Tag:Golden State Warriors
Posted on: July 17, 2011 1:04 pm
Edited on: July 18, 2011 12:04 am
 

Heat-Mavs rematch possible for Christmas Day

The Dallas Mavericks and Miami Heat will reportedly have a rematch of the 2011 NBA Finals on Christmas. Posted by Ben Golliver.

lebron-dirk-big

Assuming NBA commissioner David Stern doesn't turn into the Grinch who stole Christmas, the NBA reportedly has firmed up at least one match-up for its annual winter showcase. The Miami Herald reports that there will be a rematch of the 2011 NBA Finals on Christmas Day.
According to a league official, one of the two Heat-Mavericks games is being planned for Christmas in Dallas, likely at 2:30 p.m. The schedule will be announced shortly, though labor problems could shorten the season.
Scheduling a rematch of one of the most-watched and enjoyed NBA Finals in recent memory on Christmas is a no-brainer. It's a great reward for the winner to play host during one of the league's most-watched days of hoops.

Last year's slate of five games looked like this.
Without a doubt, seven of those 10 teams (including the Heat) need to play on Christmas again in 2011 from a marketing standpoint. You can pencil in the Bulls (Eastern Conference Finals, Derrick Rose), Knicks (Amar'e Stoudemire, Carmelo Anthony, Madison Square Garden), Lakers (Kobe Bryant, Staples Center), Thunder (Western Conference Finals, Kevin Durant, Russell Westbrook), Magic (Dwight Howard) and Celtics (The Big 3).

If you add the Mavericks into the mix, that leaves only two open spots. One of those two spots surely needs to go to Blake Griffin and the Los Angeles Clippers. History has dictated that the late game takes place in the Pacific time zone, meaning the Clippers could play either the Trail Blazers, Warriors or Sacramento Kings. Given their uptempo style and new coach Mark Jackson, something makes me think the Warriors will get the nod.

Here's how I would lay out the Christmas Day schedule:
  • Orlando Magic at New York Knicks: League's best big man, with free aency rumors swirling, showcased in the NBA's biggest market and facing two All-Stars that recently made it home.
  • Boston Celtics at Chicago Bulls: Balanced Eastern Conference powers who both excel on defense and have a playoff history to boot.
  • Miami Heat at Dallas Mavericks: The rematch.
  • Oklahoma City Thunder at Los Angeles Lakers: An obvious new guard vs. old guard match-up in the Western Conference.
  • Los Angeles Clippers at Golden State Warriors: Mama, there goes that Blake Griffin highlight package.
All of this, of course, is dependent upon a labor agreement being reached without a prolonged work stoppage.
Posted on: July 12, 2011 7:51 pm
Edited on: July 12, 2011 8:24 pm
 

What teams risk in a lockout: Pacific Division

Posted by Matt Moore

Talk of losing an entire NBA season is a bit ridiculous. But it's a possibility. And with all this hardline talk going on, it seems like neither the players nor the owners are wanting to budge. There's incentive for teams to get a deal done and not just for the money, but because a year without basketball and, more importantly, basketball operations, could greatly affect every NBA franchise.

Earlier this week, we took a look at the Southeast Division, the Atlantic Division, the Central DivisionSouthwest Division, and Northwest Division.  We finish our series with the Pacific Division.

Los Angeles Lakers

The quick answer here is: it depends. A lost season would remove what could be the final year of this Laker core together. Kobe Bryant will be 34 in the summer of 2012. Bryant will be able to play until he's 40 thanks to conditioning. But his body is already showing significant wear and tear at age 32. Losing another year of Bryant, along with 30+ players Lamar Odom and Pau Gasol guarantees the end of meaningful contention, most likely. That doesn't mean it's not possible. It just becomes more difficult.

But on the other hand, if the team's already moving toward the future, making the requisite good faith effort to keep this core together but planning around Andrew Bynum (as rumors have suggested), then the lockout doesn't affect things much. The question is whether the team believes the run is over. It probably doesn't, but their actions over the last few months haven't exactly spelled confidence. They haven't indicated an "abandon ship" attitude either. Far from it. But there's enough there for it to be confusing.

Some other good news from a lockout for L.A.? Matt Barnes comes off the books, Lamar Odom enters a non-guaranteed year, and Derek Fisher, Luke Walton and Steve Blake enter contract years, so their contracts finally become easily movable. The bad news? Bynum enters a contract year without a fully healthy season in four years. Good times.

Phoenix Suns

The lockout would probably be a good thing for Robert Sarver's organization, based simply on the fact that the Suns' salaries will drop by close to $40 million from 2011-2012 to 2012-2013. (Note: Vince Carter and his bought-out contract make up $18 million of that, so it's kind of a fake $40 million. But still!) They lose the last year of Steve Nash's contract, which is a bummer. But considering most of us think Nash deserves to be freed from a sinking ship like the Suns, it's not that terrible. Plus the Suns manage to clear off Mickael Pietrus and Aaron Brooks (assuming they decline to match him in free agency, which they may not, but it's a nice thought) and Hakim Warrick and Robin Lopez could both enter contract years depending on if the Suns elect to pick up or not pick up various options.

That would leave just Jared Dudley, Channing Frye and Josh Childress as their only long-term contracts. And don't get me wrong, those contracts are horrible. But if the Suns want to rebuild (and they need to rebuild), they'll be in a great position to do so. The Suns are unlikely to improve next season, so there's no big risk in losing next season. Imagine paying no salary for a year plus the money Sarver will make when he sells his 2012 first-rounder! (A joke, and a bad one. Sorry, Suns fans.)

Sarver may actually sabotage the negotiations.

Golden State Warriors

Lacob and Guber spent a pretty penny on this franchise. So you can imagine they'd want to get started early. On the other hand, after spending that much, they need the profit-guaranteeing, value-increasing measures the lockout is geared toward. They're likely to commit to a full-season lockout, especially since it chops off $20 million they'd have to pay David Lee and Andris Biedrins for what will naturally be a losing season.

And hey, it's taken them two years to figure out what to do with Monta Ellis. They could use another twelve months.

But the Warriors still have a lot to fix, and they need to get on it. Time's a wastin'.

L.A. Clippers

The Clippers would see their payroll drop by $20 million dollars if they lost the entire 2011-2012 season. They've already activated Blake Griffin's 2012 option, naturally. Mo Williams would be entering a contract year, taking the sting out of the money they paid to get rid of Baron Davis (now about that draft pick...). Eric Gordon would have to get paid, but the fact remains that the Clippers would only have six players on roster, and two of them would be entering expiring deals.

Thanks to their market, the Clippers make a profit no matter what happens, so this wouldn't harm them tremendously. But for a franchise with so much promise, they need to get started. Because otherwise Griffin could enter restricted free agency in 2014 (if restricted free agency exists) with only one year to convince Griffin to work with them on a reasonable extension. Fun stuff.

Sacramento Kings

It's another year for the Maloofs to figure out how to get out of Sacramento. It's a year to take out the full-blown momentum of the fan uprising. But it's also a year that loses all that young talent, and a small-market team like Sacramento can't really survive losing an entire year of revenue. The Maloofs may have to fake a death to cover debts otherwise.

This could get awkward.



Posted on: July 6, 2011 7:01 pm
Edited on: July 6, 2011 7:15 pm
 

NBA locking out Stephen Curry's wedding?

Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry says that the NBA might prevent team officials from attending his wedding. Posted by Ben Golliver. stephen-curry

The NBA's lockout is a literal term: players are physically locked out from team facilities and cannot have direct contact with team officials. The league has scrubbed its website and threatened to fine teams that contact players, even through social networking sites.

Apparently, weddings are off-limits too, at least without official clearance from the league office.

Yahoo! Sports reports that Warriors guard Stephen Curry is about to get hitched and isn't sure whether Golden State employees will be able to attend.
Curry also has some other plans for July: He and his fiancèe, Ayesha Alexander, are getting married in Charlotte at the end of the month. He expects eight Warriors teammates, other NBA players like Rudy Gay, Ronny Turiaf and Corey Maggette and members of former Warriors coach Keith Smart’s staff to attend. He’s still waiting to see if Warriors’ front office officials and Bobcats assistant coach Stephen Silas, a former Golden State assistant, can get cleared by the NBA to go. Miami Heat officials were recently given permission to attend Chris Bosh’s wedding.

“They all sent their regards and petitioned the league to come to the wedding, so they’re not breaking any rules,” Curry said. “As of right now, they can’t come. I don’t know how the process is going. If they show up, they show up. If not, I understand why.”
Poor Curry thought it was bad when he needed to ask the bride's father for his daughter's hand in marriage. Now he needs to turn to NBA commissioner David Stern for a second level of permission.

"Does anyone here object to this union? Speak now or forever hold your peace."

"I do," shouts Stern as he emerges from underneath a pew in the church's fourth row. "Silas just slapped Curry's back and whispered 'congratulations' in his ear. That will be one million dollars! Please make the check payable to Adam Silver."

OK, OK, it's not quite that ridiculous. Given the recent, clear precedent established by the Bosh wedding, Curry's nuptials should come off without a hitch and with the entire invited guest list in attendance.

Still, what a hassle. Requiring that these players and coaches formally request permission without rubberstamping it? Terrible. As if newlyweds didn't have enough to stress about.
Posted on: June 28, 2011 2:26 am
Edited on: June 28, 2011 2:35 am
 

Golden State Warriors to buy D-League's Wizards

The Golden State Warriors have reportedly purchased a stake in the Dakota Wizards, a D-League team. Posted by Ben Golliver. joe-lacob

Bismarck, North Dakota, is a long, long way from the Golden Gate Bridge. The Golden State Warriors, under new owners Joe Lacob and Peter Gruber, have just shortened the distance considerably.

RidiculousUpside.com reports that the Warriors have "bought into" the Dakota Wizards of the NBA Developmental League, giving Golden State the opportunity to run the Wizards as their exclusive affiliate.
The Golden State Warriors have bought into the NBA Development League's Dakota Wizards, according to a source with knowledge of the situation, making the two teams one-to-one affiliates for the upcoming season. The D-League team has called an 11 a.m. press conference on Tuesday in Bismarck, ND, to announce the new affiliation.

The Warriors are far from local, but considering the Wizards advertised 2011-12 season tickets in Monday's press release, there's a very good chance that the team will remain in Bismarck for at least the upcoming season.
With each passing month, Warriors ownership continues to put its money where its mouth is. Upon taking over the team last summer, Lacob and Gruber pledged to make the financial commitments necessary to turn the Warriors into a first-rate NBA team.

In the past month alone, the Warriors have shelled out big dollars for big name coach Mark Jackson, brought on NBA legend Jerry West as a consultant, and spent millions of dollars to buy a second round draft pick with which they selected project Jeremy Tyler. Now, they have invested in their own D-League team. That, my friends, is real commitment and smart ownership.

Of course, the Warriors are no stranger to the D-League. They've regularly sent players down for seasoning and have effectively used the D-League to find players who wound up sticking on their roster. Guys like Reggie Williams and Anthony Tolliver. Not to mention: When you draft players like Jeremy Lin, owning your own D-League team can really come in handy.

According to RidiculousUpside.com, the Warriors join the New Jersey Nets, New York Knicks and Los Angeles Lakers as teams that have bought all or part of a D-League affiliate in order to establish a direct affiliation during this offseason. Boom time for the D-League, apparently.
Posted on: June 27, 2011 2:16 pm
Edited on: June 27, 2011 3:16 pm
 

Derrick Williams is Rookie of the Year favorite

Minnesota Timberwolves forward Derrick Williams is the odds-on favorite to win 2011-2012 Rookie of the Year. Posted by Ben Golliver.

derrick-williams-large

Derrick Williams might have been the No. 2 selection in the 2011 NBA Draft, but he's sitting in the pole positon to win the 2012 NBA Rookie of the Year award. 

Bodog.com
has released its early odds for which member of the Draft Class of 2011 will take home the Rookie of the Year award. Williams, a dynamic combo forward out of Arizona, leapfrogged one-and-done Duke point guard Kyrie Irving, drafted by Cleveland Cavaliers, to claim the No. 1 spot. The No. 10 selection, BYU guard Jimmer Fredette, selected by the Sacramento Kings, also finished ahead of Irving.

Here's a look at the top 10. Strictly for entertainment purposes only.

Why does Irving slide? Two reasons. To win Rookie of the Year, you must be as NBA-ready as possible and have the opportunity to play boatloads of minutes so that you can accumulate stats.

In Irving's case, he missed a good chunk of his rookie season at Duke, raising questions about how ready he is to be an impact player in the NBA from Day One. Second, the Cavaliers have a muddled point guard position with Baron Davis, Ramon Sessions and Boobie Gibson hanging around. That will likely get sorted out before next season rolls around, but it will be difficult to trade Davis, who is sure to get some serious burn.

Williams, on the other hand, is arguably the best physical specimen in this year's class. The Timberwolves have nothing to lose and, while Michael Beasley is on the roster and has a similar game, Minnesota has every incentive to turn Williams loose. With Rubio in the fold, look for the Timberwolves to continue to play an up-tempo game, with Williams given the green light to shoot and attack as often as he likes. One possible area of concern: Williams and Rubio, by virtue of playing on the same team, could cancel each other out.

Fredette represents the dumb money on this list. With no limit on his shot attempts in college, he compiled absurd scoring numbers. While he enters Sacramento figuring to get plenty of minutes, Tyreke Evans will command a very large chunk of the team's possessions, as will emerging big man DeMarcus Cousins. If Fredette doesn't defer, he will be marginalized. Ownership might be infatuated with him, but winning over his teammates is far more important.

Kanter appears to be more NBA-ready than most, but he enters a very crowded frontcourt in Utah. Surely he will carve out a solid role. But will it be enough to put up real numbers?

One solid dark-horse candidate: Kemba Walker. While he might not start from Day One because of D.J. Augustin, Walker will find plenty of available minutes in Charlotte's torn-down backcourt. The Bobcats are entering Year One of a major rebuild and thus will have Walker's development as a top -- perhaps the top -- priority. He enters the NBA after three years in college, and he proved that he was a star on that level. 

Ultimately, I would expect this to boil down to a three-man race between Williams, Irving and Walker. Williams is a worthy early favorite.
Posted on: June 27, 2011 10:26 am
Edited on: June 27, 2011 11:06 am
 

Rockets made offer for Biedrins?

Posted by Royce Young

The Rockets are looking to find a new starting center. Yao Ming's future is extremely uncertain, Brad Miller just got traded and Chuck Hayes, the current starter, is only 6-foot-6. So they're targeting some available big men.

One that's seemingly available? Golden State's Andris Biedrins.

According to the Bay Area News Group, the Rockets made an offer, albeit sort of a halfhearted one, for the Warrior seven-footer.

"Was able to confirm reports by the Houston Chronicle that the Rockets are indeed interested in acquiring Biedrins," he wrote. "So why is Biedrins still a Warrior you ask? While this may seem the perfect answer to the Warriors' ills, Golden State, according to multiple sources, are not at all enamored with the Rockets' offer thus far. I've been told the Rockets have offered Hasheem Thabeet and Jordan Hill. Haven't confirmed if they were offered as a package, but the figures add up ... Bottom line for the Warriors: that's not enough."

Biedrins isn't an All-Star center or anything, but Houston's going to have to do better than Jordan Hill and Hasheem Thabeet. Biedrins is a horrible offensively liability, but he's a defensive presence and one of the league's best rebounders. He averaged a double-double for two straight years, including a season of 11.2 rebounds per game.

The Warriors have been rumored to be interested in trading Biedrins for some time. Biedrins though is signed through 2014 making $9 million a season with an early termination option in the final year. So it's understandable that people aren't blowing the Warriors away for a one-way player that's owed $27 million over the next three years. 

Fact is though, Biedrins would probably be a pretty nice fit in Houston. The Rockets need some size and need someone to handle the primary minutes at center. Pretty much anyone will work next to Luis Scola, but Hayes, while a tough, hardworking player, just isn't going to get it done. Biedrins would give depth and size the Rocket front court.

So he'd work well there. They're just going to have to do better than Thabeet. Which is understandable, but really, why are the Warriors intent on hanging on to him? Biedrins isn't a fit for the Warriors and they have young talent that needs to see the floor. Even if you lose the trade, dumping Biedrins is probably for the best.


Posted on: June 25, 2011 5:12 pm
Edited on: June 25, 2011 6:31 pm
 

2011 NBA Draft: 5 second round steals

Here's a look at five second round steals in the 2011 NBA Draft. Posted by Ben Golliver. davis-bertans

1. Davis Bertans -- San Antonio Spurs at No. 42

Acquiring George Hill for picks was a nice win-now move for the Indiana Pacers, but the San Antonio Spurs did very well to get value in the package coming back. Snagging Kawhi Leonard, the major slipper in the first round, was a great move. Picking up Bertans, a Latvian forward with first round potential, was arguably even better. That Bertans fell to No. 42 and the Spurs, historically one of the smartest organizations in the NBA, seems almost unfair. An excellent shooter with great length and a bit of handle to boot, Bertans can develop at his own pace overseas, ready to inject talent when needed in the post-Duncan era.

2. Darius Morris -- Los Angeles Lakers at No. 41

The Lakers needed to address the point guard position after exiting the playoffs earlier than usual this year. The aging Derek Fisher and the frantic Steve Blake didn't perform up to expectations and there are question marks about Shannon Brown's future in Los Angeles. Morris, who has often drawn comparisons to Andre Miller for his play-making and size, was the best point guard remaining on the board and had been considered a first round prospect by some talent evaluators. The Lakers filled a hole beautifully and hedge nicely against Father Time. 

3. Josh Selby -- Memphis Grizzlies at No. 49

Did anyone fall further than Josh Selby? A top high school talent endured a confusing and disappointing single season at Kansas before bailing to the pros as a one-and-done. Anyone snatching him up in the second round, given those circumstances, was getting good value. That he lasted until No. 49 is pretty amazing. Memphis -- led by no-nonsense coach Lionel Hollins -- showed this season that it can keep difficult personalities and egos in check and turn a group of cast-offs into a team that defeated the San Antonio Spurs in the first round of the Western Conference playoffs. If Selby is able to stick and get his career back on track, his scoring ability in the backcourt would make a trade of O.J. Mayo less painful. If not, the Grizzlies can simply cut their losses. All-reward, no-risk here.

4. Jeremy Tyler -- Golden State Warriors at No. 39

Jeremy Tyler is a risk, without question, and the Warriors are already reportedly $2 million deep into that risk after purchasing the pick used to select him from the Charlotte Bobcats. Tyler was a top 15 talent in this year's draft crop, once regarded as the best high school player in his class. He's shown signs of maturation and his offensive instincts are fairly well-honed. He will need to grow up as a professional but the same goes for many in this class. Getting him on a second-round contract with the flexibility of a non-guaranteed deal means he is on a tight leash and will have every reason to be on his best behavior. He's in a position where he's got to prove himself all over again to really see an NBA payday, the type of which he expected when he left high school early to play overseas years ago. Getting him fully in shape to reach that goal is the first step. No one should be surprised if he becomes the most talented player picked in the second round within two or three years. Golden State needed to get tougher and bulkier inside, which they did here. 

5. Andrew Goudelock -- Los Angeles Lakers at No. 46

Goudelock is a small school scoring point guard without much of a defensive reputation. That description alone carries plenty of question marks and risks. But the Lakers -- with Kobe Bryant, Andrew Bynum, Paul Gasol and Andrew Bynum in the fold -- have the talent, not to mention the deep pocketbooks, to sustain those risks with ease. As the guard trio of Bryant, Fisher and Blake ages, GM Mitch Kupchak's job was simply to inject the roster with youth and upside. In taking both Morris and Goudelock in the second round, he gets two different looks to fulfill that goal. Given that they are both on second-round deals, he only needs one of them to stick. The fact that both guards have the upside to be rotation players -- in L.A. or elsewhere -- means the Lakers landed two solid assets late in a shallow pool. That's intelligent drafting.
Posted on: June 24, 2011 12:37 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 11:20 am
 

2011 NBA Draft Winners and Losers



Posted by Matt Moore

It's all over. After an underwhelming crop of draft choices led to a flurry of trades, the dust has settled and the picks are wearing the right hats, finally. Here are your winners and losers of the 2011 NBA Draft:

Winners

Cleveland Cavaliers: Irving is mostly a case of winning by default, but they wouldn't have been the first team to be unable to get out of their own way with an obvious pick. Irving gives them a franchise point guard to build around and was the best player overall in this draft. Going for Derrick Williams would have been sheer hubris in order to burn LeBron by choosing a replacement forward. Then, with the fourth, they could have opted for Valanciunas, which would have been a good pick. But there's a reason so many teams were chasing Tristan Thompson. His workouts showed how he would translate on the next level, and with that kind of athleticism, he provides a good running partner for Irving. They managed to not overcomplicate the combination of two top-five picks. They got good talent both small and big. That's a win right there.

Washington Wizards: The Wizards very quietly had a terrific draft. First Jan Vesely was available, who fits a need for them at slashing forward. With his athleticism and aggression, he makes a perfect partner to run the break with John Wall. Then, miraculously, Chris Singleton tumbled all the way down to No.18 where the Wizards jumped all over him. Singleton is a lottery talent that fell out of the top 14. He gives the Wizards the ability to move Andray Blatche if they can find a taker for his contract. He can rebound and defend exceptionally well. Singleton's length and athleticism, combined with a chip on his shoulder from dropping, makes him a great pick for the Wizards. Shelvin Mack in the second round was a great value pick for backup point guard.

Charlotte Bobcats: In a day, the Bobcats transformed Stephen Jackson, Shaun Livingston, the No.9 and No.19 into Corey Maggette, Bismack Biyombo, and Kemba Walker. That's a great haul. I've never been big on either of the Bobcats' draft picks, but when you consider the balance between an athletic super-freak who is unrefined and an established winner with limited upside, the Bobcats managed to grab two of the most hyped players in the draft. Biyombo provides length and athleticism to pair with Tyrus Thomas. Walker creates a complication at point guard with D.J. Augustin already being an undersized point guard. But Augustin has never won over the Bobcats organization and Walker will be given every chance to compete for the starting role. If his size issues aren't as much a concern as they've been made out to be, and if his shot creation translates to the next level, the Bobcats have just instantly created their foundation for the future while ditching one of their biggest contracts. A great start for the Cho era in Charlotte. 

Denver Nuggets: Raymond Felton got flipped for Andre Miller's non-guaranteed expiring contract and Jordan Hamilton, one of the steals of the draft who inexplicably fell. This for a guard the Nuggets didn't want in the first place. Oh, yeah, and they nabbed Kenneth Faried, who perfectly fits their needs and is a great value pick where they took him. Masai Ujiri is better than you.


Losers


Minnesota Timberwolves: Yes, again. Williams is a great pick, if they were moving Michael Beasley. Or if they were trading Williams. But David Kahn reportedly says they're not moving Williams. They wasted an opportunity to create more assets by moving either one, and instead, will now bullheadedly try to cram two similar players (three if you count Anthony Randolph) into a spot. It's a messy situation and Kahn should have taken one of the other offers made to him for the pick. Then there's the other trade, which was just a mess all over. They pulled in another Euro center to add to their collection, Brad Miller and his too-long, too-expensive contract, and ditched Jonny Flynn. The only redeeming quality is the future first which may or may not be protected into oblivion. Another sterling night for the Wolves. If Williams turns out to be worthy of the No.2 pick, and count me among the people that think he is, and the Wolves recognize that versus burying him as they did Kevin Love, this can be salvaged. From this vantage point, it doesn't look great. 

Update: Wolves wound up swapping Mirotic for the 28th and 43rd picks from the Bulls, then moved the 28th pick to Miami for the 31st pick, which they then sold as well as the 38th pick which was theirs. They used the 43rd on Malcolm Lee, and then traded for the 57th. While not getting Mirotic is a lot better than drafting him, they did all that and wound up with a first later, Malcolm Lee, and Targuy Ngombo. Not a great haul, there. Saved the boss some cash, though.

Golden State Warriors: How many guards can they need? New head coach Mark Jackson and GM Larry Riley constantly talked about defense. Then the Warriors took a shooter. They haven't moved Monta Ellis, so now on the roster they have Stephen Curry, Monta Ellis, Charlie Bell, Jeremy Lin, Acie Law and Reggie Williams. And they just added Klay Thompson. It was an unnecessary move with bigger players with more defensive presence available. The Warriors have enough talent to not need the best player available. But, again, they opt for the usual. Disappointing.

Portland Trail Blazers: Where did that come from? The Blazers first take a huge reach on Nolan Smith at No.21. Smith had his proponents as the draft got closer, and certainly isn't a terrible pick. But in taking him, they elected to create redundancy after trading too much (Andre Miller and Rudy Fernandez) for Raymond Felton. The result is a reformed back court as the Blazers had promised, but not nearly as good as one you would have thought they could carry with the pieces available. Smith may work out well, but he'll never be starter caliber. And, with as many talented guards as there were late in the draft, taking him was a bit of a shock. Jon Diebler is 6-6 and can shoot. That's about it.  


Individual Winners:


Jan Vesely: Underrated as everyone talked about Kanter and Valanciunas, Vesely not only winds up with a good team fit for himself, but stole the highlight of the night with a kiss on the mouth of his lady friend. Then he said "I like the John Wall game" in his TV interview. Vesely came off incredibly cool for a 21-year-old Euro who can't shoot.

Tristan Thompson: Congratulations, Tristan, you cleared about ten spots in three days! It's a marathon, not a race.

Joe Dumars: Lucks into Brandon Knight. Rodney Stuckey problem: solved.


Individual Losers:


Brandon Knight: Plummeted due to his attitude and wound up in dysfunctional Detroit.

Josh Selby: If there was no age limit to the draft, Selby would have been a top ten pick last year. Now he falls all the way to the second round.

Jordan Hamilton: Something really bad must have been found on Hamilton, medically or otherwise. There was a nineteen-pick differential between Hamilton and a player who has rumors of being older than listed with a back issue and a contract problem. That's not a good look for the Texas ex.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com