weren't dialed into these games. Against the Celtics! It should have been Boston who wasn't committed to winning a meaningless regular season game, acting as if they didn't care about such games. But instead Boston brought its A-Game and the Heat seemed content to lay down and watch them take it from them. Needless to say, the same kind of intensity from Miami on Sunday will ruin any chance they have. The Celtics are tired, worn-down, injured, and know this game means nothing for them. Yet they will still bring their focus and be ready to capitalize unless the Heat give them a reason to quit. 

2. The D-Rated Superstar

Dwyane Wade has been terrible against Boston this season. He has shot 6-28 from the field for 21 points, with 9 assists and 12 turnovers. Those are "OMG" bad numbers. Wade is an elite player and it's his ability to finish at the rim that can rack up fouls for Boston and force them to bring doubles. If they're able to simply rotate like they usually do, the Heat shooters will face contested shots, which will pile up the misses. James has brought it the first two games, it's time for Wade to step up and join him. There's no reason to think they can count on the rest of the Heat to step up against the Celtics so the two best players on the team have to set the example. Wade has had a great season, but really been shut down against Boston. That can't happen Sunday or the Heat is sunk.

3. Do-Run-Run-Run, Do-Run-Run

The Celtics don't like running teams. They still usually beat them, but they have issues with them, as we've pointed out in the past. A shortened rotation due to injury is only going to exacerbate that problem. Likewise, the Heat are at their best when they're out in transition, using the talents of James, Wade, and Bosh in space. Against the Celtics this season, the Heat actually have fewer transition plays than the Celtics, (27-25, via Synergy Sports). The Celtics do a good job of getting back immediately in transition and attacking the ball to stop it. The Heat need to be insistent in pushing, and trusting that their athletes can make things happen. If they turn the ball over, so be it. But a higher pace game favors the Heat, even as the two teams are even in pace this season at 92.8

4. Desperately Seeking X

The Heat need an X-Factor. Someone to step up and put some points on the board, make a few defensive plays, create some steals, something. Udonis Haslem was that player in the first two games, but since he's out, someone will have to step up. If either Mario Chalmers, James Jones, or Eddie House can make a significant set of plays to cap off Heat runs, they may be able to get some damage done against Boston. They'll have their opportunities. The Celtics won't over-double and will run off three-pointers, but they're also unlikely to kill themselves to contest shots they're willing to live with. The Heat have to be ready to step up in those situations. It won't take a cohesive effort from all of the role players, but someone is going to need to give them something surprising. 

5. A Step in the Right Direction

The Heat can't convert anyone about their prospects in the playoffs on Sunday. Not really. But they can make a good step in that direction. The Celtics will brush off a loss by saying they'll get it done when it counts. Miami does not have that luxury, but they still need to get some level of confidence. A loss means they were beaten in three straight by Boston, with their last matchup coming in rest-up time just days before the playoffs in April. This is their best and last shot to show they can go toe to toe with Boston, even if it's an injured Celtics team. They need to get outside the hype they brought with them this season, the injuries they've dealt with, and the newness of this team. If they want to feel confident in any way, shape, or form for a possible Eastern Conference Finals matchup with the Boston Celtics, they have to start by winning in Boston Sunday.
Posted on: January 31, 2011 7:54 am
Edited on: January 31, 2011 7:54 am
 

The Shootaround 1.31.11: All Celtics / Lakers

It was one of the biggest regular season games of the year, so here's a full plate of reaction to Sunday's game between the Boston Celtics and Losshootaround Angeles Lakers. The Celtics won, 109-96, at the Staples Center in Los Angeles. Posted by Ben Golliver. 

Boston's View

  • Boston Globe: "Rondo is the NBA’s best at making the pinpoint pass at the precise moment, but he relies too much on that skill. In the second half yesterday, Rondo made matters simpler for himself and his teammates. Very rarely does Rondo play an entire half, but yesterday he played all 24 minutes and the Celtics shot a mind-boggling 69.4 percent from the floor. And of the 22 baskets converted by Celtics other than Rondo, 15 were assisted by Rondo, including six of the team’s seven 3-pointers. That means he is moving the ball, delivering passes to sweet spots. That means the Celtics are an offensive machine and Rondo is the commander. “I told Rondo in front of the team it was one of his best games of the year,’’ Rivers said. “In the fact that I thought he called an absolutely perfect game. He’s our pitcher. I thought he just called a sensational game, coming out of timeouts, making sure guys were in their spots.’’
  • CelticsBlog: "His numbers don't jump off the page and it wasn't his best game statistically, but maybe that is what made it even better.  We've come to expect this from Big Baby.  This kind of solid, all around game has become the norm, not the exception.  Sure, there are times when Doc strains his last vocal cord because of something Baby does, but those are coming less and less often. In fact, the following thought occurred to me that really made me grin:  Big Baby might be the James Posey type piece of the puzzle we've been missing since 2008." 
  • CelticsHub: "Because the Celtics offense quietly rolled over the Lakers today. Paul Pierce, who you may have heard has scored more points per game against the Lakers than any other team in his career, hit stepbacks from everywhere. He and a few other guys combined for 9-17 from 3. Rajon Rondo picked up 15 assists in the second half, part of a team total of 34. You know all this. So why isn’t anyone talking about the crappy Laker defense?"
  • WEEI.com: "Paul Pierce destroyed Ron Artest: The captain destroyed his antagonist from last year’s finals, scoring 32 points on just 18 shots and sending Artest to the bench in the fourth quarter. There was nothing Artest could do to contain Pierce, who had both his long-range and in-between game working. The Celtics were overwhelming in the second half, but Pierce kept them in position throughout the game in what might have been his best performance of the season."
  • ESPNBoston.com: Paul Pierce: "The thing is, when you win a game here now, it's not for the championship. It's a regular-season game. When we play against the Lakers, it really gets our juices going, because they are our rivals. It's a big game just knowing that we can come into this building and get a win."

Los Angeles's View

  • Los Angeles Times: "We're talking humiliation … Celtics fans chanting "Beat L.A.!" … Celtics fan Matt Damon and friends yukking it up courtside between the Lakers' bench and superfan Norm Pattiz."
  • Orange County Register: "Kobe Bryant gave his team an 'F' for its defense in Sunday's 109-96 loss to the Boston Celtics, a grade teammate Derek Fisher didn't disagree with. ... Ron Artest, usually the Lakers' defensive plug, shrugged off Bryant's failing grade, saying, 'I got F's in elementary school and I still went to college. I also got A's in elementary school and it didn't help me.'"
  • Silver Screen And Roll: "Against the Celtics at Staples this afternoon, the Lakers forced a load of Boston turnovers, went to the free-throw line early and often, shot well on threes and got a masterly performance from Kobe Bryant. It should've been enough. But it wasn't. It wasn't close to being enough."
  • Land O' Lakers: "After the 109-96 loss to the Celtics, Phil Jackson was asked if Ron Artest, who scored just three points on one-for-10 shooting while struggling to check Paul Pierce, "got lost" on the way to Staples Center. "No, he was on time," Phil replied. "(But) he got lost on the court."
  • USA Today: The Lakers shot 44.4%, made four of nine three-pointers (three by Bryant) and had 10 assists. Ten assists? That quantified the lack of ball movement that led to Bryant as the only Laker to score in a nearly five-minute span while four Celtics were scoring. Boston expanded its lead from 91-87 to 107-91. "It's always balance that makes us better," Lakers guard Derek Fisher said. "We're not going to accomplish our goals by relying on Kobe to score 30 or 40 points every game."
Posted on: January 21, 2011 12:48 pm
Edited on: August 3, 2011 2:00 pm
 

Glen Davis and the starter vs. bench element

Posted by Matt Moore

Glen Davis started while Garnett was out with his calf. And, well, er... it didn't go well, even with a 6-3 record. He was good, but he wasn't the force he's been off the bench. He shot 21-66 from mid-range and wasn't as good a rebounder as he usually is off the bench. WEEI in Boston asked him about the pressure of being a starter and Davis admitted it got in his head a bit. 
“It’s all mental,” he said. “I was kind too hard on myself when I was starting. I wanted to prove to Doc [Rivers] and prove to my teammates … The difference between that and the playoffs is I just went and played. That’s what I do when I come off the bench, I just go out and play. I put a lot of pressure on myself.  I got out of myself and tried to be something [else]. That’s now how it works. You have to be yourself. I had a couple of good games, but as far as all-around games, the way I know I can play, I didn’t bring it. Now being on the bench you get back to the same mentality.”
via Green Street » Glen Davis acknowledges starting affected him mentally .

Davis, who was Ken Berger's pick for Sixth Man of the Year, is averaging 14, 4, and 2 as a starter, but shooting just 41%. As a reserve, he averages 12.2 points, but rebounds better at 5.7 per game in fewer minutes. He also shoots 48% off the pine, a considerable improvement. He even shoots better at the line as a reserve, proving that the mental aspect has an impact here.  Davis is not a great player. He can be great, in certain games, particularly big ones, though. That's the paradox that Davis exists as.   He seems constantly on the verge of collapse, or tripping over his own feet. He drools. No, for real, he drools . But he also has a masterful reverse layup that, while seemingly averse to the laws of physics and our determination of form in any degree, also goes in a high percentage of the time. His jumper can be an absolute clunker in some games and the definitive reason for a Celtics' victory in others.  And no one takes charges as well as he does at this point. He's a worthy championship player.  But he has to come off the bench.

(HT: Reds Army)
Posted on: January 11, 2011 11:35 am
Edited on: January 11, 2011 7:15 pm
 

Report: Rasheed Wallace considers Celtics return?

Rasheed Wallace is reportedly considering a return to the Boston Celtics. Posted by Ben Golliver. rasheed-wallace

Last summer, former NBA All-Star power forward Rasheed Wallace called it quits, walking away from more than $12 million to retire after 15 seasons, following the Boston Celtics' loss to the Los Angeles Lakers in the 2010 NBA Finals.

Stephen A. Smith told the Dan Patrick Show on Tuesday, however, that Wallace may be plotting a comeback with his former team. 
Smith said that the Celtics counter the Heat's athleticism with "brute size" and Rasheed Wallace will come out of retirement to come back to the Celtics.
Smith said Wallace told him that's the plan, because he wants another shot at the Lakers in the NBA Finals.
The Celtics currently have the league-maximum 15 players under contract, so they would need to waive someone to create a roster spot for Wallace if they are seriously considering the possibility of bringing him back. Should guard Delonte West fully recover from his wrist surgery, as expected, guard Von Wafer would be expendable and relatively cheap (less than $1 million) to waive.

Do the Celtics really need Wallace? At first glance, they already seem to be maxed out on washed-up former All-Star big men clinging to the remnants of their NBA careers, thanks to Jermaine O'Neal and Shaquille O'Neal. Once Kendrick Perkins returns from his knee injury, there won't be many, if any, minutes available for Wallace, provided everyone stays healthy. 

The biggest variable here is the health of starting power forward Kevin Garnett, who recently suffered a calf strain that kept him out of action. Reserve forward Glen Davis has filled in admirably when Garnett hasn't been able to go, but an extra body at the four position might make for some added disaster preparedness should Garnett continue to be limited.

But we've also seen this same scenario play out 1,000 times: competitive former champions step away from basketball before they are mentally prepared to completely give up the game. We should know soon whether this is seriously being considered or merely another former athlete jonesing for another hit of playoff competition.

Update (7:13 PM): In less than a few hours, it appears that we have our answer. NBA Fanhouse reports that Wallace's agent, Bill Strickland, said Tuesday a return to the Celtics is not imminent for Wallace. ""I don't think that's the case -- for now anyway," Strickland told FanHouse. "He has a period of time to where he may be thinking about it, but he has not given me any indication of his intent to return. ... He's still saying that for now he's good, that he's OK where he is." CSNNE.com also quoted Celtics coach Doc Rivers saying that "there has been no discussion" about a Wallace return.
Posted on: December 30, 2010 4:30 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:56 pm
 

Garnett out 'couple of weeks' with calf strain

Boston Celtics forward Kevin Garnett reportedly suffered a right calf muscle strain and is expected out for roughly two weeks. Posted by Ben Golliver

Boston Celtics power forward Kevin Garnett dodged a bullet, as an MRI conducted Thursday after Garnett suffered a leg injury during Wednesday night's game against the Detroit Pistons reportedly revealed only a calf muscle strain in his right leg. The Celtics expect Garnett to miss "a couple of weeks." It was initially feared that Garnett re-injured his right knee during a dunk attempt, but word came out post-game that he had suffered a leg injury and not a knee injury, which could have potentially derailed Boston's title hopes. In Garnett's absence, the Celtics will turn to third-year forward Glen Davis, who is averaging career-highs in points (12.1), rebounds (5.7) and minutes (29) so far this season. The Celtics have already tapped their bench this season, using reserve guard Nate Robinson in place of starting point guard Rajon Rondo's absence due to an ankle injury. Here's the video of Garnett's injury, which occurred during the first quarter of Boston's 104-92 loss to the Pistons in Detroit. For more coverage of Garnett's injury from Wednesday night, click here.
Posted on: December 15, 2010 3:03 pm
Edited on: December 15, 2010 4:27 pm
 

Boston's trouble with running favors Knicks

You may think that New York has little shot against the mighty Celtics Wednesday night. While Boston is the best team in the league, the evidence says they may have their hands full against the Knicks

Posted by Matt Moore




You know what Boston's point differential was last year? 3.6 points per game. They won on average by a margin of 3.6. The New York Knicks lost by average of 3.8 points last year. As the Celtics are very good and the Knicks were very not, you'd imagine that the Celtics would have blown them out, as they did the year before when their average margin of victory over the Knicks was over 12 points per game. 

Except it wasn't. It was 3.75 points per game, including one three-point loss to the Knicks, and a two-point win in overtime. This against a much lesser team than the Amare-Stoudemire and Raymond Felton led squad they're visiting this evening. 

Huh. 

So while Boston is very busy talking about how this is not a rivalry and everyone's laughing off talks that the Knicks are in Boston's league as the two prepare to meet Wednesday night, it should be noted that perhaps this might be a game. Why? Because Boston doesn't like run-and-gun, that's why. 

The Celtics lost twice to Amar'e's old club in Phoenix by a combined 25 points . They split with Golden State, the fastest team in the league according to pace (number of possessions per game), winning by 14 , and then losing by 10 . Boston also split with Denver (fifth in pace), Houston (sixth in pace), and Memphis (7th in pace). (They drubbed Indiana and Minnesota the second and third fastest teams, because, well, they were terrible.)

Even account for the late season swoon by the Celtics as they coasted to the playoffs, running teams have had success against Boston. The reason that becomes evident if you watched those games is that it's an overload of what Boston tries to hard to stop. Offense. There's no balance on these clubs. They simply get up and down the floor as quickly as humanly possible. Try and slow the game down to out-maneuver them and the Celtics will always be in place. The only way through is over. You have to stampede them with speed and shooting, perplex them with threes in transition and make those old legs work. 

According to 82games.com , The Celtics have played slow-pace teams ten times, and fast paced teams eight times. They're 9-1 against slow teams, and 6-2 against fast teams. Yeah, that's still an impressive win percentage, but notice that they do have more trouble (relatively speaking) against fast teams.  New York is third in pace this year

Throw in the fact that Amar'e Stoudemire is a tougher cover for Kevin Garnett than most and you've got possible problems for Boston. Stoudemire may not be a defensive stalwart, but on offense he's not soft. He's the Anti-Bosh. He's aggressive, strong, and forceful, throwing down jams and screaming with the best of them (and Garnett is the best of them). The Knicks will get pounded inside tonight by Boston's bigs, but making Shaquille O'Neal and Glen Davis romp up and down the floor will wear on them (Shaq's a game time decision right now). Ray Allen and Rondo will like the fast pace just fine, but Paul Pierce doesn't prefer it. And in the meantime, Mike D'Antoni can ratchet up the speed without concern tonight. There's no need to try and slow  down, play good defense, and play good solid traditional basketball. That's how Boston kills you. No, instead, D'Antoni can let loose the dogs of Madison Square Garden and go Four Seconds or Less. The faster the Knicks go, the better chance they have. 

Boston's been nearly unbeatable his season, so they're still the clear favorite in this game. But while conventional wisdom says that a team with as solid of a defense as Boston should dominate a trigger-happy team like the Knicks, the evidence shows otherwise. Sometimes you've got to run if you want to get over the mountain, apparently. 

Boston meets New York in Madison Square Garden Wednesday night.
Posted on: December 6, 2010 9:35 am
 

Shootaround 12.6.10: The Brad Miller Engine

Miller drops his man, Gortat is a soccer nut, Z-BO for USA, and the worst half of basketball ever, all in today's Shootaround.  Posted by Matt Moore

Knicks blog Posting and Toasting says Danilo Galinari needs to make Landry Fields his hero: "Gallo has returned to chilling around the three-point arc and waiting for kick-outs. Even there, his conversion rate has been uncomfortably low. One way he might see more opportunities is to do what Chandler and Landry Fields have been doing and dive in diagonally or along the baseline when Stoudemire receives the ball around the free throw line. It's not like Gallo's hurting the team (5 assists, 4 boards, and decent enough defense on the perimeter), but he can do much more to help them. 2-7 isn't the kind of output you expect from someone with Gallo's scoring ability."

Zach Randolph wants to play for Team USA. I'm curious as to whether Zach realizes that the traditional block concept is nearly absent in international play. 

Marcin Gortat was a huge soccer fan and played it almost exclusively until he was 18 when he found basketball. Add him to the list of guys you'd put on a soccer team from NBA players with Steve Nash being the obvious first overall choice. 

Behold: The worst half of basketball ever.

Brad Miller dropped the man coming around his screen this weekend. Unfortunately, it was his own man

Ben Wallace is so good even at his age that bloggers know they're taking him for granted: "I don’t spend much time writing about Wallace anymore because, frankly, he’s just so consistently good that I don’t think it needs pointing out. But he, along with Hamilton and Prince, was part of the “retro” performance I alluded to in the headline. Wallace had 9 rebounds, 5 assists, 3 blocks and a steal. He was an imposing presence inside and a huge reason Cleveland’s guards shot poorly. They may have been getting penetration, but Wallace blocked or altered several shots in his 24 minutes and he continued to show that he’s a great high-post passer and someone the Pistons can comfortably take advantage of on offense."

A lockout would be devastating on so many fronts, but here's another: Kevin Garnett may retire

Our own Ben Golliver on what was memorable from last night's Blazers win over the Clippers, the violence: "This game will endure for its random acts of violence. First, and most memorably, Blazers center Joel Przybilla, who was greeted with a standing ovation upon his entry to the game, was flagrantly fouled by Brian Cook with 4 second remaining in the third quarter. The mid-air hit, which sent Przybilla flying to the ground, wound up earning Cook a Flagrant Foul 2 and an immediate ejection. It also set off a tussle under Portland's basket, with Clippers point guard Baron Davis getting into Blazers forward Nicolas Batum's chest, and Przybilla and Clippers big man Craig Smith apparently getting after it as well. All four were assessed technical fouls, and the sequence resulted with Przybilla splitting the free throws awarded him for Cook's flagrant foul, for his only point of the game."

If Brad Miller is the fuel for your offense? You may need to get a new engine.

Glen Davis, meet medicine ball
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com