Tag:Chicago Bulls
Posted on: January 11, 2012 5:13 pm
Edited on: January 11, 2012 7:47 pm
 

Rose wearing walking boot, out against Wizards

Posted by Royce Young

UPDATE: It's confirmed, Rose is out tonight.

The Bulls are banged up at point guard, but it was really no biggie as long as Derrick Rose was fine. Well, he might not be.

According to the Chicago Tribune, Rose is wearing a walking boot on his left foot because of turf toe and is "likely out" against the Wizards Wednesday. Why is Rose in a walking boot? He's dealing with a little turf toe and it worsened last night.

The Bulls signed Mike James out of the D-League today according to ESPN.com, to help fill in for C.J. Watson who has been injured and now presumably to help out with Rose likely being out.

John Lucas will likely start for the Bulls if Rose doesn't play with new guy James backing him up, assuming he joins the team right away.
Posted on: January 11, 2012 12:16 am
Edited on: January 11, 2012 1:46 am
 

Report Card 1.10.12: Washington Wizards get a W



By Matt Moore

Your nightly report card gives you a big picture look at what happened each night in the NBA. Grades are granted based on team or individual performances, and are graded on a curve for each element. Leave your own grades in the comments. 

Washington Wizards


A win! A real win! The Nets (0-18 start) is safe! Crack the champagne! Or Shasta! Or something. The Wizards were desperate, the Raptors were lethargic, the Wizards' offense wasn't gangbusters but their defense was stout. The Raptors cut the lead to 8 at one point, and then the Wizards just hit them in the mouth. Trevor Booker was tough inside, Chris Singleton was productive, John Wall had an efficient game passing (and still can't shoot). It wasn't a great game. But a win to get them off the snide, their first of the season? That's an A.


Chicago Bulls/Minnesota Timberwolves

Since we grade on a curve, the Bulls weren't flawless on defense, and the Wolves game them a good scare. But they executed and executed and answered everything the Wolves tried to do in order to steal momentum. Rose came back from an ankle injury and still closed out the game in style, including a dagger right in the eye of Ricky Rubio to put the fire out.

But the Wolves were right there. And where so many teams would wilt and die under the Bulls' pressure, the Wolves stayed in there. What's more, they controlled the turnover battle and produced on offense. Defense was their problem (*cough* Kevin Love *cough*) but they still got some big performances from their stars (*cough* Kevin Love *cough*).

Portland Trail Blazers

The Clippers hung in this one, and that says something about where both teams are at. But the Blazers got what they needed, particularly from Gerald Wallace and Raymond Felton. Felton took over with a whirling dervish of layups and stripped Blake Griffin down the stretch. The Blazers continue to pressure teams into mistakes. It wasn't a flawless performance by any means, but it is a revenge get from the game they let slip in Staples. Blazers keep rolling. 

Houston Rockets


They beat the Bobcats while shooting 39 percent from the field, 35 percent from the arc, and 75 percent from the line. They turned it over 22 times and the Bobcats were missing two starters. So no, I am not impressed. One thing to watch, though. Jordan Hill has become a legitimate center in this league. After being cast off by the Knicks, he's one of the league leaders in rebound percentage and is playing efficiently at both ends. A good gamble that paid off for Houston. 




Memphis Grizzlies down the stretch


The Grizzlies were in this. In all honesty, they should get a B for their work against an exceptional OKC team. But down the stretch, in a tight game, the continuously made stupid fouls against Russell Westbrook who they have never been able to contain when he's in gear. Rudy Gay repeatedly took threes when they needed him creating inside, then turned the ball over in one-possession game. The Grizzlies' final meaningful possession was a Westbrook block of a Conley layup. Someone has to step up and make plays for this team if they're ever going to get out of their hole.

Toronto Raptors


Lost to the Wizards. Au-to-mat-ic.





LeBron James and the Heat in the clutch



Oh, here's a new one! 

The Heat did what they are most known for, completely self-destructing in the fourth quarter. LeBron James did not attempt a field goal in the fourth quarter. In overtime he missed several key shots and was blocked. He took a poor shot to go for the tie instead of working inside and all that post work we talked about? Gone. 

The Heat have been incredible this season, and that's not media fawning, that's just how good their play has been. But Tuesday night was a reminder that that hideous version of themselves that cost their team a championship still exists. They freeze, they lock up, and they let the whole world rain down on their heads. They utterly failed against a team they had down 17 Tuesday night. 


Gold Stars: Kobe Bryant (48 points on 18/31 shooting); Gerald Wallace (20-4-4 and so many huge plays there are too many to count plus a dagger three); David Lee, Dorrell Wright, Raymond Felton, Al Jefferson (30 and 12), Russell Westbrook
Posted on: January 10, 2012 7:36 pm
Edited on: January 10, 2012 9:23 pm
 

High school coach: I never cut Michael Jordan

Posted by Ben Gollivermj-unc

The two biggest pieces of lore in modern basketball history are Wilt Chamberlain's supposed conquest of 10,000 women and Michael Jordan supposedly getting cut from his high school team. It would take a dream team of forensic scientists plus a time machine to prove or disprove Chamberlain's performance, but we know the truth about Jordan's legendary high school struggles.

Jordan did not make the Laney (N.C.) High School varsity team as a sophomore. Instead, he played for the J.V. team that year before ascending to stardom as an upperclassmen.  

In a Sports Illustrated profile, Clifton (Pop) Herring, Jordan's high school coach, makes it clear that Jordan was "placed" rather than "cut."
To an outsider watching Pop Herring's basketball tryout in November 1978, it would not have been obvious that the gym at Laney High in Wilmington, N.C., held a player destined to become the greatest in the universe. He was still Mike Jordan then, not Michael Jordan, just another sophomore guard among 50 eager boys competing for 15 spots on the varsity and 15 more on the junior varsity. There was no doubt that Mike Jordan could handle the ball, but his shooting was merely good and his defense mediocre. Mike Jordan was seven or eight inches shorter than Michael Jordan would be, only 5'10" at age 15, and at least one assistant coach had never heard of him before that day. If Jordan distinguished himself at all during the tryout, it was through his supreme effort. He was first in line for the conditioning drills, and he ran them as hard as anyone, and when they were over he wanted to run some more.
...

But the Laney Bucs did have one major weakness, and that was size. They didn't have a returning player taller than 6'3".

...

"They criticized me for cutting Michael Jordan," he says. "Now, when, if you ever attempt to play any type of athletics, remember this small new hint of advice. New conversation of advice. If—when I was comin' up playin' ball, when you get cut, you are cut predominantly. Whatever is on each side. Then you do not even play either level, jayvee or varsity. Michael—well, Mike—Jordan was placed on the junior varsity level. Uh-huh? He was placed on the junior varsity level. He wasn't cut away from the game that made him."

It might seem like Herring is parsing words or splitting hairs, but placing Jordan on the J.V. team instead of cutting him outright makes all the difference in the world for his reputation. Given the team's roster needs, Jordan's pre-spurt size and pre-formed skillset, and the vast competition for the spot, placing Jordan on the junior varsity for seasoning makes some sense in context, especially to those in the world of basketball who realize that development does not occur on a straight-line trajectory. Let's face it: Whenever the words "Michael Jordan was cut" come up, the implication is that only a blind fool wouldn't be able to recognize Jordan's talent and eventual greatness. Clarifying to the world that this was a program placement allows Herring the context to affirm his credibility, something that is called into question -- directly or indirectly --  any time there's a reference to Jordan's high school hiccup.  

These details were far less important -- completely meaningless, really -- to Jordan. Junior varsity wasn't the highest level so therefore it wasn't good enough. Simple as that. Talent evaluators sized up Jordan and determined he wasn't the pick of the litter and that conclusion wouldn't do. Simple as that. Had Jordan made the top team, he surely would have recalibrated his worldview to adjust the chip on his shoulder. Perhaps he wouldn't have started or he wouldn't have immediately been the go-to scoring option in the clutch. That wouldn't have been good enough for the Jordan we've come to know over the last 30+ years, so the cycle would have continued from there.

This is a rare case where learning the truth behind a legend doesn't undercut its meaning at all. Rather, we get a clarified and more nuanced portrait of Jordan the competitor. In the original version -- where everyone thought Jordan was actually cut from basketball completely -- the Hall of Famer was a hero because he dedicated himself to improving his game so that a coach's decision would never stand between him and basketball. In the more accurate version, Jordan is the protagonist who never settled for anything short of the absolute best, using a roster decision as the fuel to cast himself into a lifelong fantasy battle against a world of perceived doubters who were out to tear him down. The first version lacks the ruthlessness which has come to define Jordan. The second version keeps that take-no-prisoners, forget-no-slights approach front-and-center.
Posted on: January 3, 2012 11:25 pm
Edited on: January 4, 2012 1:02 am
 

Report Card:The Bulls won ugly



By Matt Moore
 and Ben Golliver

A+ Andrew Bynum

The performance of Tuesday night came from Lakers forward Andrew Bynum, who continues the tear he's been on since returning from a 4-game suspension. Bynum notched 21 points, 22 rebounds and 3 blocks in a 108-99 victory over the Houston Rockets and finished with a game-high +17. Bynum again did work on both ends -- six offensive rebounds -- and was a monster around the hoop. Houston's bigs offered little resistance. The game marked the first 20/20 night of Bynum's career.

A Portland Trail Blazers

The Blazers flew by the Thunder in the second half. Their team defense on Kevin Durant was crucial, particularly in keeping him off the line. The Thunder live at the stripe and the Blazers managed to force Durant into an inefficient night while not letting him get to the line. Throw in their usual great team defense and a huge win on the road.

A LaMarcus Aldridge

Aldridge battled Kendrick Perkins all night. And he worked him over. 30 points and 8 rebounds for Aldridge, who repeatedly torched him in the post and face-up. Perkins got under his skin, as you can see.



But Aldridge won the game, and repeatedly bodied Perkins out of the way to score at the bucket. Perkins only managed to get to LMA after he'd done his damage.

B Memphis Grizzlies

The Grizzlies needed to get a win to stop their bleeding. Say hello to the Kings. It's a weak opponent but the Grizzlies needed a dominant performance and they got it from Rudy Gay with 23 points and 8 rebounds on 10-16 shooting. Without Zach Randolph but with Mike Conley returning, maybe the Grizzles can right the ship as the schedule evens out.

C Bismack Biyombo

Biyombo is pretty much what we thought he'd be. He makes a huge impact with his length but also gets lost on rotations and blows several possessions. In the Bobcats' loss to the Cavs you were impressed with the way he could impact plays like a giant tarantula covering the rim, but he also wound up -14 on the night.

D Sacramento Kings

Will someone get some water? Because Paul Westphal's chair has caught fire.

F Chicago Bulls' first-half offense

The Bulls scored 24 points... in a half. They had an efficiency rating of 54 in the first half against Atlanta, with a standard efficiency mark at any time during the game between 90 (poor) and 110 (vey good). So 54 is the lowest I've ever seen. They were beyond horrific. Only to be topped by...

F Atlanta Hawks' fourth-quarter execution

The Hawks were outscored 34-18 in the final frame, and did everything wrong. Took mid-range jumpers. Fouled Luol Deng 100 times. Didn't help enough on Derrick Rose, especially on the game winning layup. And the free throws. The Hawks clanged free throw after free throw when they had a chance to win, particularly Jeff Teague with seven seconds left which would have made it a three-point game. The Bulls did enough to get the win, but you have to say the Hawks lost this game more than the Bulls won it.
Posted on: January 3, 2012 2:37 pm
 

NBA Power Rankings: Breakdown, Takedown Vol. 3

Posted by Royce Young and Ben Golliver

durant-pull-up

The 2011-2012 NBA season has officially entered 2012. With that comes the third installment of CBSSports.com's NBA Power Rankings by Eye On Basketball's Matt Moore.

What did he get right? What did he get wrong? We're here to break it down and take it down.

1. Too High: Oklahoma City Thunder at No. 1. This week's Power Rankings made it through exactly zero spots before being completely wrong. Both Oklahoma City and Miami have one loss. OKC's loss is to the four-loss Dallas Mavericks, ranked No. 19 this week (No. 29 last week, don't think we forgot about that). Miami's loss was to one-loss Atlanta, ranked No. 4 this week. Sure, Miami lost to the Hawks at home, but they also did exactly what OKC couldn't: beat Dallas in Dallas, thumping the Mavericks on Christmas Day. OKC is dealing with reports of teammate-on-teammate verbal violence while Miami is humming along like a group of really, really athletic Boy Scouts. This one is indefensible. -- BG

2. Too Low: Miami Heat at No. 2. Let's be clear: the Heat are not infallible. A Dwyane Wade foot injury and an awful 4-for-17 shooting night against the Hawks provide some consternation. But the body of work is absolutely there. The Heat are No. 4 in offensive efficiency and No. 9 in defensive efficiency, a ranking sure to rise. As it stands, both rankings are better than the Thunder. Pick an advanced statistic -- rebounding rate, true shooting percentage, turnover percentage and assist rate -- and Miami is better than Oklahoma City. South Florida, stand up. For the first time in years I have your back. -- BG

3. Most Overrated: Atlanta Hawks at No. 4. They beat the Heat. Good for them. No seriously, good for them. But are the Hawks really a top four team? The same Hawks team that did virtually nothing except add Tracy McGrady and lose Jamal Crawford in the offseason. Let's keep our heads here on the Hawks. They're the same old Hawks that are just good enough to keep our attention but not quite good enough to actually be in the conversation. -- RY

4. Most Overlooked: Chicago Bulls at No. 3. The lively debate over the No. 1 spot didn't include Chicago, and it probably should have. It's hard to be overlooked at No. 3 but I'd argue that's the case. Derrrick Rose had about as good of a game as you can have last Friday against Chris Paul and the Los Angeles Clippers, and it barely made waves, lost in the New Year's celebration. Chicago has been winning ugly and they didn't drop jaws throughout their Christmas Day victory over the Los Angeles Lakers in the same manner that Miami and Oklahoma City did. They're still smarting from that first impression a bit. With a 3-1 West coast road trip, they had the toughest schedule of the top-3 teams and they handled it in typically professional style. Look for Chicago to remain at No. 3 or higher for the foreseeable future. -- BG

5. Sure Thing: Washington Wizards at No. 30. Holy crap, they are so bad. Monday's game in Boston was finally somewhat competitive, but it's simple: John Wall has to be excellent if the Wizards are going to compete. Right now, he's playing average basketball. With Nick Young, JaVale McGee, Andray Blatche and whoever else running with Wall, that roster isn't good enough to win unless Wall takes them to a higher level. They are the NBA's worst and there isn't a doubt about it. -- RY

6. Wild Card: San Antonio Spurs at No. 10. The Spurs came out of the gates working people over like their old selves. They looked to be well on their way to another year of everyone doubting them while they just owned the West. Except after a dominant 2-0 start, the Spurs have dropped games to Houston and the Wolves, while not being all that competitive in either games. Plus, Manu Ginobili broke his hands. The Spurs could be a top five team, but they could also fall way past that. -- RY
Posted on: January 3, 2012 2:34 pm
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Posted on: December 30, 2011 5:16 pm
Edited on: December 30, 2011 5:21 pm
 

Derrick Rose to sign $250 million adidas deal?

Posted by Ben Golliverderrick-rose-chicago

Derrick Rose, the NBA's reigning MVP, reportedly could be in line for a quarter billion dollar shoe deal. Yes, billion with a "B".

ESPN.com reports that the Chicago Bulls point guard could make as much as $250 million in endorsement money from athletic apparel manufacturer adidas.

One industry source insisted to ESPN.com this week that Rose's new shoe deal with adidas will easily crack nine figures and could legitimately approach the $250 million range -- as in $25 million annually over a 10-year span -- in what is known in the shoe game as a "lifetime" deal.

How can the reigning MVP possibly command those kind of dollars as a shoe endorser? Here's how: Rose, as it was explained to me, is adidas' only counter to Kobe Bryant in China. I'm told Rose already outsells LeBron James there.

Shoe endorsement deal specifics are notoriously difficult to pin down and verify. But, at $10 million per year or $25 million per year, Rose would be in a salary range rarely, if ever, broached by professional basketball players.

For comparison's sake, Miami Heat All-Star forward LeBron James signed a 7-year, $93 million shoe deal in May 2003, according to CNBC.com. He re-upped with Nike in 2010 but terms of that deal were not disclosed. Heat All-Star guard Dwyane Wade reportedly made roughly $10 million per year in shoe endorsement money in a 2005 deal, according to BusinessWeek.com. Former Philadelphia 76ers guard Allen Iverson's lifetime contract with Reebok was reportedly worth $50 million over 10 years, according to AskMen.com.

Rose, 23, signed a 5-year, $94 million extension with the Bulls earlier this month. 

Rose recently starred in an adidas spot where he dodged Spanish bullfighters to slam dunk a basketball in a bull ring.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com