Tag:shootaround
Posted on: December 15, 2010 10:53 am
Edited on: December 15, 2010 12:37 pm
 

Shootaround 12.15.10: Knicks-Celtics non-rivalry

Posted by Matt Moore
  • Michael Jordan was inducted into the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame last night. Well, technically he was inducted in 1993, but couldn't make it because he was busy off being Michael Jordan. So he went in at halftime of a Raptors-Bobcats game. Better than the lady who spins plates on sticks. 
  • Do Boston and New York have a rivalry ? Not really, but the thing is, every time Boston says they don't have a rivalry with someone that team beats them. Happened with Atlanta last year. They don't have a rivalry but still shouldn't say so, you know?
Posted on: December 14, 2010 9:25 am
Edited on: December 14, 2010 11:26 am
 

Shootaround 12.14.10: Respect and disrespect

Magic says the Pistons are soft, Roy Hibbert has great hands, and Noah meets the Worm, all in today's Shootaround.
Posted by Matt Moore

  • So remember when the Pacers traded for Darren Collison and he was supposed to be their point guard of the future, taking them to the next level?  Well, they've gotten to the next level, suddenly in a position to contend for a playoff spot. But Collison has been left in the dirt, and can't quite figure out why . People who weren't blown away by Collison's numbers last season questioned his poise and defensive stature, and it would appear those same elements are what is keeping T.J. Ford and A.J. Price in heavy minutes. Who would have thought the Pacers would have a point guard overflow a year ago?
  • Roy Hibbert has turned into quite the passing big man because of his time spent this summer with Bill Walton.  8 Points, 9 Seconds breaks down what's helped him improve , and his confidence has been as important as his quick decision making. There's something to be said for simply going with your instincts instead of debating yourself into a bad posssession. It's that All-Around play that has to leave you wondering... is Hibbert an All-Star this season? One guy who doesn't think so? His coach .
Posted on: December 10, 2010 9:34 am
Edited on: December 10, 2010 11:50 am
 

Shootaround 12.10.10: Shaq calls Griffin fabulous

Shaq says Blake Griffin is "fabulous,' the Heat are working towards progress, and some in New Orleans want to save their Hornets.
Posted by Matt Moore

  • Shaquille O'Neal on Blake Griffin: "He's fabulous ." Take a second and let that quote sink in. Shaq just described the most explosive rookie to enter the NBA in years in much the same way Lady Gaga likely discusses her latest dress made out of asbestos or drywall or whatever. An odd choice of words for anyone else. Par for the Shaq course.
  • Zach Lowe of SI on a specific shape the Heat have begun to implement: "The Heat have started to position James, Bosh and Wade in a triangle on the same side of the floor. They don’t do it often, but they’re trying it and are getting good results so far. Perhaps the best example happened about four minutes into the first quarter Wednesday. As Carlos Arroyo brought the ball up the left side, the three Miami stars took up residency on the opposite side — Wade in the right corner, Bosh at the right elbow and James on the right wing beyond the three-point line. A nice little $340 million obtuse triangle."
  • Rob Mahoney breaks down the accepted definition of All-Star, then asks the question, what should make an All-Star ?
  • Very quietly, the Kings are awaiting an MRI on the foot of Tyreke Evans. The whispers involve a term that rhymes with "shress shractshure." As of now he only has plantar fasciitis, which was confirmed by a foot expert this week.
Posted on: December 8, 2010 9:51 am
 

Shootaround: 12.8.10: The NBA's most underpaid

Posted by Royce Young
  • Forbes released its list of the NBA's most underpaid players. And LeBron is on top: "Yes, at $15.8 million, LeBron was the NBA's most underpaid player in 2009-'10. At almost 30 points and nine assists per game, 50.5% shooting and 39 minutes a night on the floor, James produced more wins for his club (27.2) than any player in the league. All while earning less than Zach Randolph and Pau Gasol, and about the same as slightly lesser stars Dwight Howard and James' new Miami runningmate, Dwayne Wade."
  • Ian Thompson of SI with great stuff on the Hornets situation: "Unless fans swarm to the New Orleans Arena in order to keep their franchise at home for the shortterm, the new owner of the Hornets will place New Orleans in a pool among larger available markets, including Chicago, Anaheim, San Jose and Kansas City. There hasn't been a lot of talk elsewhere about Chicago, but it is the third biggest market in North America and it has only one NBA team. New York will have two franchises when the Nets move to Brooklyn in two years, and Los Angeles has two. In suburban Chicago near O'Hare Airport, the Allstate Arena could serve as a temporary NBA home until a new arena could be built, depending on the resources of the new owner."
  • Everyone's favrorite crazy owner, Michael Heisley, doesn't get what's wrong with his Grizzlies: "I don't know what's happening. We're having a difficult time and I don't know what the reason for it is. I started the season with high hopes for the team. It's not living up to what I'd hope. I don't know what else to say. I've racked my brain trying to figure it out."
  • Jimmy Smith of The Times-Picayune: "When the NBA stepped in to purchase the New Orleans Hornets on Monday, the league was faced with the situation of an owner who was heavily in debt and borrowing to pay the team’s on-going operations, according to an audit of the franchise’s finances posted on the website Deadspin.com Tuesday evening. While the team actually made an operating profit in 2009, the problem for owner George Shinn was the team’s long-term debt. At the end of 2009 - the second of the two years which the audit covers - the Hornets’ long-term debt was $111 million. And they had to pay $8.9 million in interest on it. That wiped out an operating profit of $5.8 million."
  • Steve Kelley of the Seattle Times: "We won't forgive Stern for what he did. But there is no satisfaction in continuing to hate him. It's time to forget. Who knows if Steve Ballmer wants to own an NBA team? Or if he can put together the same well-intentioned would-be-saviors who introduced a viable 11th-hour plan to keep the Sonics before they left for Oklahoma City? Ballmer could be a hero for Seattle. He could add a touch of class for a league that could use a little. The New Orleans Hornets are for sale. Is Ballmer in a buying mood?"
Posted on: December 7, 2010 9:56 am
Edited on: December 7, 2010 10:07 am
 

Shootaround 12.7.10: Where Stern went wrong

Posted by Royce Young
  • Darren Rovell of CNBC on why the NBA messed up purchasing the Hornets: "The last point is the public relations disaster that this could create. If George Shinn and Gary Chouest couldn’t make it in New Orleans, fine. They’d say that and leave. Now it’s the NBA’s business to put this team in the best position it can and if they leave New Orleans it will be the league’s fault, not Shinn or Chouest’s fault, that they left."
  • An editorial from The Times-Picayune: "Mr. Stern and the league played an important role in the Hornets' return to New Orleans post-Katrina. The league also brought the NBA All-Star game to New Orleans in 2008, and metro residents are thankful for that support. The league is appointing Jac Sperling, a native New Orleanian and vice-chairman of the NHL's Minnesota Wild, to run the Hornets. But the new ownership raises questions as to the team's future, especially as the current lease expires in 2014.
  • Magic Johnson should buy the Hornets?
  • At The Hive on why the Hornets aren't the Expos: "The Hornets, however, are a viable, competitive, and valuable franchise. Their only problem is that George Shinn wanted out of the organization quickly, and that wasn't able to be done quickly enough for his desire and still keep the franchise in New Orleans. It's not a team, like the Expos, that were deemed to be of negative value to the league."
  • Noam Schiller of Both Teams Played Hard on MIP candidates: "Russell Westbrook: And who stands above Horford for 2nd in the league in PER? I’ll give you a hint: he plays for the Thunder and he isn’t Kevin Durant. Westbrook has taken his scoring to the next level by using his speed and athleticism to constantly get to the rim, where he either converts his shots at a career high 55.2%, or draw fouls. Russ is getting to the line 9.6 times a night (good for 4th in the league) and making his freebies at a career high 87% clip, combining with last year’s prominent leap-maker Kevin Durant to create the league’s most deadly foul drawing team. If he doesn’t make the all-star team this year, something is wrong with the universe."
Posted on: December 6, 2010 9:35 am
 

Shootaround 12.6.10: The Brad Miller Engine

Miller drops his man, Gortat is a soccer nut, Z-BO for USA, and the worst half of basketball ever, all in today's Shootaround.  Posted by Matt Moore

Knicks blog Posting and Toasting says Danilo Galinari needs to make Landry Fields his hero: "Gallo has returned to chilling around the three-point arc and waiting for kick-outs. Even there, his conversion rate has been uncomfortably low. One way he might see more opportunities is to do what Chandler and Landry Fields have been doing and dive in diagonally or along the baseline when Stoudemire receives the ball around the free throw line. It's not like Gallo's hurting the team (5 assists, 4 boards, and decent enough defense on the perimeter), but he can do much more to help them. 2-7 isn't the kind of output you expect from someone with Gallo's scoring ability."

Zach Randolph wants to play for Team USA. I'm curious as to whether Zach realizes that the traditional block concept is nearly absent in international play. 

Marcin Gortat was a huge soccer fan and played it almost exclusively until he was 18 when he found basketball. Add him to the list of guys you'd put on a soccer team from NBA players with Steve Nash being the obvious first overall choice. 

Behold: The worst half of basketball ever.

Brad Miller dropped the man coming around his screen this weekend. Unfortunately, it was his own man

Ben Wallace is so good even at his age that bloggers know they're taking him for granted: "I don’t spend much time writing about Wallace anymore because, frankly, he’s just so consistently good that I don’t think it needs pointing out. But he, along with Hamilton and Prince, was part of the “retro” performance I alluded to in the headline. Wallace had 9 rebounds, 5 assists, 3 blocks and a steal. He was an imposing presence inside and a huge reason Cleveland’s guards shot poorly. They may have been getting penetration, but Wallace blocked or altered several shots in his 24 minutes and he continued to show that he’s a great high-post passer and someone the Pistons can comfortably take advantage of on offense."

A lockout would be devastating on so many fronts, but here's another: Kevin Garnett may retire

Our own Ben Golliver on what was memorable from last night's Blazers win over the Clippers, the violence: "This game will endure for its random acts of violence. First, and most memorably, Blazers center Joel Przybilla, who was greeted with a standing ovation upon his entry to the game, was flagrantly fouled by Brian Cook with 4 second remaining in the third quarter. The mid-air hit, which sent Przybilla flying to the ground, wound up earning Cook a Flagrant Foul 2 and an immediate ejection. It also set off a tussle under Portland's basket, with Clippers point guard Baron Davis getting into Blazers forward Nicolas Batum's chest, and Przybilla and Clippers big man Craig Smith apparently getting after it as well. All four were assessed technical fouls, and the sequence resulted with Przybilla splitting the free throws awarded him for Cook's flagrant foul, for his only point of the game."

If Brad Miller is the fuel for your offense? You may need to get a new engine.

Glen Davis, meet medicine ball
Posted on: December 3, 2010 10:02 am
 

Shootaround 12.3.10: LeBron did something

Posted by Royce Young
  • John Krolik of Cavs The Blog: "These were the Heat we all feared. When the Heat play like this, no team can beat them, especially if they have the kind of limited talent the Cavs do. This was also the first night the Heat really played like this, and they still have to prove themselves with another win over a plus – .500 team. This was the night Miami said “enough with the excuses, we are too good to do anything other than embarrass teams like this,” and that started with LeBron."
  • Israel Gutierrez of The Miami Herald: "The Heat played with a purpose. A playoff-like purpose. This historic return home for one of the NBA's greatest might have become his biggest victory to date. He came out of this not only with the reassurance that he made the right choice, but he left more confident about it than ever. He came out of it knowing that Wade isn't a player with whom he's competing for touches, but possibly the best teammate he could have in moments like this. He came out of it knowing that, just days after he reportedly turned on his head coach, the Heat would still come together to support him. ... Now LeBron can move on."
  • Terry Pluto of The Plain Dealer: "Northeast Ohio can be proud of its fans, but the Cavs were horrible. After jumping to a 17-12 lead, they were overwhelmed by James and the Heat. By the end of the first quarter, they were behind, 31-23. At the half, it was 59-40. It just kept getting worse. As the Cavs crumbled, the Heat united around James, who had an MVP-type game with 38 points, five rebounds and eight assists. Who knows if Miami (12-8) uses this game -- its third victory in a row -- to help turn its season around? Frankly, who in Northeast Ohio cares? The Cavaliers were chastised by coach Byron Scott for a lazy approach. During the game as he was pouring in the points, James walked over to the bench a few times and chatted with some of his former teammates. The Cavaliers should be embarrassed by their lack of effort. But not the fans. They were at their best when so many people expected the worst."
Posted on: December 2, 2010 10:19 am
Edited on: December 2, 2010 11:28 am
 

Shootaround 12.2.10: Judgment Day

Rondo has a nickname, Sanders has a bunch of blocks, and oh, yeah, some guy comes back to Ohio today, all in today's Shootaround. Posted by Matt Moore
  • At CavsBlog, John Krolik welcomes back the Chosen One to the city he abandoned: "Welcome back to the Q. Last time you were here, you went 3-14 in a 32-point loss. Maybe the booing will motivate you to do better this time. I am fairly confident that you will not always be hated the way you are now. You will probably be loved someday. But you will never be loved with the kind of passion that Cleveland hates you with now. I am fairly confident of this. You may as well embrace that, because it’s far too late to try and change it."
  • A different take which I was curious if it would exist today: Terry Pluto for Cleveland.com feels more sadness than anger at the return of LeBron:"But one night on ESPN changed all that. It's not tragic. It's not the end of Northeast Ohio. It's not something that dramatically impacts the lives of most people here. It's just sad . . . and James should have known better."
  • Fear The Swords is swelling with pride for a place so often draped in disappointment and failure as a day of judgment for their city arrives. 
 
 
 
 
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