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Tag:Alabama
Posted on: December 12, 2011 8:26 pm
 

Report: Colorado State to hire Bama OC McElwain

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Colorado State has reportedly found its new head coach. According to the Denver Post, CSU will hire Jim McElwain, Alabama's offensive coordinator. The contract is estimated to be a five-year deal, worth $1.5 million per year. McElwain will replace Steve Fairchild, who was ousted earlier in December.

The deal represents a substantial step up in both salary and prestige for the 49-year-old McElwain; this will be his first head coaching gig at any level, as he worked his way through the collegiate assistant ranks after graduating. Additionally, McElwain's salary will be nearly tripled from the $510,000 per year he was making at Alabama

McElwain's Alabama offense has improved its standing in the SEC for every year that he's been there; in 2007, Nick Saban's first at the helm of Alabama and the year before McElwain arrived, the Tide was ranked seventh in the SEC in total offense; in his first year, it was sixth, followed by finishes at fourth, third, and second in the ensuing years. In the one year McElwain spent as Fresno State's offensive coordinator, the Bulldogs went 9-4 (6-2) with a win over Georgia Tech in the Humanitarian Bowl, scoring nearly 33 points per game in the process. In addition, the Crimson Tide has scored over 30 points per game on average in every season McElwain has been at the helm of the Alabama offense; the Tide has averaged 36 points a game this year.

Colorado State has not officially announced the hire at this point, but the Post says the school will announce the hire at a Tuesday press conference. Meanwhile, Izzy Gould of al.com has reported that Saban met with his coaching staff on Monday to discuss McElwain's departure.

Stay on top of all the latest coaching changes around the country and which coaches might be the best candidates to take over in the college football coaching carousel.

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Posted on: December 12, 2011 5:09 pm
 

Pro Football Weekly releases All-American team

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

And now for something not quite completely different, but almost: the Pro Football Weekly All-American team.

As you might expect, the criteria for making an NFL-driven media outlet's All-America team differs dramatically from making most others. In its statement announcing the team, the PFW writes that:

The team annually honors the most talented players in college football and is selected based on considerable feedback from NFL evaluators taking into consideration a player’s pure talent and contribution to his team. Unlike many other teams rewarding the best college football players, PFW places an extra premium on true talent and draft value in the selection process. However, participants are expected to have contributed for the bulk of the season, leaving off some talented prospects who were limited this season. Extra attention was paid to qualities such as toughness, competitiveness and work ethic.

The team:
Quarterback

Andrew Luck, Stanford
HONORABLE MENTION: Matt Barkley, USC, Robert Griffin III, Baylor

Running back

Trent Richardson, Alabama
HM: Montee Ball, Wisconsin, David Wilson, Virginia Tech

Fullback

Jay Prosch, Illinois
HM: Braden Wilson, Kansas State

Wide receivers

Sammy Watkins, Clemson
Kendall Wright, Baylor
HM: Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State, Michael Floyd, Notre Dame, Alshon Jeffery, South Carolina, Marvin McNutt, Iowa

Tight end

Coby Fleener, Stanford
HM: Tyler Eifert, Notre Dame, Dwayne Allen, Clemson

Offensive tackles

Matt Kalil, USC
Riley Reiff, Iowa
HM: Barrett Jones, Alabama, Taylor Lewan, Michigan, Zebrie Sanders, Florida State, Cordy Glenn, Georgia

Offensive guards

David DeCastro, Stanford
Kevin Zeitler, Wisconsin
HM: Chance Warmack, Alabama, Alvin Bailey, Arkansas

Center

Peter Konz, Wisconsin
HM: David Molk, Michigan, Ben Jones, Georgia

Defensive Ends

Sam Montgomery, LSU
Melvin Ingram, South Carolina
HM: Whitney Mercilus, Illinois, Barkevious Mingo, LSU, Vinny Curry, Marshall, Ronnell Lewis, Oklahoma

Defensive tackles

Fletcher Cox, Mississippi State
Devon Still, Penn State
HM: Michael Brockers, LSU, Brandon Thompson, Clemson, Josh Chapman, Alabama, Dontari Poe, Memphis

Inside linebacker

Dont’a Hightower, Alabama
HM: Luke Kuechly, Boston College, Lavonte David, Nebraska

Outside linebackers

Courtney Upshaw, Alabama
Jarvis Jones, Georgia
HM: Gerald Hodges, Penn State, Sean Spence, Miami (Fla.)

Cornerbacks

Morris Claiborne, LSU
Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama
HM: Tyrann Mathieu, LSU, Brodrick Brown, Oklahoma State, Leonard Johnson, Iowa State, David Amerson, North Carolina State

Safeties

Mark Barron, Alabama
T.J. McDonald, USC
HM: Markelle Martin, Oklahoma State, Bacarri Rambo, Georgia, Tony Jefferson, Oklahoma, John Boyett, Oregon

Placekicker

Randy Bullock, Texas A&M
HM: Caleb Sturgis, Florida

Punter

Steven Clark, Auburn
HM: Brad Wing, LSU

Return specialist

Joe Adams, Arkansas
HM: Taveon Rogers, New Mexico State
A few comments:

S-E-C! S-E-C! (D-E-F-E-N-S-E). Certainly the pro scouts don't think the SEC's reputation for defense is overblown; only two of their 11 first-team defenders hail from any other conference. They would also tend to lean towards Alabama over LSU when it comes to naming the nation's most talented defense; four Tide defenders make the first team to LSU's two, though three Tigers do make honorable mention (to the Tide's one).

But not offensively. Of course, the opposite is true on the other side of the ball, where Trent Richardson is the SEC's only first-team representative. Perhaps most surprising is that the league's offensive linemen are given such short shrift; instead four of the five first-team OLs hail from the Big Ten, including a pair from Wisconsin.

Sammy power.
Only two freshmen made the team at all, and only one landed on the first team: Clemson receiver Sammy Watkins, who doesn't boast prototypical NFL wideout size but has nonetheless clearly caught the eyes of the pro scouts.

Did the Ray Guy get that right? No. But maybe the award's decision to include Auburn sophomore punter Steven Clark over LSU's Brad Wing (the other freshman honoree) as one of three finalists makes a little more sense given that the pros favor Clark's towering moonshots over Wing's, well, better all-around productivity/statistics.

Major notoriety for mid-major players. Marshall's Vinny Curry has gotten some press, but you won't see many other All-American teams with players from Memphis and New Mexico State honored, we don't think. We'll take the scouts' word for it on Tiger tackle Dontari Poe and Aggie returner Taveon Rogers; congrats to them.
Posted on: December 12, 2011 4:05 pm
Edited on: December 12, 2011 4:06 pm
 

Arizona State interested in Whittingham

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Arizona State's search to replace Dennis Erickson has been an interesting one to follow. The school was originally in talks with, and made an offer to, Kevin Sumlin before those fell apart and Sumlin eventually ended up with Texas A&M. Then there was June Jones, who was actually being reported as the school's new head coach, but that deal fell apart at the last second as well.

So now Arizona State remains without a head coach while its conference mates like Washington State and Arizona have made big splash hires with Mike Leach and Rich Rodriguez. So where are the Sun Devils turning their attention to now?

Multiple reports have the school being interested in Utah's Kyle Whittingham. The Arizona Republic confirmed the interest on Monday.

Whittingham has been at Utah since 1994, moving up the ranks to become head coach in 2005 after some guy named Urban Meyer left to take a job at Florida. The Utes are 65-25 under Whittingham, including a 13-0 season in 2008 that ended with a 31-17 Sugar Bowl win over Alabama. However, Utah went 7-5 in its first season as a member of the Pac-12.

Whether Whittingham is interested in leaving Utah for Arizona State is a big question as well. He signed a 5-year contract worth $6 million following that Sugar Bowl victory, and still has two years left on the deal. So unless Arizona State is willing to offer a significant raise, I'm just not sure Arizona State is even much of a step up the coaching ladder for Whittingham, especially considering the history he has with the Utah program.
Posted on: December 12, 2011 3:26 pm
Edited on: December 12, 2011 3:42 pm
 

PODCAST: SEC Wrap-up

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

As many headlines as LSU and Alabama have hogged this season, has it really been another banner season for an SEC without quite as much of its usual offensive punch or nonconference success? Or have the Tigers and Tide overshadowed a league stil las deep as it's ever been? 

Adam Aizer
talks to our resident SEC blogger -- the one whose name is at the top of the post, natch -- about those questions and lots more as we wrap up the SEC's 2011 season. What's been the league's biggest surprise? Disappointment? Coach of the Year? Its best defense? And why did each team finish the way did--what went wrong, and what right? We cover it all in this edition of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast, which you can listen to by clicking below, downloading the mp3, or popping out the player in a new window.

Remember, all of the CBSSports.com College Football Podcasts can be downloaded for FREE from the iTunes Store. 


Posted on: December 10, 2011 9:44 pm
 

2011 Heisman Trophy voting numbers breakdown



Posted by Adam Jacobi

On Saturday night, the Heisman Trophy was awarded to Baylor junior quarterback Robert Griffin III. RG3, as he's known to Baylor faithful and now the rest of the nation, collected 405 first-place votes to finish with 1,687 total voting points, well ahead of the runner-up, Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck. Luck had 247 first-place votes and 1,407 total voting points.

The key to Griffin's victory in the voting was his performance in the South region -- Alabama RB Trent Richardson's home territory -- where RG3 led all contenders with 303 voting points. Richardson was second with 256 points there, and Luck was third with 182 points. That region alone accounted for nearly half of Griffin's margin of victory over Luck, and it helped stave Richardson off as a serious threat to winning the Heisman. Of course, Griffin also cleaned up in his home Southwest region, but it was his ability to win regions that he wasn't the home favorite of that landed RG3 the coveted Heisman.

Here's the final national vote ranking:

  1. Robert Griffin III, Baylor QB: 405 first-place votes, 1,687 total points
  2. Andrew Luck, Stanford QB: 247 first-place votes, 1,407 total points
  3. Trent Richardson, Alabama RB: 138 first-place votes, 978 total points
  4. Montee Ball, Wisconsin RB: 22 first-place votes, 348 total points
  5. Tyrann Mathieu, LSU DB: 34 first-place votes, 327 total points
  6. Matt Barkley, USC QB: 11 first-place votes, 153 total points
  7. Case Keenum, Houston QB: 10 first-place votes, 123 total points
  8. Kellen Moore, Boise State QB: 6 first-place votes, 90 total points
  9. Russell Wilson, Wisconsin QB: 4 first-place votes, 52 total points
  10. LaMichael James, Oregon RB: 5 first-place votes, 48 total points

And here are the regional breakdowns:

FAR WEST (Alaska, Arizona, California, Hawaii, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, North Dakota, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah, Washington, Wyoming)

  1. Luck: 315 points
  2. Griffin: 220 points
  3. Richardson: 137 points

MID-ATLANTIC (Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, Virginia, West Virginia)

  1. Griffin: 254 points
  2. Luck: 248 points
  3. Richardson: 168 points

MIDWEST (Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio, Wisconsin)

  1. Griffin: 272 points
  2. Luck: 220 points
  3. Richardson: 125 points

NORTHEAST (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont)

  1. Griffin: 257 points
  2. Luck: 254 points
  3. Richardson: 160 points 

SOUTH (Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Tennessee) 

  1. Griffin: 303 points
  2. Richardson: 256 points
  3. Luck: 182 points

SOUTHWEST (Arkansas, Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas)

  1. Griffin: 381 points
  2. Luck: 188 points
  3. Richardson: 132 points
Posted on: December 10, 2011 1:38 pm
Edited on: December 10, 2011 1:39 pm
 

FWAA releases 2011 All-American Team

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The Football Writers Association of America (FWAA) announced its 68th annual All-America team on Sunday. The list is headlined by Heisman favorite Robert Griffin III of Baylor, and top-ranked LSU put three defenders on the team this year. Alabama, who is set to face LSU in the BCS Championship Game, leads all schools with five FWAA All-Americans. Here's this year's roster in full:

Offense

QB Robert Griffin III, Baylor
RB Montee Ball, Wisconsin
RB Trent Richardson, Alabama
WR Justin Blackmon, Oklahoma State
WR Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma
TE Dwayne Allen, Clemson
OL Levy Adcock, Oklahoma State
OL David DeCastro, Stanford
OL Barrett Jones, Alabama
OL Nate Potter, Boise State
C David Molk, Michigan

Defense

DL Vinny Curry, Marshall
DL Whitney Mercilus, Illinois
DL Sam Montgomery, LSU
DL Devon Still, Penn State
LB Jarvis Jones, Georgia
LB Luke Kuechly, Boston College
LB Courtney Upshaw, Alabama
DB Mark Barron, Alabama
DB Morris Claiborne, LSU
DB Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama
DB Tyrann Mathieu, LSU

Special Teams

K Quinn Sharp, Oklahoma State
P Bobby Cowan, Idaho
RS Joe Adams, Arkansas

Anyone get left out? Tell us who you think got snubbed by the FWAA at the official Eye On College Football Facebook page. 

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
  
Posted on: December 9, 2011 6:00 pm
Edited on: December 9, 2011 6:06 pm
 

Report: Muschamp "targeting" Mike Shula for OC

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

In the wake of Charlie Weis's stunning departure for Kansas, Florida head coach Will Muschamp vowed that he would hire " the best offensive coordinator in the country." We're not sure the first name to bubble up as a serious candidate quite fits that bill.

From the Twitter feed of Gainesville Sun reporter Robbie Andrieu:



As a coach who's spent his entire career in the NFL with the exception of his largely ill-fated tenure in charge at Alabama, Shula certainly fits Muschamp's bill as a coordinator with pro experience who'd run a pro-style system in Gainesville. And he might quietly become a solid recruiter for the Gators as well; despite his struggles in Tuscaloosa, many of the players he brought to the Tide formed the foundation of the 26-2 2008 and 2009 teams, and he very nearly landed a Florida product you may have heard of named Tim Tebow.

But that's just about where the good news ends. Shula has only spent four seasons of his career as an offensive coordinator, all of them at the pro level with the Tampa Bay Buccaneers; in those four seasons, the Bucs landed in the league's bottom three three times and were never better than 22nd.

He didn't appear to do much for the Tide's offense during his Alabama stint, either. His four years there never produced an offense that ranked in the top half of the FBS, and the Tide's average rank in total offense during his tenure was a mediocre 76th.

Currently, Shula is serving as the Carolina Panthers quarterbacks coach after holding the same position for the Jacksonville Jaguars the past three seasons. Cam Newton is having a nice season under his tutelage, but is that reason enough for Muschamp to bite? Is his prior resume? We're not seeing it, which is why if we were a Gator fan, we'd be hoping Muschamp eventually wound up targeting some other candidate.
Posted on: December 9, 2011 2:27 pm
Edited on: December 9, 2011 2:29 pm
 

Fischer's Heisman vote: RGIII, Luck, Moore



Posted by Bryan Fischer


Earlier this year, I was given the prestigious honor of voting for the Heisman Trophy for the first time. The award's illustrious history of selecting the country's most outstanding player has been well chronicled and I was happy to lend my expertise. As the weeks went by however, it became clear that this would be among the most difficult votes in some time - there was no runaway favorite like Cam Newton this year.

There did seem to be some resolution towards the end of the season but, in talking with other voters, it became clear that there was no easy pick. After sitting down and looking at stats, highlights and other things, who to vote number one became pretty clear. It was spots two and three (you only have three spots on your ballot) that caused me the most angst. Without further ado, my Heisman ballot and why I voted for them.

1. Robert Griffin III, quarterback, Baylor

Like my colleague Bruce Feldman, it's difficult to wrap your head around the fact that a player from Baylor is the most outstanding player in college football. I grew up in Texas and it always seemed the Bears were the ones everybody scheduled for homecoming. Thanks to the Big 12 television deal they were rarely on television unless they were playing a major school. Baylor, for most college football fans across the country, was irrelevant before Griffin burst onto the scene.

During September, the nation was transfixed on what, exactly, RGIII was doing but figured he couldn't keep it up. The first three games he was completing 85% of his passes, had 13 touchdown passes and no picks and flirted with a touchdown-incompletion ratio that was unheard of. The opener against No. 14 TCU was Baylor's first win over a ranked team since 2004 and the signal-caller was the chief reason why. Many expected the close loss to Kansas State to end any hopes of him making it to New York but in the deepest league in the country (sorry SEC fans), Griffin won nine games despite the Bears defense being ranked in the 100's in most major defensive categories. Safe to say that without RGIII, the Bears would have been 3-9.

What sealed the deal for me was the game-winning drive to beat Oklahoma for the first time in school history and an efficient game against what was the 9th-best defense in the country at the time in Texas to end the year. It's rare for any player in the conference to beat both schools but RGIII did accomplish the rare feat. He finished first in the country in passing efficiency with what would be an NCAA record 192.31 rating, edging out Russell Wilson despite attempting 85 more passes. He also finished second in the country in total offense and led the nation in points responsible for.

In January, Griffin was invited to speak at the NCAA convention in San Antonio by new president Mark Emmert. He was lauded for his achievements outside athletics such as getting a degree in three years and beginning his masters' with sights set on law school not his backup plan to the NFL, but his primary one. The attention and applause were genuine on that chilly day at the convention, just as it should be Saturday in New York City when he likely accepts the Heisman Trophy. On and off the field this year, Robert Griffin III was my pick for the most outstanding college football player.

2. Andrew Luck, quarterback, Stanford

He was supposed to be a shoe-in for this award. For most of the year, it looked like he wouldn't lose the Heisman, even if he didn't necessarily win it. I saw Luck up close several times this season and can confirm that he's the best quarterback in college football. He throws on the run better than anybody, his pocket awareness is uncanny, he calls his own plays and - like RGIII - has taken a program lacking success and turned it into a winner.

The Cardinal are 23-2 over the past two seasons and that is almost entirely due to Luck. Unfortunately his worst game of the year came when he needed it most, against Oregon. Even then, he threw for three touchdowns and the team was in things for three quarters. The offense scored fewer than 30 points just once all year - against Notre Dame when they could have topped the mark had they tried - and was more balanced than any other in the country as coaches had no issues sticking to running the ball if it was working.

A lot of people turn the Heisman race into a stats race. Luck's were good (3,170 yards passing, 35 touchdowns, 9 interceptions) but didn't top others. The thing I always kept in mind was what he did given the talent around him. Sure he had a good offensive line, so did Trent Richardson, Montee Ball, Wilson and Griffin. Nobody, however, put up the kind of numbers Luck did throwing to three tight ends who didn't have separation speed and with his best wide receiver sitting on the sidelines the second half of the year. Griffin had the dynamic Kendall Wright, Luck had Griff Whalen. That was a factor in my mind.

By all measures, he was outstanding this season but fell just short of being the most outstanding player in college football. He put up more points against USC in that school's history (against some defensive coordinator name Monte Kiffin) and had he had good defense, might be playing for the national title. He is the only quarterback ever to go undefeated against USC and Notre Dame. Listen to head coach David Shaw state his case for the quarterback and you can't help but consider him worthy of this award. I couldn't put him above RGIII so Luck wound up second on my ballot.

3. Kellen Moore, quarterback, Boise State

For many seeing this, the thought is that I gave Moore the third spot as a career achievement award. I did not.

For most of the week leading up to voting I had a running back (Ball or Richardson) penciled in.  But before I was making my choices I looked again at what the diminutive but excellent quarterback had done this year. Statistically he was great: 300-of-405 passing (74%), 3,507 yards, 41 touchdowns and seven picks. I watched a lot of Boise State games this year (even the blowouts) and know that most of the numbers were accomplished in three quarters or less. A great season was hampered by the loss to TCU but it's safe to say that Moore did all he could game-in and game-out to lead the Broncos to another top 10 ranking.

Moore's best strength this year was spreading the ball around. He lost his two best receivers from last season but didn't lose a step despite several of his young pass catchers dealing with drops from time-to-time. The running game wasn't as good but Moore made up for it through the air. Were it not for a one-point loss to a good team, he'd be in New York this year.

There were three things that caused me to put the quarterback on my ballot ahead of others however. The first was just the way he played. He's good as much as every person in the country likes to knock him for the competition he faces. He'd be the best quarterback in most power conferences, easily, and can drop the ball in on downfield routes perfectly. Second, he became the NCAA's all-time, winningest quarterback at the FBS level. How is that not outstanding? There's no knocking a winner, which Moore rightfully is. Finally, as a starting quarterback Moore has never trailed by more than seven points his entire career. Never. The combined margin of defeat in his three losses total is just five points. Those are just jaw-dropping stats and a measure of someone who not only starts good but doesn't panic if put into a difficult situation.

Moore was great this season and if you sort through it all, you'd see that too.

Why I didn't vote for them (in the order I would have)

Montee Ball, running back, Wisconsin: Ball was on my ballot for the stretch run but fell just short after considering Moore. He led the country in rushing with 1,759 yards and in scoring with 17.54 points per game. His 38 touchdowns is just one shy of Barry Sanders' record and more than 45 entire teams. It hurt that Russell Wilson was the man Wisconsin picked to campaign for earlier in the year but Ball without a doubt had a season to remember and was an outstanding college football player in 2011.

Matt Barkley, quarterback, USC: I wanted to put Barkley in my top three because he has not only been outstanding on the field leading USC back to the top 10, but he has been the face of the program that was put through the ringer. He set a school and conference record for touchdown passes in a season and tossed six TDs in a game twice. It was a season for the ages but he was hampered by a very slow start to the year, the Arizona State game and the head-to-head loss to Luck.

Trent Richardson, running back, Alabama: He was the best offensive player in the SEC and a great player who I'd want on my team in a heartbeat but I didn't think Richardson was the best running back in the country. He played only four games against schools with a winning record and faced just two defenses ranked in the top 40 against the rush. 46% of his yards came against North Texas, Ole Miss, Georgia Southern and Auburn and nearly the same percentage of his touchdowns came against those four defensive powerhouses. I get that he was hurt at times and shared carries; Richardson is a great player but just wasn't the best this season.

Tyrann Mathieu, cornerback, LSU: I love the Honey Badger - he's a game changer unlike any other in the way he forces turnovers and returns kicks. That said, he wasn't the most outstanding player on his own team (punter Brad Wing was) and wasn't even the best player in the secondary (Morris Claiborne was). His coverage skills were solid but not spectacular and had he not had two big games against Arkansas and Georgia to end the season, wouldn't have been invited to New York. The suspension during the season also played a factor.

Others under consideration: Case Keenum, Houston; LaMichael James, Oregon; Brandon Weeden, Oklahoma State.

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com