Tag:Derrick Rose
Posted on: September 27, 2011 12:46 pm
Edited on: September 28, 2011 5:52 pm
 

NBA 2K12 overall player ratings unveiled

Posted by Ben Golliver

nba-2k12-player-ratings

Player ratings for the popular basketball video game, NBA 2K12, continue to leak in advance of the game's Oct. 4 release.

A few weeks back, we noted that Miami Heat All-Star forward LeBron James was poised to lead the league in overall ranking with a 98, topping Los Angeles Lakers All-Star guard Kobe Bryant, who checked in at 94.

Unofficially, just nine current NBA players check in with ratings at or above "90".  All nine, including James and Bryant,  were All-Stars last season. The others: Miami Heat guard Dwyane Wade, Orlando Magic center Dwight Howard, New Orleans Hornets guard Chris Paul, Oklahoma City Thunder forward Kevin Durant, Chicago Bulls guard Derrick Rose, New York Knicks forward Carmelo Anthony and New Jersey Nets guard Deron Williams

A number of teams from the past are also included in the game. The 1992-1993 Chicago Bulls are included, led by Michael Jordan, who is rated a 99, and Scottie Pippen, who is rated a 90. Jordan also receives a 99 on the 1997-1998 iteration of the Bulls while he scores just a 92 on the 1985-1986 team.

An expanded list of player rankings has been uploaded to YouTube by user NBA2K12stuff. More rankings have been revealed or compiled by PastaPadre.com and Examiner.com.

Here's a compiled list of ratings for some star players from those sources. Remember: this year's rookie class is not included in the game.  

LeBron James -- Miami Heat -- (98)
Dwyane Wade -- Miami Heat -- (96)
Kobe Bryant -- Los Angeles Lakers -- (94)
Dwight Howard -- Orlando Magic -- (93)
Chris Paul -- New Orleans Hornets -- (93)
Kevin Durant -- Oklahoma City Thunder -- (92)
Derrick Rose -- Chicago Bulls -- (92)
Carmelo Anthony -- New York Knicks -- (91)
Deron Williams -- New Jersey Nets -- (90)
Russell Westbrook -- Oklahoma City Thunder -- (88)
Amar'e Stoudemire -- New York Knicks -- (88)
Pau Gasol -- Los Angeles Lakers -- (86)
Rudy Gay -- Memphis Grizzlies -- (86)
Andre Iguodala -- Philadelphia 76ers --(85)
Blake Griffin -- Los Angeles Clippers -- (85)
Dirk Nowitzki -- Dallas Mavericks -- (85)
Manu Ginobili -- San Antonio Spurs -- (85)
Rajon Rondo -- Boston Celtics -- (85)
Tim Duncan -- San Antonio Spurs -- (84)
Joe Johnson -- Atlanta Hawks -- (84)
Josh Smith -- Atlanta Hawks -- (84)
Steve Nash -- Phoenix Suns -- (84)
Monta Ellis -- Golden State Warriors -- (83)
Kevin Garnett -- Boston Celtics -- (83)
Stephen Jackson -- Milwaukee Bucks -- (83)
Gerald Wallace -- Portland Trail Blazers -- (83)
LaMarcus Aldridge -- Portland Trail Blazers -- (83)
Zach Randolph -- Memphis Grizzlies -- (83)
Paul Pierce -- Boston Celtics -- (82)
Eric Gordon -- Los Angeles Clippers -- (82)
Joakim Noah -- Chicago Bulls -- (82)
John Wall -- Washington Wizards -- (82)
Kevin Love -- Minnesota Timberwolves -- (81)
Al Jefferson -- Utah Jazz -- (81)
Danny Granger -- Indiana Pacers -- (81)
Chris Bosh -- Miami Heat -- (80)
Tyreke Evans -- Sacramento Kings -- (80)
Tony Parker -- San Antonio Spurs -- (80)
Stephen Curry -- Golden State Warriors -- (80)
Andrew Bynum -- Los Angeles Lakers -- (79)

Hat tip: Welcome To Loud City 
Posted on: August 24, 2011 5:15 pm
Edited on: August 25, 2011 2:30 am
 

Hong Kong pop singer Pakho scores on Derrick Rose

Posted by Ben Golliverpakho

After this summer, there can no longer be any question as to whether the globalization of basketball has been a success. Why not? Because wherever the NBA's best players travel, they keep getting worked by anonymous semi-professionals and non-professionals. 

A few weeks back, Miami Heat All-Star forward LeBron James decided to jump into an exhibition game between Taiwanese All-Star teams, only to get ripped by his defender and dunked on as he tried to recover in transition. You'll remember that he was so rattled by the exchange that he immediately travelled and threw the ball out of bounds.

Now, Chicago Bulls point guard Derrick Rose, the NBA's reigning MVP, headed to China on a sneaker tour with adidas. There, he found himself in a game of one-on-one with a relatively famous pop singer from Hong Kong named Pakho.

Pakho, 26, is signed to Warner and his official website is mostly in Chinese, but it reveals that he stands 182 centimeters tall, his favorite movies are Sweet November and Notting Hill and his favorite animal is a cat. Basketball is indeed one of his favorite sports but it is listed after swimming. 

Anyway, with those sterling athletic credentials, Pakho finds himself with the ball, being defended by Rose near the three-point line, with a team's worth of players cheering him on, an emcee keeping score and an exuberant crowd watching intently. With a ball fake and then a stutter hesitation, Pakho takes two dribbles to his right, catching Rose slightly by surprise. Rose recovers instantaneously and continues to shade Pakho right. Entirely unafraid, the pop singer leans into a one-handed runner from about eight feet. Rose rises to attempt to swat it but grabs only air, and the ball nestles cleanly through the net, much to the crowd's delight.

The sequence is not nearly as embarrasing as James' string of errors but it's still a touch cringe-inducing. Rose does hit a jumper and throw down a dunk in the clip to establish who is boss, but the damage is done.

Here's the video -- via SlamOnline.com -- of Derrick Rose getting beaten off the dribble for a basket by Pakho via YouTuber user logic16x

To watch the exchange, cue it up to the 1:15 mark.  



Image via AsianFanatics.net.
Posted on: August 23, 2011 8:44 am
Edited on: August 23, 2011 12:50 pm
 

The EOB Elite 100, 1-5: Best of the best



By Matt Moore


This is the final segment of the CBSSports.com Eye on Basketball Elite 100, counting down the top-100 players in the NBA. The goal was to create the best ranking of players based on total value, which comprises everything from respect and status to upside to statistical production and intangibles. All three of our NBA bloggers ranked every player, then we took the average to determine our ranking.

Check out the earlier installments: 100-91 | 90-81 | 80-71 | 70-61 | 60-51 | 50-41 | 40-31 | 30-21 | 20-11 | 10-6

We've come to the end, my friends. 

What we discovered while making this list is that the NBA has such remarkable athletes, that the gap between one to the next is quite small. There are no clear dividing lines. You make the best estimation off of overall value, take the aggregate, and may the basketball gods have mercy on your soul. You look at every player near the top and say, "that's got to be too low," until you look at the players above him. Then you begrudgingly move on to those players who you feel much the same about. We're blessed with incredible players in this league, versatile and extremely talented. Our attempt in ranking them wasn't perfect, and the best aspect is finding out your thoughts.

No one's going to agree on these lists completely. For every item you find accurate, there will be 10 you disagree with. And we're betting our top spot will neither surprise you nor please you. But, after watching these players night in and night out, this is the top of the chart in comparison to all others. It's been fun figuring out who goes where, even if it kept us up nights. And we promise we'll keep watching and working to figure it out every night to come. 

You know, once we have a season again.

Here now are the top five players in the NBA in overall value according to the EOB Elite 100.

5. Derrick Rose, PG, age 22, Chicago Bulls
2011 stats: 25.0 ppg, 4.1 rpg, 7.7 apg, 1.0 spg, .6 bpg, 44.5 FG percentage, 23.5 PER
Composite rankings (random order): 5, 5, 4

What I love about Rose ending up here is that he's simultaneously too low and too high and both arguments are valid. He's the reigning MVP. His team secured the top spot in the playoffs overall and won the most regular-season games. He led the Bulls to the Eastern Conference Finals. Rose is young, brilliant, explosive, and seems to improve with every game. He's also inefficient at times, both in shooting percentage and turnovers. He's got great assist numbers and yet never blows you away with his passing game. He has elite speed and tremendous finishing ability, but his mid-range jumper is a work in progress and his 3-point shot, which improved considerably in 2010-11, is wildly inconsistent. He'll shoot 70 percent from the arc one game and go 1 of 5 the next. The end result is a career-best percentage that could go way up if he manages to stabilize it. 

Rose is an elite player in this league, but ... 1: We haven't seen MVP-level play from him beyond this season, and those above him have been at it for years; 2: His postseason struggles, particularly against the Heat stick with us. The problems did go beyond the Heat series, however. Rose had a 35.2 usage rate in the playoffs, which is astronomical (and he had to; have you seen Carlos Boozer?) yet only had a 43 effective field goal percentage. The way the Heat were able to adjust to solve him lingers, despite a stellar 2011 campaign. 

What Rose did stands out. I described Chris Paul as the best pure point guard in the league earlier, and I still believe him to be the best point guard. But that's because Rose isn't a point guard by any traditional sense. He's not even really a point guard by any advanced metric. This isn't to say he can't do what point guards do. He does, and quite well. It's that Rose is so prolific in his game, that he extends beyond the traditional position evaluations. I'm fond of saying, "Rose isn't a point guard, he's not a shooting guard, he's not even really a guard. He's Derrick Rose." His versatility and explosiveness are so unmatched, his specific style and approach so unique, he extends beyond the traditional models and establishes himself as his own entity. Even if that entity sometimes shows hiccups we saw in the ECF. 

Don't get too upset, Bulls fans. This ranking definitely hides the fact that our committee definitely believes that this will be the last time Rose is this low, and that his shot at the top spot next year is as strong as anyone's. And yet any drop-off from his tremendous season would be a huge letdown. This is the top of the NBA, where Rose belongs, and all of these factors make up the reasons why at No. 5. He's at once too low and too high for anyone and everyone. Say hello to Derrick Rose, the NBA's newest most-polarizing player. -- MM

4. Dwyane Wade, SG, 29, Miami Heat
2011 stats: 25.4 ppg, 6.4 rpg, 4.6 apg, 50 FG percentage, 30.6 3-point percentage, 25.65 PER
Composite rankings (random order): 4, 5, 4

Most of the talk about the Miami Heat has centered around LeBron James. He's the lightning rod, the controversial figure, the talking point. But here's what should tell you that Dwyane Wade still is entirely legit: The Heat are still his team. LeBron may generate most of the chatter, but the Heat just feel like Wade's team.

Wade sometimes is forgotten as a superstar for reasons I don't exactly know, but he's a champion, a Finals MVP, an elite defender and a top-tier scorer. His production may have dipped a bit because he's sharing duties with LeBron and Chris Bosh, but don't forget he averaged 30.2 points a game on nearly 50 percent shooting in 2008-09. Don't forget that he's averaging 6.3 assists a game for his career with two seasons of 7.5 a game. In fact, don't forget that for his career, he goes 25-6-5.

Wade is 29 though, and he's had a few major injuries and surgeries so he might start trending down in the next few seasons. He's the type of player that plays so hard he's borderline reckless. Eventually the wear and tear is going to slow him down. But he's still elite because he's a complete player. You may think of LeBron first when someone brings up the Heat but it's Wade's team and that's not changing. -- RY

3. Dirk Nowitzki, F, 33, Dallas Mavericks
2011 Stats: 23.0 points, 7.0 rebounds, 2.6 assists, 51.7 FG percentage 23.52 PER
Composite rankings (random order): 5, 2, 3

We’ve arrived at the pinnacle of Nowitzki’s NBA career, a summit from which the German forward triumphantly holds up the Larry O’Brien and his NBA Finals MVP trophies and looks down upon all the critics who said he was too “soft” and not wired to be a No. 1 option on a title-winning team. The Mavericks were somewhat improbable champions and nobody benefited from their victory more -- at least from a perception standpoint -- than Nowitzki, whose unbelievable scoring efficiency and unmatched ability to hit off-balance shots stole the show during the 2011 playoffs.

Bracketed by Shawn Marion and Tyson Chandler, it didn’t much matter that Nowitzki still isn't an All-NBA defender and never will be. He performed capably in man-to-man or zone looks, but his overall offensive game was his ace in the hole; nobody could stop him when he needed to get a bucket in the postseason. Nowitzki wasn't only a weapon when he's leaning back and falling away, uncorking a jumper at an impossible angle. He’s agile enough, even at his size, to take most NBA bigs off the dribble and he can finish around the rim in a variety of creative ways, usually more smooth rather than emphatic. He commands constant attention and is a surgeon when it comes to picking apart weak, early or late help defense, equally adept at threading the needle to cutters or throwing on-the-money skip passes. He can shoot with range, from a stop or on the move; he can set picks and find his spots. Despite the spotlight, he’s still an underrated rebounder. And, please, don’t leave out his ability to pump fake to draw fouls and to convert his free throws at a ridiculous 89.2 percent.

Put simply, Nowitzki is so good on offense that he we’ve ranked him ahead of all but the very best two-way players in the league. Not too shabby for a soft, choking European who is afraid to play down low. -- BG

2. Dwight Howard, C, 25, Orlando Magic 2011 stats: 22.9 ppg, 14.1 rpg, 2.4 bpg, 59.3 FG percentage 26.13 PER Composite rankings (random order): 2, 2, 3

There's one question to ask yourself when decided where you want to place Dwight Howard: How much do you value defense? Do you see it as the downtime in between offensive possessions (aka the Don Nelson philosophy) or do you see it as an equally important part to the game as offense, and in some cases more important?

The way you lean there tells you what to do with Howard, because he's the league's best defensive player and it's not especially close. He's won three straight Defensive Player of the Year awards and it's not only because he blocks shots and grabs a lot of rebounds. It's really about the shots he doesn't block. Officials stats don't keep track of altered shots or probably better, non-attempted shots that might've been taken had Howard not been looming in the lane. But I can guarantee you Howard leads the league in both those categories and it's not close. He changes every game, and does it just by being on the floor.

That makes it sound like he's one dimensional, which isn't accurate. He's not a dynamic offensive player. He scores in brutish ways -- alley-oops, put-backs, easy baskets. He gets it done with little finesse and without a go-to shot. But however it happens, he still averaged 22.9 points a game last year and shot an outstanding 59 percent from the field. He's getting better offensively and at only 25, he still has some space to grow.

If Howard's offense ever catches up to his defense, he'd make a realistic push at the top spot on this list. In terms of how much a game is impacted per night, Howard is king. His win shares are ridiculous (14.4) and his PER is outstanding (26.13). Pretty much any way you want to measure Howard, he lives up. And that's without being as good as he really could be on one end.  Now that's scary. 

1. LeBron James, SF, 26, Miami Heat
2011 stats: 26.7 ppg, 7.5 rpg, 7.0 apg, 1.6 spg, .6 bpg, 51.0 FG percentage, 27.3 PER
Composite rankings (unanimous): 1, 1, 1

Thoughts from all three of our panel members on the top player in the NBA.

Matt Moore: You probably don't like this. That's OK. We don't like it much, either. LeBron James has showed an arrogance in the past year since The Decision that is so excessive the only way to defend it is to claim that all athletes are arrogant. Even then, it's the matter of degree that gets James in trouble. James never seems to say the right thing, never seems to take the right approach, never seems to put himself in the best light. This is a stunning change from four years ago when he was basically a shadow on the wall that sold shoes. It's a year after The Decision and we saw the best and worst of James. He continued to show the versatility that in large part puts him in this spot. His team made the Finals, and was two games away from a title, as they should have been with all that talent. And yet we saw James "shrink" or "choke" or whatever hyper-dramatic interpretation you prefer. There's no getting around the idea of whether you believe in "clutch" or not, James was not there when his team needed him most. That's pretty damning stuff. 

So how did he not only wind up as the top player, but the unanimous one?

Because he's better. Kobe Bryant's age is starting to affect him along with numerous injuries that have slowed him. Dirk Nowitzki is getting older and doesn't have the defensive impact James does (James remains an underrated individual and help defender, which is saying something considering how lauded he rightfully is for it). Rose is still learning to be efficient from everywhere on the floor and to be a better defender. Howard's still growing into his complete offensive game. For James, nothing he does is beyond reason anymore. A 40-point triple-double is conceivable from him (though not on this Heat team barring injuries because of usage). He can make the chase-down block at one end, lob a perfect outlet pass, then recover and jam home an alley-oop after leaving from mid-wing. He can pull-up and nail the mid-range jumper, even as that part of his game is at both still developing and something he turns to far too often. He can hit from the perimeter (ask the Celtics if you don't believe me) and bulldoze his way to the rim to draw the foul (ask the Bulls if you don't believe me). He's a one-man tour de force, able to cover the entire floor, able to play at any position, able to do more than any other player in the league. 

That's why he's No.1. Like it or not.

Royce Young: It's kind of a relief that we don't have to have the debate anymore. No longer is it "Kobe or LeBron?" No longer is it a question as to who the league's best player is. We all know. It's LeBron, whether you like it or not. 

You can try and talk yourself into someone else. You can try and single out LeBron's failures, his faults and his issues. You can try and point out his curious choke job in The Finals. You can try and devalue him simply because you don't like him. That's all fine. But you can't deny that he's the best player in basketball. He just is.  Even trying to fit in alongside two other All-Stars in Miami LeBron put out an incredible season. He still led the league in PER (again), still went for 26-7-7 and still was the single most dangerous player on the floor every night. And before you say, "Oh yeah, well people prove things in the playoffs and LeBron failed!" That's true, but only to a degree. Remember how he handcuffed Derrick Rose for the last two games of the Eastern Finals? Remember how he destroyed the Bulls in leading an incredible Game 5 comeback? Remember how he and Wade worked perfectly in concert in Game 1 of The Finals? It's easy to just forget all the good stuff because of how it all finished. But LeBron didn't completely lay an egg. He just did so in the last three games. Doesn't mean he's not still the best player in the game.  

Ben Golliver:2010-2011 was a boastful, bewildering season for James, who arrived in Miami with unprecedented hype and expectations, only to crash and burn in the NBA Finals as soon as his first title was within reach. The on-court imperfections are clearly established at this point: a difficulty impacting the offense without the ball in his hands, an erratic jump shot, and the occasional tendency to tighten up when the stakes are highest. The off-court annoyances are equally obvious: a lack of self-awareness, a massive ego, and an inability to relate to the common man or to productively process criticism.

Still, judging James or his season solely on his meltdown in the final three games of the NBA Finals would be a huge mistake. Zooming out to view the entire year, he was spectacular as always statistically, posting the top PER in the league despite the fact that he was getting acclimated to an entirely new set of teammates and a new way of sharing top dog priorities with Dwyane Wade. He was a menace defensively, sending the aging Boston Celtics into the past during the second round of the Eastern Conference playoffs and swallowing NBA MVP Derrick Rose whole in the Eastern Conference Finals. James remains the NBA’s best and most versatile athlete and saw time at four -- if not five -- positions for the Heat this season. There’s not a player in the league who can guard him one-on-one and there's not really anyone that he couldn’t defend at least passably.

Even for his critics, who were rightfully gleeful when things fell apart against the Dallas Mavericks, there must be a sense that this was as tough as it will get for James, that the perfect storm of hatred and disgust that followed The Decision will eventually dissipate, leaving James to finally assume the throne he clearly believes belongs to him.

Posted on: August 22, 2011 4:14 pm
 

Gasol, Durant, CP3 and Rose to play in Australia?

Posted by Royce Young

Already a group of NBA players took to the Philippines to play in an exhibition game. Some made in the neighborhood of $400,000 for it. So why not go for round two, outback edition?

According to the Sunday Herald Sun, Pau Gasol, Kevin Durant, Chris Paul and Derrick Rose are some of the rumored NBA stars that could play three games in Melbourne. It would be three All-Star exhibition style games. Already two sponsors have committed to support the tour and pay insurance which will cost something like $1 million.

No date has really been outlined but obviously this is a lockout contingent tour. If the collective bargaining agreement gets resolved, this will be most certainly dissolve.

One question though: Why no Andrew Bogut? Or Patty Mills, for that matter? Both are native Australians and I'm sure have a pretty good base of support there. Instead it's Durant, Gasol, Paul and Rose? Not a bad lineup at all of course, but you'd think it would've been like Bogut or somebody that was organizing this.

Right now, Gasol is prepping with the Spain national team for Eurobasket 2011 in Lithuania which starts later this month. So figuring out those details will be an issue, but there's no doubt if you pay, they'll play. I think that's sort of how the labor negotiations are going too.
Posted on: August 22, 2011 12:02 pm
 

Derrick Rose guarantees multiple NBA titles

Posted by Ben Golliverderrick-rose

Another NBA MVP without a title to his name has seen fit to blur the line between confidence and cockiness.

In an interview with HoopsHype.com, Chicago Bulls point guard Derrick Rose, usually a humble mumbler, guaranteed that he will eventually own more than one ring. 
"I won’t be satisfied until I win a championship. I’m not satisfied at all. There’s not a doubt in my mind that I’m not going to win a championship. I’m going win multiple championships. It’s not a doubt in my mind."
Rose also said his Bulls are good to go as is and don't require any major additions, other than the added experience that came with their run to the Eastern Conference Finals last season.
"If everyone comes in and work on their game, I think that we have a good shot of winning without getting anybody to come to my team. I think everything was just so new… Last year was my first time getting past the first round of the playoffs. Everything was just new to everybody, and that thing is gonna help us. Last year was the base for our team and the sky’s the limit for us."
If this cart before the horse proclamation sounds familiar, it's because we spent the last year excoriating Miami Heat All-Stars LeBron James, Dwyane Wade and Chris Bosh for throwing a pre-season parade at which James, who has never won a championship, predicted the trio would win "multiple championships" and said that games would be "easy".

Because James is James and Rose is Rose, any outcry over these quotes will pale in comparison to the criticism that the Heat took for their presumptuousness last year.

There are some major, legit circumstantial reasons for that. There wasn't a free agency pursuit or "The Decision" prior to these comments. Rose made his statements overseas while on a tour rather than at a preseason parade. Rose, at 22, is younger than James was last summer (25). The NBA is heading towards a work stoppage rather than its most anticipated season in years. Rose's comments sound more like he's trying to pump himself up rather than shove his greatness in everyone's face. And, perhaps most importantly of all, Rose didn't say, "not two, not three, not four, not five, not six, not seven" in counting off how many titles he planned to win. 

Despite all of that, the same premise underlies the statements from both players. In Rose's eyes, he's ascending to a place where he will leave a lasting mark on the league. For that reason, both players fell victim to the same mistake. Focus on the first title and let your winning do the talking.  

Hat tip: ProBasketballTalk
Posted on: August 22, 2011 11:00 am
Edited on: August 22, 2011 11:02 am
 

NBA Finals loss led to LeBron James' 'worst week'

Posted by Ben Golliver

dwyane-wade-loss

Don't bother with condolence cards or bouquets of flowers. We've learned at least one thing during the NBA lockout: NBA superstars today prefer suffering in silence.

Miami Heat All-Star forward adds his name to the list of All-Stars who transformed into shut-ins following their elimination from the 2011 NBA playoffs.

"It was the worst week I ever had," James told HoopsHype.com when asked about the week following his NBA Finals loss to the Dallas Mavericks. "I hate losing."

And what did he do to pass the time?

"I did nothing," James replied. "Nothing at all."

James' comments mirror those made to the Sun-Sentinel back in July by his teammate, Heat All-Star guard Dwyane Wade.

"The sting is always going to be there when you lose," Wade said at the time. "Obviously, it was my first time ever losing the Finals. The sting is there, no question about it."

Wade also admitted that he purposefully avoided watching basketballl on television.

"I haven't watched ESPN in a long time," Wade added. "It's still hard to watch basketball."

It wasn't just the Heat who took their elimination hard. NBA MVP Derrick Rose, whose Chicago Bulls were eliminated in the Eastern Conference Finals by Miami, said in a Yahoo! Sports interview that he locked himself in his house after losing.

"Being that close [to the NBA Finals], and not getting it, hurt," Rose said. “I just stayed inside the whole time. I didn’t go anywhere else. I wore pajamas, watched a lot of movies, drank Powerade and got delivery food."

Three players at the top of the game with three distinct personalities all responding to losing in the same way. It's no great revelation, but it is interesting.

I suppose it shouldn't be surprising. With the physical toll of a long season, the disappointment that goes with falling short of a goal, the increasingly intense media scrutiny and the heavy travel schedule that comes with the playoffs, the default setting at the start of the offseason for players asked to play huge minutes and carry the load on offense would be recuperation. Not to mention, licking wounds is usually a very personal endeavor.
Posted on: August 7, 2011 1:33 pm
Edited on: August 7, 2011 1:33 pm
 

Derrick Rose has a new adidas shoe: adiZero 2.0

Posted by Ben Golliver

Derrick Rose is so humble that he has apparently decided to stay entirely out of the news this summer. While his fellow superstars make noise about going overseas and his fellow point guards dominate the streetball circuit, there's been nary a peep from the NBA's reigning MVP.

We can only conclude that he's in a gym somewhere getting even more ridiculously good at basketball. Whenever Rose resurfaces and the NBA decides to get its act together and begin the 2011-2012 season, the Chicago Bulls All-Star point guard will be sporting a new model of his signature shoe from adidas.

SoleCollector.com has all the details on Rose's new sneaker: the adiZero Rose 2.0.  
Seen here are images of the launch colorway, which features a textured black leather upper, SprintWeb side paneling, red mesh underlay and metallic gold trim. Red takes care of the inner liner and white is used for 3-Stripe branding wrapped around the SprintFrame-supported heel. A white rubber outsole with a re-designed traction pattern finishes off the look below.
Take a look.

derrick-rose-shoe

The site reports that Rose's shoe will sell for $110 and is set to hit stores sometime in October.

Image via SoleCollector.com.
Posted on: July 27, 2011 8:37 pm
 

NBA lockout threatens 2012 USA Olympics team?

Posted by Ben Golliver

team-usa-2008

A dozen of America's top athletes leaping for joy after securing an Olympics gold medal while the foreign opponent huddles together with heasd bowed consoling themselves. You don't have to sport a tattoo of the American flag on your bicep to get a rise out of that scene.

Unfortunately, the NBA lockout hangs over all of basketball these days. And Yahoo! Sports reports that if the league cancels the entire 2011-2012 season it could jeopardize NBA player participation in the 2012 Summer Olympics. In other words, the scene pictured above from Beijing in 2008 might not be repeated in London.
In the doomsday scenario, where labor strife causes the cancellation of the 2011-12 NBA season, and the work stoppage drags into June and then July, there’s little, if no chance, the great American players could play in the Olympics. Team USA is too tied to the NBA – too much of a David Stern production – for the players to break ranks and play. In the post 9-11 world, that’s a tricky subject PR-wise for the players, but several union, USA Basketball and agent sources believe this worst-case labor scenario would cost Team USA its NBA stars.

As the managing director of USA Basketball, Jerry Colangelo answers to Stern, and the league – along with its ATM machine, Nike – has immense impact on the coaching staff and roster. How could the NBA allow its coaches – Team USA assistants Nate McMillan and Mike D’Antoni – to coach NBA players during a lockout? Still, that’s the worst-case scenario, but it’s one that USA Basketball will have to consider should the labor dispute push deep into the NBA season. In this instance, Team USA would have to field a team of American players who’ve built careers overseas, as well as D-League players, and perhaps a superior college superstar or two.

That would obviously put the USA at a serious disadvantage, especially because foreign-born NBA players would almost certainly compete in the Olympics, lockout or not. Teams like Spain, France and Argentina, to name three, could put more raw talent on the court than a mish-mashed USA roster. For perhaps the first time ever, USA would be an unquestioned underdog entering the tournament. That would be a terrible nightmare.

Let's just not think about it. Assuming the lockout is resolved and NBA players are willing and able to compete for their country, here are the 12 names and seven potential alternates for the the roster.
The USA has tended to play versatile, small ball line-ups in recent international competitions. It's unlikely they would add multiple new big men unless one of the 2008 team members decided not to come back. When in doubt, the mantra seems to be, add shooting, which could favor younger guards like Curry and Gordon, who both played on the 2010 World Championships team.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com