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Tag:Joe Paterno
Posted on: April 16, 2011 3:56 pm
Edited on: April 16, 2011 7:55 pm
 

JoePa won't name starting QB till fall

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

With Rob Bolden having asked for a release from his scholarship and his mother refusing this week to rule out a second such request before the 2011 season, you might have expected the Nittany Lions to either name Bolden their starter (and likely guarantee his presence in State College this fall) or name rival Matt McGloin the man and put the QB controversy behind them.

But Joe Paterno and his staff have never cared much for what other people might expect, which is why Paterno on Saturday said no decision would be made on the starting quarterback position until later this year.

As for what that might mean for Bolden, Paterno said he expects him to stay. But even he's not saying for certain, as the Patriot-News reports:
When asked if he would name a starting quarterback after practices and the spring game, Paterno said, “No need to. No sense in doing it.

“…I would say I’m 99 percent sure it’s going to be one of the two kids (Bolden and McGloin).”

Paterno reiterated his belief that Bolden will stay and says the sophomore has looked happy in practice. Paterno plans to meet with Bolden next week about a final decision.
Paterno didn't mince words about the other quarterbacks in the competition, saying redshirt freshman Paul Jones " has to work his way into" McGloin and Bolden's comfort level and former heir apparent Kevin Newsome is sometimes "the last guy to the practice field."

But it's not news that the decision is down to McGloin and Bolden. It's the next headline -- either that Bolden has chosen to move on, or that he's chosen to stay, or who exactly is the starter -- that will be the one that might define the Nittany Lions' season.

And oh, about that spring game: McGloin threw the only touchdown pass in a weather-marred 10-0 "win" for Blue over White. The game was called just a couple of minutes into the second half due to rain.

Posted on: April 14, 2011 3:11 pm
 

Eye on CFB Recruiting Review, 4/14

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Once a week, our Eye on College Football Recruiting Review recaps the past week's top headlines from our sister blog, Bryan Fischer's Eye on Recruiting . Enjoy:

  • Though the long-simmering Delvon Simmons saga won't be officially over until he enrolls in Lubbock, the 2011 top-10 defensive tackle (and former North Carolina signee) has announced that he'll be joining Texas Tech this fall. After his departure from the UNC fold, Simmons listened to overtures from programs like USC, Auburn and Oregon but has settled on the Red Raiders.
  • Iowa dipped into Illinois for their first commitment of the class of 2012, offensive line legacy recruit Mitch Keppy. Also going out-of-state -- but much further out-of-state -- was West Virginia, who used Dana Holgorsen's old Lone Star State connections to land Houston quarterback Ford Childress. 
  • Les Miles told new LSU cornerback commitment Dwayne Thomas that getting the New Orleans prospect in the fold was like "getting Tyrann Mathieu all over again." Given the sky-high expectations for Mathieu this season, it seems Miles is more than a little high on Thomas's potential. Staying in the SEC, South Carolina received their second pledge for 2012 in the person of Atlanta-area linebacker T.J. Holloman, who took the Gamecocks over N.C. State and Louisville.
  • The slow start to the class of 2011 is ancient history for Penn State as the Nittany Lions have been racking up major commitments recently. The first of two this week was Westville (N.J.) defensive tackle Jamil Pollard, who accepted the Nittany Lions' offer over those from such heavyweights as Alabama and Florida and in-state Rutgers. But Joe Paterno and Co. landed an equally big prize Tuesday when five-star defensive tackle Jarron Jones of Rochester (N.Y.) also committed to PSU. Jones said he would take his allotment of official visits all the same, but if his commitment (and Pollard's) sticks, the Nittany Lions will be automatic entrants in the race for the best defensive line class of 2012.
  • Sophomores can't even receive written offers just yet, but Prattville (Ala.) offensive lineman Austin Gholson decided he didn't want to wait, committing to Florida State after a recent visit. Gholson is, not surprisingly, FSU's first commitment for the class of 2013 and is expected to be one of the top prospects in Alabama in his class.
  • Few Michigan State players in recent memory have made the impact of departed running back Javon Ringer, but that won't stop his nephew Kaleb Ringer from committing to Michigan on his birthday tomorrow. Kaleb is a linebacker prospect from Clayton (Ohio) with offers from Iowa, Louisville, and others as well as the Wolverines.
  • Injuries at summer combines are unfortunate enough, but a life-threatening head injury must be the worst-case scenario. Sadly, that's the scenario that played out for D.C. area receiver Lamont Baldwin, who suffered a fractured skull and severe concussion after a camp collision. A highly-sought after recruit with offers from ACC heavy-hitters like Miami and North Carolina, Baldwin is expected to recover within six months.
One more reminder: if you don't want to wait for these recaps, simply read Eye on Recruiting . You'll be glad you did.
Posted on: March 31, 2011 5:02 pm
 

Former PSU DC Sandusky facing grand jury

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Jerry Sandusky spent 32 years on the sidelines at Penn State, and was once considered to be Joe Paterno's eventual successor at the school before he retired in 1999 as the team's defensive coordinator. Now, over eleven years removed from the game, Sandusky is the subject of a grand jury investigation. According to The Patriot-News, Sandusky has been the subject of the investigation for 18 months, as he's been accused of indecently assaulting a teenage boy.
According to five people with knowledge of the case, a grand jury meeting in Harrisburg has been hearing testimony for at least 18 months about the allegation, which was made in 2009 by a 15-year-old from Clinton County.
The teen told authorities that Sandusky had inappropriate contact with him over a four-year period, starting when he was 10.
Penn State coach Joe Paterno, athletic director Tim Curley and retired university Vice President and Treasurer Gary Schultz were among those who appeared before the grand jury in January at the attorney general’s Strawberry Square office complex, according to a person with knowledge of the investigation. Attempts to reach the three for comment were unsuccessful.
It is not clear whether university President Graham Spanier has testified and he declined comment on the matter when questioned earlier this week.
After leaving Penn State, Sandusky spent the next 11 years running The Second Mile, a non-profit organization that deals with 10,000 Pennsylvania youths by offering summer and year-round camps. Sandusky stepped down from the charity last fall to spend more time with his family and handle personal matters.

The allegations from the 15-year old boy surfaced in 2009, when Sandusky was an assistant football coach at Central Mountain High School. It was there that the boy alleged Sandusky touched him inappropriately while they were alone in the gym.
Posted on: March 31, 2011 2:43 pm
Edited on: March 31, 2011 3:09 pm
 

Kevin Newsome: PSU QB by day, rap star by night

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Penn State has a tough task in front of it this spring, deciding a first-string quarterback between 2010 part-time starters Matt McGloin and Rob Bolden, with sophomore Kevin Newsome firmly in the mix as well. There's been little indication as to who will win the job on a permanent basis, and for all we know, the question won't be decided until the summer months.

If, however, the quarterback race is so tight that it comes down to a rap battle -- look, stick with me here, it's just an "if" -- then it appears Newsome might have the upper hand. Oh, it probably won't come down to that, because I can't even imagine what Joe Paterno thinks about rap music, but hypothetically speaking, Newsome is prepared here.

PSU fan site Bro Paterno posted a couple songs of Newsome's (or, as he prefers to call himself on the mic, "NewNew"*) yesterday.


This one, "I'm Cool," has an isolated instance of race-based profanity (you can probably figure it out), so by rule the audio is NSFW, but by and large the language is better than with most rap songs. And we've got to say, it's not that bad. It's not that good, either, but at the very least the beat is decent and it's not horrible toward women. So, y'know, there's that.

There's one other song on the link above: "Set You Apart," which is more "inspirational," if we had to put a word to it. Another fitting word would be "slow." As for this one, it's obvious Newsome's heart was in the right place, and the world could use more positivity in general, but the song's not very good. I know, it's shocking that a 20-year-old athlete isn't a dynamite music producer yet, but still: this left me wanting.

All in all, he's at least got a fine ear for music, and we've definitely heard worse from athletes over the years. Remember Kobe Bryant's rap career? With that one song where he was all "let's put Tyra Banks in this too"? Stunning that his rap career never got off the ground. So keep trying, NewNew -- you'll be better than Kobe in no time! You pretty much already are!

*Am I the only one who hears "New-New" and thinks of making guitar solo noises? Just me?

Posted on: February 28, 2011 11:24 am
Edited on: February 28, 2011 11:28 am
 

Rob Bolden still uncertain about future at PSU

Posted by Chip Patterson

Penn State freshman quarterback Rob Bolden had high hopes for his career with the Nittany Lions when he was named the starter heading into his first collegiate game.  Then, at 18, Bolden was the first true-freshman quarterback to start a season opener in Joe Paterno's 45 years as a head coach.  But after getting knocked out of the Minnesota game with a concussion on October 23, Bolden struggled on the field and failed to regain his starting position from backup quarterback Matt McGloin.  

Bolden requested a transfer after the Nittany Lions' Outback Bowl loss to Florida, and head coach Joe Paterno refused to release the quarterback from his scholarship.  Now, being forced to stay on campus at least until the end of the spring semester, Bolden must try and make the best of the situation.  Recently, Bolden spoke on the issue while making a team appearance at a charity event.  While Bolden's future at Penn State is still uncertain, he is making the most of his time in Happy Valley.

“There is no definite answer on if I'm gonna stay or if I'm gonna leave,” Bolden said during an Uplifting Athletes' event at Damon's Grill in State College Sunday. “We're just gonna wait it out, see what happens in the spring and go from there.

“I've been just fine,” he said. “I'm having fun. I'm with my teammates. That hasn't changed at all. We still love each other, they're still my guys. I'm here for the spring, (so) we'll ball up and go from there.”

If Penn State fans are hoping that Bolden will stay for the fall, one hopeful sign is that he has been spending time with former Nittany Lions quarterback Daryll Clark.  Clark befriended Bolden when he was an instructor at an Elite 11 camp two years ago.  Clark has been spending time breaking down tape of the 2010 season with the young quarterback, helping him identify improvements Bolden can make to his  game.

“I need to work on everything,” Bolden said. “My whole game needs to be bumped up. My freshman year, I got that out of the way. It was cool to get some snaps under my belt, learn from that, move on (and) don't make the same mistakes twice.”

Bolden beat out McGloin for the starting position coming into the 2010 season, and depending on how things go in spring ball he could find himself doing it again in 2011.  Paterno has not make any declarations on the status of the job, but my guess would be the position will create some great competition between the two signal-callers in the coming weeks.

H/T: Fight On State  

Posted on: February 17, 2011 5:32 pm
 

JoePa's tie sells for $10,200

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Make no mistake about it, college football fans in the SEC own the lion's share of the market on crazy. We don't have to look past the events of the past few days in which an Alabama fan poisoned the trees at Auburn's Toomer's Corner to realize that. Even without such shenanigans, listen to 20 minutes of Paul Finebaum's show any weekday and the insanity will make it's presence known.

That being said, the SEC doesn't hold a monopoly in crazy. There are crazy college football fans all over the country. From the Washington State season-ticket holder, to the guy who pays over $10,000 for a tie that Joe Paterno once wore.
The necktie worn by Penn State coach Joe Paterno the night he won his 400th game has turned into one expensive article of clothing.
The brownish-red tie with paisley prints was auctioned off for $10,200 at a charity event last week for Penn State Public Broadcasting. JoePa wore the tie with a light blue dress shirt under a black Nittany Lions jacket on Nov. 6, when his team rallied from three touchdowns down to beat Northwestern 35-21 at Beaver Stadium.
See? People in the Big Ten are insane too. Even if they're only insane for charity.

Of course, had this been Nick Saban's tie, then an Auburn fan would have paid $40,000 for it, soaked it in gasoline and then lit Bryant-Denny Stadium on fire with it. 
Posted on: January 31, 2011 7:10 pm
 

How important is a coach's age to winning titles?

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The Virginia Tech-centric blog Gobbler Country posted an interested study today, examining the breakdown of championship-winning coaches' ages in the modern era of college football. The question raised is "how old is too old," and excepting some obvious outliers, the answer is "younger than you think."

For the champions, I used the BCS from 1998-present, the coaches' poll from 1982-1997 and the AP poll from 1960-1981.

Time span Avg. Age
1960-69 46.4
1970-79 51.0
1980-89 48.6
1990-99 55.6
2000-10 49.9
BCS Era 55.1
1960-2010 51.3

The ages of head coaches have fluctuated from mid 40s to mid 50s since 1960, but the average has been a little over 51 years of age. However, there has been one coach that has helped break the curve. Take away Bobby Bowden's two titles and the average in the 90's shrinks to 52.8 and the BCS era shrinks to 53.8.

What's even more unsettling to programs with older coaches is the breakdown of championships by age bracket:

Age Span Champs
< 40 5
40-44 9
45-49 9
50-54 14
55-59 9
60 + 5

Not only is there a precipitous dropoff from the early 50s to 60+, those five titles were won by just three coaches: The aforementioned Bowden with two, Bear Bryant with two, and Joe Paterno -- the three most celebrated coaches of the modern era of I-A football. What's more, Bryant had won his first title at the age of 50, while Paterno won his first at 56. Bowden didn't win his first until he was 64, but that was after six straight top-five finishes in the final poll for Florida State. In other words, each of those three coaches firmly established his national championship bona fides before his 60th birthday, while every other coach who ever hit 60 in the last 50 years was quite evidently past his prime.

It's not really surprising, then, to have seen Maryland jettison longtime head coach Ralph Friedgen, who was 63 at the end of the 2010 and who clearly wasn't about to win a title at such a mediocre football school (no offense, Terps, but let's be honest). Incoming coach Randy Edsall will have just turned 53 at the outset of the 2011 season, and while one might joke that Maryland's only got two seasons of Edsall in his prime before it all goes downhill, it's not as if he's got 15 years in front of him with the Terrapins.

So with all this in mind, here are a few more notable coaches and their ages as of the start of the 2011 season. It would be incorrect to say there's a "new generation" of coaches on the move (seven years or so doesn't really constitute a generational gap) but it's pretty clear that a few of these guys aren't lasting much more than five years -- especially if they're not winning 10 games a year anymore.

Frank Beamer, Virginia Tech, 64
Mack Brown, Texas, 60
Gene Chizik, Auburn, 49
Kirk Ferentz, Iowa, 56
Al Golden, Miami, 42
Mike Gundy, Oklahoma State, a man, 44
Brady Hoke, Michigan, 52
Brian Kelly, Notre Dame, 49
Chip Kelly, Oregon, 47
Lane Kiffin, USC, 36
Mike Leach, free agent, 50
Les Miles, LSU, 57
Dan Mullen, Mississippi St., 39
Will Muschamp, Florida, 40
Joe Paterno, Penn State, 84
Gary Patterson, TCU, 51
Bo Pelini, Nebraska, 43
Chris Petersen, Boise State, 46
Bobby Petrino, Arkansas, 50
Mark Richt, Georgia, 51
Nick Saban, Alabama, 59
Bob Stoops, Oklahoma, 50
Jim Tressel, Ohio State, 58
Kyle Whittingham, Utah, 51

Now obviously, not all of these schools are going to win national championships in the next 5-10 years. But by and large, most of these schools do pay their coaches a gigantic salary -- to the point that the expectation of competing on a national level is inevitable. If a coach is struggling in his fourth or fifth year with a program, is an athletic director going to be more apt to fire the coach if he's 57 instead of 47? Is that age discrimination, or common sense?

Posted on: January 31, 2011 7:10 pm
 

How important is a coach's age to winning titles?

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The Virginia Tech-centric blog Gobbler Country posted an interested study today, examining the breakdown of championship-winning coaches' ages in the modern era of college football. The question raised is "how old is too old," and excepting some obvious outliers, the answer is "younger than you think."

For the champions, I used the BCS from 1998-present, the coaches' poll from 1982-1997 and the AP poll from 1960-1981.

Time span Avg. Age
1960-69 46.4
1970-79 51.0
1980-89 48.6
1990-99 55.6
2000-10 49.9
BCS Era 55.1
1960-2010 51.3

The ages of head coaches have fluctuated from mid 40s to mid 50s since 1960, but the average has been a little over 51 years of age. However, there has been one coach that has helped break the curve. Take away Bobby Bowden's two titles and the average in the 90's shrinks to 52.8 and the BCS era shrinks to 53.8.

What's even more unsettling to programs with older coaches is the breakdown of championships by age bracket:

Age Span Champs
< 40 5
40-44 9
45-49 9
50-54 14
55-59 9
60 + 5

Not only is there a precipitous dropoff from the early 50s to 60+, those five titles were won by just three coaches: The aforementioned Bowden with two, Bear Bryant with two, and Joe Paterno -- the three most celebrated coaches of the modern era of I-A football. What's more, Bryant had won his first title at the age of 50, while Paterno won his first at 56. Bowden didn't win his first until he was 64, but that was after six straight top-five finishes in the final poll for Florida State. In other words, each of those three coaches firmly established his national championship bona fides before his 60th birthday, while every other coach who ever hit 60 in the last 50 years was quite evidently past his prime.

It's not really surprising, then, to have seen Maryland jettison longtime head coach Ralph Friedgen, who was 63 at the end of the 2010 and who clearly wasn't about to win a title at such a mediocre football school (no offense, Terps, but let's be honest). Incoming coach Randy Edsall will have just turned 53 at the outset of the 2011 season, and while one might joke that Maryland's only got two seasons of Edsall in his prime before it all goes downhill, it's not as if he's got 15 years in front of him with the Terrapins.

So with all this in mind, here are a few more notable coaches and their ages as of the start of the 2011 season. It would be incorrect to say there's a "new generation" of coaches on the move (seven years or so doesn't really constitute a generational gap) but it's pretty clear that a few of these guys aren't lasting much more than five years -- especially if they're not winning 10 games a year anymore.

Frank Beamer, Virginia Tech, 64
Mack Brown, Texas, 60
Gene Chizik, Auburn, 49
Kirk Ferentz, Iowa, 56
Al Golden, Miami, 42
Mike Gundy, Oklahoma State, a man, 44
Brady Hoke, Michigan, 52
Brian Kelly, Notre Dame, 49
Chip Kelly, Oregon, 47
Lane Kiffin, USC, 36
Mike Leach, free agent, 50
Les Miles, LSU, 57
Dan Mullen, Mississippi St., 39
Will Muschamp, Florida, 40
Joe Paterno, Penn State, 84
Gary Patterson, TCU, 51
Bo Pelini, Nebraska, 43
Chris Petersen, Boise State, 46
Bobby Petrino, Arkansas, 50
Mark Richt, Georgia, 51
Nick Saban, Alabama, 59
Bob Stoops, Oklahoma, 50
Jim Tressel, Ohio State, 58
Kyle Whittingham, Utah, 51

Now obviously, not all of these schools are going to win national championships in the next 5-10 years. But by and large, most of these schools do pay their coaches a gigantic salary -- to the point that the expectation of competing on a national level is inevitable. If a coach is struggling in his fourth or fifth year with a program, is an athletic director going to be more apt to fire the coach if he's 57 instead of 47? Is that age discrimination, or common sense?

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com