Tag:Tony Parker
Posted on: January 4, 2011 11:04 pm
Edited on: January 4, 2011 11:31 pm
 

Bizarre coaching events abound

Strange coaching occurrences in New York, Miami.
Posted by Matt Moore


Two strange pieces of coaching news occurred in the NBA Tuesday night, one in Miami where two techs does not equal an ejection, and one in New York, where the fat lady didn't sing, but it was over anyway apparently.

The Heat came back from a halftime deficit, again, to beat the Bucks 101-89. Scott Skiles was whistled for your run of the mill technical foul for getting all Skiles-like on the sideline in the first half. In the second half, Skiles accidentally made contact with a player on the floor, earning him a second technical. So two techs equals an automatic ejection, right? Except the officials ruled that the second technical was not on account of "unsportsmanlike conduct" which is requisite for an ejection, and therefore Skiles got to stay. Very strange all around. Not as strange as the continuing collapse of the Bucks after such a great 2010 season, but still pretty odd.

Even more bizarre, however, was Gregg Popovich's decision to pull his starters with 3:13 remaining in the 4th down by only 10 to the Knicks. The Spurs' defense was horrific all night to be sure, allowing over 100 points in three-quarters. But the Spurs were still hanging in a very Spurs way, when suddenly, apparently Popovich had seen enough from his team and pulled Manu Ginobili, Tim Duncan, Tony Parker, and Richard Jefferson. The Spurs' offense featured Chris Quinn, Gary Neal, and Ime Udoka down the stretch. In shocking news, the Knicks hung on over that mighty lineup, 128-115 .

Some speculated that Popovich was merely resting his starters for Wednesday night's game against the Boston Celtics.  But judging from the behavior of Manu and Parker on the sideline, Pop was making a point. I guess at 29-45, Pop felt he could spare a win in order to make a point. Either way, New York managed to hold on against a playoff contender at home.

In other news, Kevin Durant missed a three-pointer to tie, the lion laid down with the lamb, and a bad moon is rising. Run for your lives!
Posted on: January 3, 2011 9:29 am
 

Shootaround: 1.3.11: A cake for a king

Posted by Royce Young
  • Can the Spurs win 70? Don't ask Gregg Popovich: “No,” Popovich told a member of the visiting media when asked if the milestone has crossed his mind. “Are you still drunk from (New Year's Eve)? Now if we lose three in a row you're going to say, ‘Is it time to panic, do you think?' ... Come on.”
  • Eddie Sefko of The Dallas Morning News: "Fate can have a crazy, cruel side. When in a nasty mood, it sends wicked twists. Caron Butler won't let karma break him, even though his knee buckled in front of his family, friends and a couple of hundred kids he bought tickets for at the Bradley Center on Saturday night. Don't weep for Butler. He wouldn't want it that way. Yes, he's gone, probably for a significant portion of the season, maybe all of it. And he becomes a free agent on July 1. The timing of this injury was horrible for the Mavericks and disastrous for Butler and his family. He was on his way to a nice season and would have been an in-demand free agent. Now? Who knows?"
  • However, the Wizards are defending better. Michael Lee of The Washington Post: "The Wizards weren't necessarily looking to turn around the season when they dealt away the former face of the franchise, Gilbert Arenas, to Orlando for Rashard Lewis on Dec. 18; the primary goal was to better clear the slate in order to rebuild around John Wall. So while the team's 2-6 record since making the trade is still unsettling, the dramatic changes on the defensive end have been startling. In the past eight games, the Wizards (8-24) have allowed just one opponent to reach triple digits after their foes scored at least 100 points in 16 of the first 24 games. The Wizards are surrendering just 91 points per game since the trade, compared with giving up 105.8 before."
Posted on: December 30, 2010 1:36 pm
Edited on: December 30, 2010 1:54 pm
 

The best in Texas right now? Has to be the Spurs

Posted by Royce Young

If you want to just do this all simple like, start with the standings. San Antonio is 27-4, which is the best record in the league. Dallas, while owners of a very nice 24-6 record, is two and a half games back of the Spurs.

So we're done here, right?

Actually, there's a lot more to it.

No doubt the Mavericks good. Really good. Forget that loss to the Raptors without Dirk. Every good team loses to someone they shouldn't. And when you're missing your very best player, you've got a good excuse too. But what separates San Antonio from Dallas right now is that the Spurs don't have a Dirk.

Wait, I know what you're thinking. That should make the Mavericks better , right? Not having a great, MVP-type player like Dirk Nowitzki is what makes San Antonio better than Dallas? Does not compute, right?

But it does. Because the Spurs are 27-4 despite not having a guy score 20 points a game. The Spurs are 27-4 with Tim Duncan averaging career-lows all over the place. The Spurs just whipped the defending champion Lakers with Duncan scoring two points and grabbing four rebounds. Tim Duncan, two points, four rebounds! Can you ever imagine the Spurs beating a good team five years ago with Duncan playing like that?

The Spurs are 27-4 because of Gary Neal. Because of Richard Jefferson's rebirth. Because of DeJuan Blair. Because of Matt Bonner. No team understands the role player concept and how each guy has value more than San Antonio. That team works completely in unison. It's like an engine on a 2001 Honda Civic. Nothing all that spectacular, nothing all that flashy. But everything works perfectly together.

Not to say the Spurs don't have some serious players though. You could make a legitimate case for Manu Ginobili as an MVP candidate. He's been the glue for San Antonio the past decade and when he's healthy like he is currently, he one the biggest X-factors in the league. Tony Parker is healthy again and playing at an All-Star caliber level. George Hill is one of the most underrated combo guards in the league.

And then there's the trump card for the Spurs. It starts with a "g," ends with two more "g's" and a frown. Rick Carlisle is a nice NBA coach, but he's not Gregg Popovich. Coach Pop is one of the few NBA coaches that you really know makes a difference with his team. Phil Jackson, Jerry Sloan, Vinny Del Negro (just kidding)... only a handful of coaches genuinely make their team better despite who's on the roster. Popovich is the leader of that pack. His team's are always ready, always prepared and always focused. Look at the Spurs' home record this season (18-2 and undefeated in December). That shows that his team is never not ready.

Popovich wasn't afraid to make a subtle switch either. San Antonio is running more than ever despite that not being the ideal game for Duncan. But it works for the other pieces and Duncan has adapted. The Spurs are averaging almost 106 points per game, which is fourth in the league. Their point differential is an impressive +8.4 compared to the Mavs' +5.6.

Those things are tangible parts to settling this debate. But it's not always about what meets the eye with the Spurs. They're the league's best and by default, Texas's best, because they march to the company line that's carried them to four titles. There's a reason they're great, even if it's not painfully obvious.
Posted on: December 28, 2010 11:25 pm
Edited on: December 29, 2010 12:11 am
 

Spurs take down Lakers; is it worry time in L.A.?

Posted by Royce Young



From the opening tip, you could feel the intensity. This might've been a regular season game on Dec. 28, but it sure seemed like something you'd see April 28.

Two titans of the postseason were playing and even though it's just one more of 82, anytime the Spurs and Lakers hook up, pleasantries don't stay in the arena very long.

Kobe Bryant and George Hill tangoed in the first half, pointing fingers in faces and saying, um, stuff to each other. Ron Artest roped Tony Parker on a fast break for a hard foul. Andrew Bynum clothes-lined Tiago Splitter on the inside. Richard Jefferson and Derek Fisher had an exchange with Fisher picking up a technical after chasing Jefferson down to bump. Hard fouls, technicals, trash talk -- this one just had that extra umph.

But just like a classic Spurs playoff win, San Antonio used stifling defense, smart offense and big plays from role players to overwhelm the Lakers in the fourth quarter, beating the defending champs 97-82 in front of a sold-out AT&T Center crowd.

And here's where we go one of two ways: Is the story how well the Spurs are playing or if the Lakers officially in crisis mode?

Let me hedge here and say both. The Spurs are playing wonderful basketball. They're undefeated at home in December, own the NBA's best record and get something from everybody that steps on the floor. Tim Duncan was just 1-7 from the floor and scored only two points. Manu Ginobili went just 3-12 from the field. So naturally, since this is the Spurs we're talking about, someone stepped up.

DeJuan Blair was a complete difference maker scoring 17 points while also grabbing 15 rebounds. Gary Neal -- who you can just picture becoming Robert Horry in the postseason -- hit two huge fourth quarter 3-points to give the Spurs some serious breathing room. George Hill was entirely terrific on Kobe in the fourth quarter, frustrating the Laker star into turnovers, bad shots and some serious barking at the officials. And of course one of the San Antonio stars played big with Tony Parker pouring in 23 including 14 in the first half.

On the Laker side, things never really looked good. The Lakers almost seemed like the team desperate for energy, frantically looking for a spark. It was almost like they were rattled. Offensively, there was never any kind of rhythm. Especially in the second half where L.A. scored only 38 points total.

The Lakers shot 35 percent for the game and the man leading the charge there was Kobe. He went just 8-27 from the field for 21 points. Pau Gasol was 3-8 for only nine points. Lamar Odom was 3-9 for nine points. Really, L.A.'s best offensive player was Matt Barnes who went 3-4 from the field.

So again, good Spurs or bad Lakers? From my perspective, it looked like a game where the Lakers self-combusted a bit as Kobe kept shooting and shooting while a very good team in San Antonio took complete advantage of it. Take this game for L.A. and put it against Sacramento and the Lakers probably win ugly. But against the Spurs? You lose by 15.

That's not something that should sit well with the Lakers. Kobe has been pretty honest with his appraisal of the team, feeling at times that they don't seem interested or committed enough. And that's what really showed against San Antonio. Kobe tried to do way too much, the offense never ran through Bynum or Gasol and defensively, there wasn't ever any kind of urgency.

This makes three straight losses for the Lakers, all coming by double-digits. And while it seems like this might be a time to scratch your head, keep in mind, this is December, even if the game felt like it was in April. It's not time to worry... yet.
Posted on: December 11, 2010 1:25 am
Edited on: August 14, 2011 9:26 pm
 

Spurs' Manu Ginobili claims to have seen UFO

San Antonio Spurs guard Manu Ginobili claims to have seen a UFO in Los Angeles, and there's video to prove it. Posted by Ben Golliver u-f-o San Antonio Spurs guard Manu Ginobili claims to have seen a UFO, and it wasn't Eva Longoria throwing one of her shoes at Tony Parker. File this one under strange-but-sort-of-true. Take it away, MySanAntonio.com.
On the night of Dec. 1, while the Spurs were in Los Angeles for a game against the Clippers, Ginobili saw what he thought was a single-engine plane in the process of crashing outside the team’s Santa Monica, Calif., hotel. He tweeted about it. He posted video. He forgot about it.
Then, Friday morning, TMZ.com picked up on the story, posting video of the moment shot by fans waiting for autographs near the Spurs bus. In it, you can see Ginobili, a Spurs’ security officer and what appears to be a strange light in the California sky.
“It was a pretty strange flight pattern,” Ginobili said. “I thought it was falling, not landing. I thought it was like a plane crash. We were expecting to see it on the news the following day, and there was nothing. That’s when we got a little curious, ‘What the hell was that?’ ”

Here's a link to the TMZ video, so you can determine exactly how insane Ginobili is for his claim.

We can also rule out Tim Duncan as the UFO, because aeronautical experts have confirmed that he hasn't been able to jump since 2004.

Dollars to doughnuts, this is all an elaborate mental test from Spurs coach Gregg Popovich.

Posted on: November 23, 2010 9:26 am
 

Game Changer 11.23.10: Spurs and ammo

Spurs and Magic have a classic, the Pacers show they're decent in dismantling a mediocre Miami team, and the Celtics take the Hawks to the shed in today's Game Changer.
Posted by Matt Moore


Each game is made up of elements which help formulate the outcome. Monday through Friday, we'll bring you the elements from the night before's games in our own specialized version of the game recaps. It's not everything that happened, but it's an insight into what lead to the results you'll see in the box scores. This is the Game Changer.  


THE BIG ONE: Spurs have one more round than Magic in shootout


San Antonio 106 Orlando 97 .

That's the final score but it doesn't even come close to descrbing A. how great this game was or B. how close this game was. It was a back and forth affair for the entire game, as neither team could shake the other one. Just as one team would seem to be pulling away, the other would respond with a flurry of offense. San Antonio would bruise their way to a lead, only to find the Magic creating turnovers, sparking the break, and dropping in three-pointers in transition. The Magic would burst their way into a lead only to find the Spurs settle down, get a bucket, then a stop, then Manu Ginobili Ginobili'ing his way with a knife to their heart. In the end, the Spurs had a few more bullets left in the gun and the Magic were unable to find an answer for Manu.

Duncan, Parker, and Ginobili combined to shoot 23 of 42, for 64 points, 13 rebounds, 21 assists, 5 steals, and 2 blocks. Guess Boston and Miami aren't the only ones with Big 3s. The efficiency with which the Spurs attacked was ruthless. In the third, Tony Parker got up to full speed and was using those wide curving pick and rolls to find Duncan, while Ginobili was using the deep wing picks for that step-back jumper he's gotten to like so much. It was a clinic in execution, and the Magic weren't far behind, with Dwight Howard forcing the issue and the Magic backcourt raining 3s. Combined the two teams hit 21 threes on 37 attempts which is just ridiculous. Matt Bonner came through with 4 big ones (4-4 from the arc) while Mikael Pietrus kept breaking up Spurs runs on his way to a 3-5 run from the perimeter.

Sharp defense, tough shots, fun basketball, a close game. This one was a beauty.

WHAT YOU MISSED: The Heat suck.


I torched the Heat for their lack of effort, cohesion, and heart.

Ken Berger spoke with Delonte West in a must-read interview about his experiences with bipolar disorder .


DEAD BEFORE THE SHIP EVEN SANK

Last night's Celtics-Hawks game was not a game. It was a mercy killing, only without the mercy. The Celtics owned the Hawks 39-13 in the first quarter, and it didn't feel that close. Boston simply could not miss. Sharp passes, smart playsets, intensity at both ends of the floor, attacking rebounds, and Nate Robinson doing his best Rondo Baron Davis when he was good impression, throw in the Hawks looking like they wanted to be anywhere but on the floor and Al Horford being physically dominated by Boston's size and you've got a recipe for Von Wafer to get a fair amount of time by the end of this one.

It was stunning, considering the Hawks swept the Celtics last year. But call it motivation over last year's flukes, or the Celtics' last fluke against the Raptors, or just the impact of a healthy Kevin Garnett, but this one was over with before the t-shirt guns had even been loaded. The Hawks continue to perplex as they look genuinely good and improved at times, and like roadkill in others.

Kevin Garnett looks not only like he's healthy, but like he's healthy like when he was 31. That's terrifying for the rest of the league.

YOUR DAILY "QUAKE" GRIFFIN NIGHTMARE DUNK:




GO-GO-GADGET LINE OF THE NIGHT:


Carmelo Anthony:
39 points (17-17 from the line), 9 rebound, 5 assists

Runner-Up:


Manu Ginobili: 25 points, 6 rebounds, 9 assists

FINAL THOUGHTS:


The Hornets are 11-2. Which is great. But the last few games have shown some of their cracks in the foundation. Relying on Jason Smith to be a significant bench contributor isn't going to get it done. Neither is hoping Emeka Okafor stays as an offensive force. The bigger concern may be that Chris Paul has started looking flat-out tired at the ends of games. Him missing the game-tying assist to David West was nothing more than one of those that happens, but in general he looked lethargic down the stretch. Some concerns for the Hornets do exist, even at 11-2.

Last night's game perfectly illustrates why Boston fans get so frustrated with their team. They look so awesome when they consistently try.

The story from Indiana-Miami was the Heat playing terribly but the Pacers deserve a world of credit for getting Danny Granger going, and Brandon Rush took it to Dwyane Wade, which, injured or not, isn't an easy thing to do. The Pacers look like a solid playoff contender.

People will tell you that the Oklahoma City-Minnesota game was closer than the final score appears. And it's true the Wolves lead down the stretch. So maybe I'm just exhibiting confirmation bias when I tell you that I never had a doubt the Thunder would win that game. The Wolves have no idea how to execute in clutch situations most times, and Michael Beasley still does a lot of Michael Beasley-type things.

Houston loses. Again.


Follow F&R on Twitter at @CBSSportsNBA and check out our RSS feed . This has been your daily edition of the Game Changer.



Posted on: November 18, 2010 11:12 am
Edited on: November 18, 2010 1:20 pm
 

Erin Barry and Tony Parker create rare Spurs mess

The twisted tale of Tony Parker, Erin Barry, and Eva Longoria creates a tantalizing love triangle story for the press... which is exactly what the Spurs try and avoid. Posted by Matt Moore

I'm going to try and do the unthinkable and try to create something that has to do with basketball or anything that's business to the rest of us out of this whole gigantic mess.

Quick catch-up:

Tony Parker and Eva Longoria were getting a divorce. Then they weren't . Then they definitely were . And now it's come out, at least in widespread rumors, that it's because Parker was sending sexual text messages to Erin Barry, wife of former Spurs teammate Brent Barry, currently an analyst for NBATV. You can go find about a billion stories about the situation on your own, like this one.

Yeah.

So this is pretty much terrible for Longoria, for Parker (even if he was doing whatever it is he's alleged to have done, we don't know anything about their relationships), for Barry, for Erin Barry, and most of all for the Barry's two sons. Yeah, they've got kids. Even though apparently Erin and Brent have been on the outs for a while . This is terrible all around and really shouldn't be being reported upon like it is... in this article. Yes, I'm using an article on the situation to tell you not to read articles on the situation. But since you're probably going to since "Erin Barry" and "Erin Barry Tony Parker" are the top two search results on Google, I thought I'd at least throw something basketball-related on this.

The Spurs aren't going to like this.

I mean, they already don't like it and don't want to talk about it . But this is the exact kind of thing the Spurs try very hard to keep out of their locker room. They do their level best to keep things nice and quiet, go about their business, not get much media coverage, and do their thing. And now this. Right after the team gave Parker a massive extension that had a lot of people raising eyebrows. This doesn't fit their M.O., doesn't fit their profile, and is going to be a distraction. A colleague told me last night's game was swamped with media in San Antonio, and it wasn't because the game was on ESPN. There's a flurry around this twisted tale, and that's, quite simply, not the Spurs' way of doing things.

The Spurs bring in veterans with good track records of being locker room guys. They most often shy away from dynamic personalities. Their star, despite being one of the funniest people in the NBA when he does decide to say something, is called a robot. Stuff like this happening on the Lakers? That's par for the course. Stuff like this happening in San Antonio? That's a breach of the Popovich Protocol. And Tony's going to hear about it. That's just the media attention.

Getting involved with a former teammate's wife? That's a whole other bag of beans. Sure, it's not a current teammate. But it's a former one. And the jump is not exactly Olympic from former to current. That kind of situation creates mistrust, which is not something you want surrounding your franchise point guard you just gave a high eight figures to. This isn't a situation that will be disastrous, the Spurs will find their way through, like they always do. But for a team that's off to such a hot start, this certainly isn't something they want to be dealing with.

And odds are, they're going to let Parker become aware of that, even as they stand by him through a trying personal time.

This concludes today's exercise in trying to make something relevant out of stuff that's really none of our business.

Posted on: November 17, 2010 9:02 pm
Edited on: August 14, 2011 8:51 pm
 

Parker, Popovich address Eva Longoria divorce

San Antonio Spurs guard Tony Parker and coach Gregg Popovich addressed Parker's divorce with Eva Longoria. Posted by Ben Golliverparker-pop There's a reason that the San Antonio Spurs have been a model NBA franchise and a model of consistent success for more than a decade: a no drama, work-first ethic that starts at the top of the organization and reaches all the way down to the last guy on the bench.  Power forward Tim Duncan and coach Gregg Popovich are the public face, providing reliable  statistical production and a level-headed calm, respectively. So it's no surprise that the Spurs are greeting the explosive tabloid headlines that surround point guard Tony Parker and a Tuesday divorce filing made by his wife, actress Eva Longoria, in typical, buttoned-down, tight-lipped fashion. Said Popovich before Wednesday's game against the Chicago Bulls, according to NBA.com.
“This is a difficult situation for everyone obviously. But Eva and Tony are two people that we love and care about, and we wish them both the best as they move through this. That’s really all I have to say about it.”
Parker didn't elaborate much past that, except to express his right to privacy.
“It’s a difficult time right now for me and Eva. Everything else is our private life.” When asked to comment on reports that Parker was involved with the wife of a former teammate, Parker said “That’s my private life. I’m having great support from my teammates and my coaches, and I’m focused 100 percent on the Spurs and trying to win basketball games.”

This is really a perfect play from Popovich and Parker, who at once acknowledge the situation and express a personal touch by using the world "difficult," but also keep focus on the bigger basketball picture. 

It's quite possible that a situation such as Parker's could cause serious chemistry issues in a number of NBA locker rooms.  The Spurs aren't any old NBA team, though, and their initial response to a potentially chaotic situation was right on the money.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com