Tag:Mississippi State
Posted on: July 14, 2011 12:38 pm
Edited on: July 14, 2011 12:50 pm
 

Coaches' preseason All-SEC team released

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

We haven't felt like joining in the "wow, college football is really close!" chorus that's popped up as SEC Media Days creeps closer and various media guides across the land have landed in various media mailboxes. With more than half of July and all of August still to cross before we finally reach the promised land, we remain more depressed about the relative closeness of the season than excited.

But maybe, just maybe, it's closer than we think. That's our reaction to the news that the coaches' preseason All-SEC team has already been released. (That, and that the league's coaches sure don't think much of the Tennessee offense.)

A few notes before we get to the teams:
  • Arkansas leads the league with 14 total players honored, but not surprisingly it's Alabama with the most first-team selections, with seven.
  • More intriguingly, the team with the second-most first-team players? Georgia, including (as expected) the conference's first-team quarterback in Aaron Murray. Notably, though, none of those six play defense; lineman DeAngelo Tyson and corner Brandon Boykin were named second-team.
  • We don't have a whole lot of gripes with the selections, though we'd personally take outstanding Vanderbilt corner Casey Hayward over South Carolina's Stephon Gilmore for the first team. While big and physical, Gilmore was vulnerable to getting beaten deep, a big part of the Gamecocks' 10th-place conference finish in both overall pass defense and opponent's QB rating.
  • There's likely to be a lot more griping out of Knoxville, though, after zero Volunteers made any of the three offensive teams. There are cases to be made for running back Taurean Poole, offensive lineman JaWuan James and James Stone, and quarterback Tyler Bray, but the player with the biggest complaint is likely sophomore receiver Justin Hunter. Hunter only caught 16 balls last year, but seven of them went for touchdowns as he averaged an eye-popping 26 yards per reception. With the Vols' three leading receivers from a year ago all graduated, Hunter seems poised for a huge season.
  • It wasn't long ago the SEC was actually somewhat devoid of bellcow running backs. (In 2006, for instance, no player outside of the Darren McFadden-Felix Jones tag-team at Arkansas topped 1,000 yards.) That's not the case this season -- how often do you see the league's leading returning rusher (the Hogs' Knile Davis) consigned to second-team, or a player with 20 rushing touchdowns (Mississippi State's Vick Ballard) dropped all the way to third?
And without further ado, the teams:

OFFENSE

First-Team Offense

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
TE Orson Charles, Georgia 6-3 241 Jr. Tampa, Fla.
OL Cordy Glenn, Georgia 6-5 348 Sr. Riverdale, Ga.
OL Barrett Jones, Alabama 6-5 311 Jr. Memphis, Tenn.
OL Bradley Sowell, Ole Miss 6-7 315 Sr. Hernando, Miss.
OL Larry Warford, Kentucky 6-3 340 Jr. Richmond, Ky.
C Williams Vlachos, Alabama 6-1 294 Sr. Mountain Brook, Ala.
WR Greg Childs, Arkansas 6-3 217 Sr. Warren, Ark.
WR Alshon Jeffery, South Carolina 6-4 233 Jr. St. Matthews, S.C.
QB Aaron Murray, Georgia 6-1 211 So. Tampa, Fla.
RB Marcus Lattimore, South Carolina 6-0 231 So. Duncan, S.C.
RB Trent Richardson, Alabama 5-11 224 Jr. Pensacola, Fla.

Second-Team Offense

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
TE Brandon Barden, Vanderbilt 6-5 345 Sr. Lincolnton, Ga.
OL Alvin Bailey, Arkansas 6-5 319 So. Broken Arrow, Okla.
OL D.J. Fluker, Alabama 6-6 335 So. Foley, Ala.
OL Brandon Mosley, Auburn 6-6 306 Sr. Jefferson, Ga.
OL Rokevious Watkins, South Carolina 6-4 334 Sr. Fairburn, Ga.
C Ben Jones, Georgia 6-3 316 Sr. Centreville, Ala.
WR Joe Adams, Arkansas 5-11 190 Sr. Little Rock, Ark.
WR Rueben Randle, LSU 6-4 210 Jr. Bastrop, La.
QB Stephen Garcia, South Carolina 6-2 230 Sr. Lutz, Fla.
RB Knile Davis, Arkansas 6-0 230 Jr. Missouri City, Texas
RB Jeff Demps, Florida 5-8 190 Sr. Winter Garden, Fla.
RB Mike Dyer, Auburn 5-9 206 So. Little Rock, Ark.

Third-Team Offense

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
TE Philip Lutzenkirchen, Auburn 6-4 253 Jr. Marietta, Ga.
OL Grant Cook, Arkansas 6-4 318 Sr. Jonesboro, Ark.
OL Alex Hurst, LSU 6-6 329 Jr. Bartlett, Tenn.
OL Bobby Massie, Ole Miss 6-6 325 Jr. Lynchburg, Va.
OL Kyle Nunn, South Carolina 6-5 296 Sr. Sumter, NC
C Travis Swanson, Arkansas 6-5 305 So. Kingwood, Texas
WR Emory Blake, Auburn 6-1 197 Jr. Austin, Texas
WR Marquis Maze, Alabama 5-10 180 Sr. Birmingham, Ala.
WR Jarius Wright, Arkansas 5-10 180 Sr. Warren, Ark.
QB Chris Relf, Mississippi State 6-4 245 Sr. Montgomery, Ala.
RB Vick Ballard, Mississippi State 5-11 220 Sr. Pascagoula, Miss.
RB Onterrio McCalebb, Auburn 5-10 172 Jr. Fort Meade, Fla.

DEFENSE

First-Team Defense

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
DL Jake Bequette, Arkansas 6-5 271 Sr. Little Rock, Ark.
DL Josh Chapman, Alabama 6-1 310 Sr. Hoover, Ala.
DL Malik Jackson, Tennessee 6-5 270 Sr. Northridge, Calif.
DL Devin Taylor, South Carolina 6-7 248 Jr. Beaufort, S.C.
LB Dont'a Hightower, Alabama 6-4 260 Jr. Lewisburg, Tenn.
LB Chris Marve, Vanderbilt 6-0 235 Sr. Memphis, Tenn.
LB Danny Trevathan, Kentucky 6-1 230 Sr. Leesburg, Fla.
DB Mark Barron, Alabama 6-2 218 Sr. Mobile, Ala.
DB Stephon Gilmore, South Carolina 6-1 194 Jr. Rock Hill, S.C.
DB Robert Lester, Alabama 6-2 210 Jr. Foley, Ala.
DB Morris Claiborne, LSU 6-0 177 Jr. Shreveport, La.

Second-Team Defense

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
DL Melvin Ingram, South Carolina 6-2 271 Sr. Hamlet, N.C.
DL DeAngelo Tyson, Georgia 6-2 306 Sr. Statesboro, Ga.
DL Kentrell Lockett, Ole Miss 6-5 248 Sr. Hahnville, La.
DL Fletcher Cox, Mississippi State 6-4 295 Jr. Yazoo City, Miss.
DL Barkevious Mingo, LSU 6-5 240 So. West Monroe, La.
LB Ryan Baker, LSU 6-0 227 Sr. Grand Ridge, Fla.
LB Jerry Franklin, Arkansas 6-1 245 Sr. Marion, Ark.
LB Courtney Upshaw, Alabama 6-2 265 Sr. Eufaula, Ala.
DB Brandon Boykin, Georgia 5-10 183 Sr. Fayetteville, Ga.
DB Casey Hayward, Vanderbilt 5-11 188 Sr. Perry, Ga.
DB Tramain Thomas, Arkansas 6-0 198 Sr. Winnie, Texas
DB Tyrann Mathieu, LSU 5-9 180 So. New Orleans, La.

Third-Team Defense

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
DL Corey Lemonier, Auburn 6-4 229 So. Hialeah, Fla.
DL Sam Montgomery, LSU 6-4 250 So. Greenwood, S.C.
DL Travian Robertson, South Carolina 6-4 298 Sr. Laurinburg, N.C.
DL Tenarius Wright, Arkansas 6-2 252 Jr. Memphis, Tenn.
LB Jon Bostic, Florida 6-1 238 Jr. Wellington, Fla.
LB Jelani Jenkins, Florida 6-1 233 So. Olney, Md.
LB C.J. Mosley, Alabama 6-2 234 So. Theodore, Ala.
DB Johnathan Banks, Mississippi State 6-2 185 Jr. Maben, Miss.
DB Dre' Kirkpatrick, Alabama 6-3 192 Jr. Gadsden, Ala.
DB Neiko Thorpe, Auburn 6-2 185 Sr. Tucker, Ga.
DB Prentiss Waggner, Tennessee 6-2 181 Jr. Clinton, La.

SPECIALISTS

First-Team  Specialists

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
PK Blair Walsh, Georgia 5-10 192 Sr. Boca Raton, Fla.
P Drew Butler, Georgia 6-2 214 Sr. Duluth, Ga.
RS Brandon Boykin, Georgia 5-10 183 Sr. Fayetteville, Ga.
AP Joe Adams, Arkansas 5-11 190 Sr. Little Rock, Ark.

Second-Team  Specialists

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
PK Caleb Sturgis, Florida 5-10 192 Redshirt Jr. St. Augustine, Fla.
P Tyler Campbell, Ole Miss 6-2 227 Jr. Little Rock, Ark.
RS Warren Norman, Vanderbilt 5-10 195 Jr. Stone Mountain, Georgia
AP Trent Richardson, Alabama 5-11 224 Jr. Pensacola, Fla.

Third-Team  Specialists

Position Name, Team Height Weight Class Hometown
PK Zach Hocker, Arkansas 6-0 180 So. Russellville, Ark.
P Dylan Breeding, Arkansas 6-1 211 Jr. Hoover, Ala.
P Ryan Tydlacka, Kentucky 6-1 185 Sr. Louisville, Ky.
RS Andre DeBose, Florida 5-11 180 So. Sanford, Fla.
AP Trey Burton, Florida 6-2 222 So. Venice, Fla.


Posted on: July 8, 2011 10:40 am
Edited on: July 8, 2011 10:53 am
 

Bronko Nagurski Watch List released

Posted by Chip Patterson

The "Watch" Watch continues on as the Football Writers Association of America and the Charlotte Touchdown Club have released the first watch list for the 2011 Bronko Nagurski Trophy.

The award is given annually to the nation's best defensive player, as selected by FWAA All-America Committee members. Players can be added or deleted from the watch list at any time throughout the season, a player not on the list can work his way on by being name Defensive Player of the Week by the FWAA.

Check out the full watch list below. Any snubs? Who's your favorite? Let us know in the comment section below.

2011 BRONKO NAGURSKI TROPHY PRESEASON WATCH LIST (87)
Ray-Ray Armstrong, Miami, S Markelle Martin, Oklahoma State, S
Mark Barron, Alabama, S Mike Martin, Michigan, DT
Jake Bequette, Arkansas, DE Chris Marve, Vanderbilt, LB
Brandon Boykin, Georgia, CB Jonathan Massaquoi, Troy, DE
Nigel Bradham, Florida State, LB Michael Mauti, Penn State, LB
Tanner Brock, TCU, LB T.J. McDonald, USC, S
Arthur Brown, Kansas State, LB Chase Minnifield, Virginia, CB
Zach Brown, North Carolina, LB Charles Mitchell, Mississippi State, S
Vince Browne, Northwestern, DE Roosevelt Nix, Kent State, DE
Vontaze Burfict, Arizona State, LB Donte Paige-Moss, North Carolina, DE
Miles Burris, San Diego State, LB Dontari Poe, Memphis, DT
Tank Carder, TCU, LB Tydreke Powell, North Carolina, DT
Morris Claiborne, LSU, CB Shaun Prater, Iowa, CB
Quinton Coples, North Carolina, DE Kheeston Randall, Texas, DT
Fletcher Cox, Mississippi State, DE Kendall Reyes, Connecticut, DT
Jared Crick, Nebraska, DT Xavier Rhodes, Florida State, CB
Vinny Curry, Marshall, DE Adrian Robinson, Temple, DE
Lavonte David, Nebraska, LB Josh Robinson, UCF, CB
Alfonzo Dennard, Nebraska, CB Keenan Robinson, Texas, LB
Tony Dye, UCLA, S J.K. Schaffer, Cincinnati, LB
Marcus Forston, Miami, DT Kawann Short, Purdue, DT
Jerry Franklin, Arkansas, LB Mychal Sisson, Colorado State, LB
Stephon Gilmore, South Carolina, CB Shayne Skov, Stanford, LB
Zaviar Gooden, Missouri, LB Harrison Smith, Notre Dame, S
Logan Harrell, Fresno State, DT Akeem Spence, Illinois, DT
Cliff Harris, Oregon, CB Sean Spence, Miami, LB
Casey Hayward, Vanderbilt, CB Alameda Ta'amu, Washington, DT
Dont'a Hightower, Alabama, LB Keith Tandy, West Virginia, CB
Jayron Hosley, Virginia Tech, CB Kenny Tate, Maryland, S/LB
Jaye Howard, Florida, DT Bruce Taylor, Virginia Tech, LB
Delano Howell, Stanford, S Devin Taylor, South Carolina, DE
Bruce Irvin, West Virginia, DE Manti Te'o, Notre Dame, LB
Malik Jackson, Tennessee, DT Taylor Thompson, SMU, DE
Brandon Jenkins, Florida State, DE Danny Trevathan, Kentucky, LB
James-Michael Johnson, Nevada, LB Courtney Upshaw, Alabama, LB
Coryell Judie, Texas A&M, CB Prentiss Waggner, Tennessee, S
Mychal Kendricks, California, LB Bobby Wagner, Utah State, LB
Dre Kirkpatrick, Alabama, CB Brian Wagner, Akron, LB
Jake Knott, Iowa State, LB Korey Williams, Southern Miss, LB
Luke Kuechly, Boston College, LB Nathan Williams, Ohio State, DE
Robert Lester, Alabama, S Billy Winn, Boise State, DT
Travis Lewis, Oklahoma, LB Derek Wolfe, Cincinnati, DT
Brandon Lindsey, Pittsburgh, DE Jerel Worthy, Michigan State, DT
Brad Madison, Missouri, DE  
By conference: SEC 19, ACC 14, Big Ten 10, Big 12 9, Pac-12 9, Big East 6, Conference USA 5, Mountain West 5, Independents 3, MAC 3, WAC 3, Sun Belt 1.
Players may be added or deleted from the list before or during the season
Posted on: July 5, 2011 5:53 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2011 6:22 pm
 

SEC math says back Bulldogs, doubt Tigers

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Click over to the "expanded" version of the Major League Baseball standings here at CBSsports.com, and you'll see something interesting: Each team's record in one-run games.

Even 10 years ago, casual baseball fans would have shrugged at those records every bit as forcefully as they would have at "record in day games played west of the Mississippi River in which both starting pitchers wore mustaches." But thanks to baseball's stats revolution, even your average CBSSports.com-reading seamhead likely knows that over 162 games, every team's record in such close games will gravitate to .500.

This is an outgrowth of Bill James' pythagorean theorem for baseball, which, if you 've never heard of it, isn't nearly as complicated as its name might make it sound; the idea is simply that total runs scored and allowed (i.e., winning by many runs rather than just one) is a better indicator of future performance than straight win-loss record.

And though college football isn't nearly as stats-obsessed a sport as baseball has become, concepts like these are hardly new to dedicated followers of the pigskin, either. Numbers-driven magazine guru Phil Steele has been tracking "net close wins" for years, finding that teams that win or lose an unusually high number of one-possession games one season tend to lose or win a corresponding number the next season. (The current poster children for this phenomenon are the Iowa Hawkeyes, who lost four games in 2008 by a total of 12 points, went 11-2 in 2009 by winning four games by a total of eight points, then slipped back to 8-5 last year with all five losses coming by seven points or less.)

One Alabama blog, RollBamaRoll, has taken the next step where the SEC is concerned, actually performing the Pythagorean calculations for the 2010 SEC conference season. Though eight games is a tiny sample size for this kind of statistical work, the same calculations predicted (or would have) the downfall of such notable disappointments as 2005 Tennessee, 2000 Alabama, and 2009 Georgia.

So what do these approaches have to say about the SEC in 2011? Several things:

Georgia should be taken seriously in the East. Both Steele and the pythagorean wins agree: the Bulldogs were the unluckiest team in the SEC last season. Mark Richt's team suffered a league-high four "net close losses," and per their points scored/allowed should have won nearly two more games than they did in 2010.

Combine better fortune in competitive games with the Bulldogs' manageable schedule, and the numbers say Georgia should be poised to take a big step forward in 2011. (Steele pegs them as this year's East champions.) If they don't, the question has to be asked: if Richt can't engineer a turnaround this year, when can he?

Auburn is due for a sizable tumble. The next team to win a national championship without a healthy dose of luck will be the first, but Auburn might have enjoyed a little more than most last season; its seven net close wins were the highest in the nation, according to Steele. The pythagorean wins marked them as overachievers by nearly 2.5 games in SEC play alone. In other words, Gene Chizik and company shouldn't expect quite so many friendly bounces of the ball in 2011--and should in fact expect the opposite.

Of course, the numbers can't account for the expertise of Gus Malzahn or the fine recruiting classes assembled under Chizik's watch. But it's safe to say that between less good fortune, the Tigers' massive losses, and a brutal schedule, another top-25 season on the Plains will have been earned.

LSU remains the ultimate wild card. Steele tabulates the Bayou Bengals at five net close wins for 2010 -- usually an indicator of an impending backslide. But thanks to blowouts of Vanderbilt and Mississippi State, the pythagorean wins saw LSU as only slight overachievers in 2010, and (as we've noted before) Les Miles has an unusual knack for late-game decision-making that's given him a 22-9 record at LSU in close games. (Is it the grass?)

In other words, LSU could see Miles' dice-rolls come up snake eyes and the bottom drop out. They could continue to ride the Mad Hatter's hot streak back to a BCS bowl. Any and all possibilities seem to be in play.

Mississippi State may have to run to stay in the same place. With Dan Mullen still in Starkville and plenty of starters returning on both sides of the ball, State may seem poised to take the next step and challenge for a West championship. But there's also some indications the Bulldogs weren't quite as good as their 9-4 record last fall might indicate. Despite going 4-4 in league play they were outscored by 30 points over those eight games, making them the SEC's second-biggest overachiever according to pythagorean wins. And while Steele's net close wins indicator doesn't feel strongly about them, his magazine does note that State's average yardage margin of -36.5 yards per SEC game was third-worst in the conference.

Steele also recently introduced a new metric which shows that teams that take a big leap forward (or backward) over (or under) the baseline of their previous two seasons usually -- though not always -- regress back towards their previously-established mean. Aside from Auburn, no team in the SEC fits that profile better than the Bulldogs.

No reason here to not buy Alabama or South Carolina. Though the above "slipping and sliding" Steele metric is mildly doubtful of Carolina's ability to maintain last year's gains, neither presumptive divisional favorite has anything to worry about from this statistical perspective. In fact, thanks to several blowout wins and their losses to LSU and Auburn by a combined four points, Alabama was the second-most unfortunate team in the league last year behind Georgia.

If the Tide get a handful more breaks and have the defense we're all expecting? Look out.


Posted on: June 28, 2011 12:54 pm
Edited on: June 28, 2011 1:14 pm
 

Ole Miss signee Johnson deletes Twitter account

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

C.J. Johnson hasn't even participated in his first official practice for the Ole Miss team he signed with in February, but he's already made quite the name for himself when it comes to social media ... the kind of name Rebel compliance officials would rather he'd shunned.

Johnson caused a major stir this weekend when Sports by Brooks published a screencap of a handful of sexually graphic, profane tweets from his Twitter account (that link is here, and is safe-for-work image-wise, but please be advised of some NC17-rated language). Not surprisingly, it wasn't long before Johnson had a talk with Ole Miss officials, with predictable results:
The incoming freshman linebacker deleted his Twitter account "after speaking with our staff," Ole Miss spokesman Kyle Campbell said Monday.

Ole Miss officials said Monday they did not force Johnson, who was considered Mississippi's top prospect last season after starring at Philadelphia High School, to delete his account.

"That's something he did on his own," said Jamil Northcutt, associate athletics director for internal operations. "That was in his best interest to do that. I never had any conversations about him taking this down or anything like that."

Of course, you didn't, Jamil. We're sure you just discussed the weather and local politics and calmly asked oh-by-the-way could you not tweet racially-charged obscenities over your nationally-monitored public account, please and thanks? That'd be swell.

To be fair, Johnson's tweets might have gone unnoticed if he hadn't already had a high-profile run-in with social media back in the spring, when Johnson decommitted from Mississippi State and pledged to the Rebels. As way of explanation, he blamed Facebook-stalking Mississippi State fans for spreading accusations about his mother and making his recruitment "a living nightmare."

To also be fair to the Ole Miss officials trying to put the fire out before it spreads any farther, the Rebels have social media policies in place and will offer "social media training" to all incoming athletes, football players included; part of that training will be signing the policy agreement, violations of which could result in suspensions.

The only problem?

The training takes place at the beginning of fall semester, rather than in the summer.

So it's too late to keep this particular cat in the bag. But as long as Johnson keeps his social media missteps to two rather than three, his play on the field this fall -- where  the five-star linebacker could make an immediate impact for the LB-starved Rebels -- will eventually become the bigger headline.

Posted on: June 24, 2011 3:20 pm
 

Hot Seat Ratings show SEC stability

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

When it comes to the SEC and coaching turnover, there's reputation, and there's reality.

The reputation is that with a heaping help of pressure from the nation's most rabid fanbases, the nation's most cutthroat conference hires and fires head coaches on the slightest of whims, for the most gentle of disappointments. And certainly, there have been some head-scratchers over the years, like David Cutcliffe's sudden dismissal from Ole Miss or Houston Nutt's tumultuous departure from Arkansas despite years of success.

But as illustrated by Dennis Dodd's CBS Hot Seat Ratings, since the 2008 season -- and the surprising exits of long-tenured Auburn and Tennessee head coaches Tommy Tuberville and Phillip Fulmer, as well as Mississippi State's Sylvester Croom -- the league that supposedly sees its head coaches change with the wind has in fact become a model of relative stability. Collectively, the SEC has fired just a single coach the past two seasons--Vanderbilt's Robbie Caldwell, himself only hired as a last-minute replacement following Bobby Johnson's retirement.

Four other coaches have left the league in that span, but all of them -- Urban Meyer at Florida, Lane Kiffin at Tennessee, Rich Brooks at Kentucky and Johnson -- did so voluntarily, and in Brooks's case the seamless transition to coach-in-waiting Joker Phillips barely even qualifies as a "coaching change."

That newfound reticence to put coaches on the firing line is reflected in Dodd's ratings, which show just one current SEC coach rated above the median "on the bubble" 3. You get one guess who:

Alabama Nick Saban 0.0
Arkansas Bobby Petrino 1.0
Auburn Gene Chizik 0.0
Florida Will Muschamp 0.5
Georgia Mark Richt 3.5
LSU Les Miles 2.5
Mississippi Houston Nutt 3.0
Mississippi State Dan Mullen 0.0
South Carolina Steve Spurrier 0.0
Kentucky Joker Phillips 1.5
Tennessee Derek Dooley 3.0
Vanderbilt James Franklin 2.0

Assuming we don't have some unforeseen three-win meltdown with Nutt in Oxford, there's a very real possibility the SEC enters 2012 with the same 11 head coaches listed above. Richt is -- without question -- the SEC coach in the most trouble, but he's also a coach with an extremely favorable 2011 schedule, a wealth of talent on hand, and perhaps the most patient administration in the conference.

And if Richt's still here, who won't be? The Spurrier retirement rumors have been securely put to bed with the arrival of recruits like Marcus Lattimore and Jadeveon Clowney. A big 2010 has Miles back on (mostly) firm footing; it'll take multiple down years (or a grass overdose) for him to earn a pink slip. Dooley has at least another couple of seasons with the benefit of the doubt (if we may quibble with Dodd's "3"). And while the aforementioned meltdown might do the trick for Nutt with the Rebels, between his track record and the back-to-back Cotton Bowls -- not something that happens on the regular in Oxford -- he almost certainly has another season of rope.

The most likely coach to keep the SEC from going 12-for-12 in the retention department isn't likely to be fired at all, in fact; it's Dan Mullen, who could be one more sterling season in Starkville away from getting the kind of megabucks, keystone program offer the Bulldogs just can't quite match.

But the guess here is that Dodd, overall, is entirely correct--if Mullen stays put and Richt can salvage eight or nine wins, there's not enough heat under the SEC seats to expect a coaching change anywhere in the league's 12 head coaching positions.


Posted on: June 6, 2011 3:26 pm
 

Place your bet: Who picks up next NCAA violation?

Posted by Tom Fornelli

College football programs running afoul of the NCAA is the latest fashion in the sport today, as seemingly every program is running out and picking up all the latest violations. USC already has its, and Ohio State is next in line, but who will follow the Buckeyes? Well, if you feel you have a good idea, you can put your money where your gut instinct is. Among the bets that online sportsbook BetUS.com is listing on its website these days is which NCAA program will be the next to commit an NCAA violation? While the site if offering odds on schools themselves, or separate football and basketball programs, we are a football blog. So we're going to focus on the football odds.

They are as follows:

Southern California 8/1
Ohio State 9/1
Florida 10/1
Ole Miss 10/1
Florida State 12/1
Michigan State 12/1
Alabama 13/1
Michigan 13/1
Georgia 14/1
Iowa 14/1
Georgia Tech 14/1
Oklahoma 15/1
Virginia Tech 15/1
Mississippi State 15/1
Cincinnati 15/1
Texas A&M 15/1
Boston College 16/1
Oklahoma State 17/1
Texas 18/1
Texas Tech 18/1
Missouri 18/1
TCU 20/1
UCLA 20/1
California 20/1 

I don't want to tell you where to place your money, but I do like the value of Ole Miss at 10/1.

Also, if betting on NCAA violations goes against your moral code as a college football fan, don't worry. The site is also taking bets on the number of Florida Gators football players who will be arrested in 2011. Now is your chance to make crime pay! 

Posted on: June 2, 2011 3:26 pm
Edited on: June 13, 2011 9:54 am
 

CBSSports.com College Football 100: 50-41

By the Eye on College Football bloggers

To celebrate the (now fewer than) 100 days remaining until the first Saturday of the new college football season, this is the CBSSports.com College Football 100: our countdown of the 2011 season's 100 most influential players, coaches, administrators, venues, or any other related
things in college football. It's like that other "most influential" list, but, you know, more important. Also: it's supposed to be fun. Enjoy.

50. COWBELLS, traditional noisemakers, Mississippi State. On the one hand, yeah, it's just a bell with a stick attached to it and (usually) a State logo affixed to one side. But on the other, it's a huge reason why trips to Starkville have become a gigantic thorn in the side of SEC favorites since Dan Mullen took over the Bulldog helm. The cowbells create a tremendous amount of noise during their designated usage periods (touchdown celebrations, timeouts, etc.), but there's plenty enough State fans willing to use them during non-designated periods that Davis-Wade Stadium can become just as loud and disruptive as SEC stadiums with twice its capacity.

And in 2011, how loud Davis-Wade can get will matter. A lot. The Bulldogs will play host to both of the consensus SEC West favorites and the closest thing the preseason has to an SEC East favorite--LSU visits Sept. 15, South Carolina Oct. 15 and Alabama Nov. 12. A State victory in any one of those three games could immediately turn the entire conference on its head--and given that this is Mullen's most experienced team yet, the guess here is that thanks in part to those cowbells, the Bulldogs will come away with at least one of those scalps. -- JH

49. DOAK CAMPBELL STADIUM, home venue, Florida State. The Seminoles' home field will play host to one of the biggest non-conference matchups of the season--and it takes place on the third weekend of football. On September 17, Oklahoma -- expected to be one of the top-ranked teams in the nation -- will visit Doak looking to repeat last year's thumping of FSU in Norman. The Seminoles return 17 starters from last year's team that finished the season as the ACC runner-up and Chick Fil-A Bowl champion, though, leading many to tap Florida State as the 2011 ACC frontrunner. It's safe to say head coach Jimbo Fisher has brought the hype back to Tallahassee in just his second year.

So the two juggernauts will collide in Doak Campbell Stadium. A win for Oklahoma would be a huge confidence boost after struggling in a few crucial road games over the last couple years. A win for Florida State would not only bring the Sooners' title hopes to a screeching halt, it would transform the home team from ACC favorite to national title contender. The 'Noles also get Maryland, N.C. State and Miami all at home, making Doak not only a key destination for the national title picture but the key venue for the ACC Atlantic race. If the Seminoles can escape the month of September undefeated, it could be their race to lose down the stretch. -- CP

48. AL GOLDEN, head coach, Miami. The Hurricane coaching search was heavily publicized and tossed around flashy names like Jon Gruden and Dan Mullen, but the final decision was on the decidedly less-flashy, hard-nosed Golden. Since joining the program, Golden has talked about changing the "culture" of Miami football. After watching the team prepare for the Sun Bowl, Golden said he wanted to practice faster, hit harder, and increase the toughness up and down the roster. His winter conditioning program produced players' tales of being worked harder than ever, and his gritty demands continued well into spring practice.

But Golden needs to be more than a strength coach and philosopher for the Hurricanes. He needs to be the face of the program moving forward, and the team needs to believe in his word. There is a roster full of talent in Coral Gables that has not come close to sniffing a conference championship. Since joining the ACC in 2004, the Hurricanes have yet to produce so much as a Coastal division title. Golden's arrival has brought a lot of excitement back to The U, but also the expectations for winning. If Golden is going to get the trust of Randy Shannon's team, he will need to show them that his "culture" produces championship-caliber football. -- CP

47. THE BIG TEN THANKSGIVING DINNER, new-and-improved rivalry weekend, November 25-26. The Big Ten, for better or worse, has always been unusually staid about its traditions--that means Saturday conference games only, no conference games after November 25 (which usually ends the season before Thanksgiving), and Michigan-Ohio State to end the conference season, always. That has worked out pretty well for the Big Ten for the most part, although Buckeye fans in particular have long rued the six weeks of layoff between a pre-Thanksgiving conference finish and a January BCS bowl game (since the SEC and most other conferences would only have four weeks).

Say goodbye to that disparity, though, because the Big Ten has moved the end of its regular season to Thanksgiving weekend. That decision plus the conference championship game equals football in December in the Big Ten, just like everywhere else. And what a regular season finale week the Big Ten has lined up for its fans this year: Michigan-OSU is still there, as fans demanded en masse when scheduling was going on, but now it's not the only show in town. Iowa and Nebraska have set up a season-ending rivalry for the next four years (one expects this to be made permanent if fans respond well to the new rivalry), and breaking with all sorts of conference tradition, it'll be on Friday. There's also a key showdown with Penn State at Wisconsin, and if Ohio State's not in contention for the (sigh) Leaders Division title, PSU-Wisconsin will likely have heavy implications for that bid to the championship. Same goes for Michigan State at Northwestern in the Legends Division. That's a heck of a way to spend a Thanksgiving weekend, isn't it? -- AJ

46. KELLEN MOORE, quarterback, Boise State. Kellen Moore's career thus far seems to have taken an arc we usually only see in TV shows. Last season was the "championship run" season, where Boise State was as poised as it ever was to crash the BCS Championship before fate conspired to take down the heroes. And make no mistake, Moore was a hero last year, leading the nation in passing efficiency and racking up 35 touchdowns to just six interceptions. He may not have had a chance to overtake Cam Newton for Heisman consideration, but his fate was sealed in the Broncos' 34-31 loss to Nevada--even though Moore threw a downright miraculous 53-yard bomb to Titus Young that put Boise in position to win the game.

If last season was all about the team taking its best shot at the title, this year's all about Moore; his top two receivers, Young and Austin Pettis, are both off to the NFL now, and key reserve RB Jeremy Avery is also gone. The Broncos find themselves in a tougher conference, too, though they still look to be favorites to win the Mountain West championship. If there were ever a time for Moore to erase the last of the doubts about his ability to play quarterback, this'll be it, and with any luck, this season'll end on a much more crowd-pleasing note for Moore and the rest of his teammates. -- AJ

45. THE PAC-12 HOT SEAT, conference furniture, Pac-12. When Pac-12 media days roll around next year, there's a good chance there will be a few different faces from this year's edition. While every conference has their fair share of coaches on the hot seat, it seems as though the Pac-12 has a hot couch with so many people to fit on it. Washington State's Paul Wulff, UCLA's Rick Neuheisel, Arizona State's Dennis Erickson and Cal's Jeff Tedford are those that are feeling the heat ... and a bad year by USC's Lane Kiffin could find him starting to sweat as well.

The coach with the best chance to get off of the seat is Erickson, who has a team full of upperclassmen and is primed to make a run at the first ever Pac-12 South title. Erickson is just barely over .500 in his time in Tempe and has only finished in the upper half of the conference standings once. Needless to say, it's put up or shut up time. Wulff's winning percentage is well south of the Mendoza Line (.135 entering 2011) and he probably needs to get the Cougars close to a bowl game in order to get another year. Neuheisel and Tedford both have upset fan bases and a really bad year will likely mean they're out; financial considerations might be the only thing that could keep them around. The hot seat is crowded in the Pac-12 and it should be fun to see who gets off of it this season -- one way or another -- first. -- BF

44. OKLAHOMA'S BUMPY ROAD, scheduling hurdle, Oklahoma. Oklahoma seems to be the popular pick to be ranked No. 1 in the preseason polls, which gives the Sooners an edge in its pursuit of a national championship. All it has to do is go undefeated -- that's it! -- and the Sooners will find themselves in the BCS Championship Game. Obviously, winning every single game on the schedule is not an easy thing to do, particularly when you've got that giant target on your back ... and things could be even tougher for Oklahoma when you look at their schedule.

Over the last two seasons, Oklahoma has played nine games on the road -- not counting neutral site games -- and the Sooners have gone a distressing 3-5. Last season the Sooners won two games on the road, against Cincinnati and Oklahoma State, but only won those games by a combined eight points. This season two of Oklahoma's toughest games will be on the road, as it travels to Florida State during the second week of the season and will finish the year against those same Cowboys in Stillwater. Then there's the neutral site battle with Texas. It wouldn't be a shock to anybody if the Sooners came away from those three games with at least one loss on the marker. And given that there's no longer a Big 12 title game that could help boost the Sooners' profile at the end of the year, that loss could singlehandedly derail the team's 2011 title hopes. -- TF

43. WILL MUSCHAMP, head coach, Florida. In some ways, Muschamp will have less pressure on him this season than the other two head coaches in the SEC East's "Big Three"; Mark Richt is firmly in win-or-else mode, and Steve Spurrier has to know his career won't last long enough to see talents like Marcus Lattimore and Alshon Jeffery come around again. Muschamp, meanwhile, may need a couple of seasons to get his favored pro-style offense working and his aggressive defense completely in place.

Then again, this is Florida. And Muschamp is replacing a coach with three SEC East titles and two national championships in the last five seasons alone; transition or no transition, a second straight year bumbling around the 7-5 mark with an offense barely fit to wear the same jerseys as the Spurrier Fun n' Gun or the Tim Tebow/Percy Harvin spread juggernaut won't go over well at all. The easiest way for Florida to improve, fortunately, is Muschamp's specialty: defense. The Gators have all the athletes needed to dominate on that side of the ball, and if Muschamp's going to extend his coaching honeymoon past the season's first month, they'd better. -- JH

42. BIG EAST CONFERENCE TIEBREAKERS, potential title-deciders, Big East. Since 2003, the Big East title has been split four times. Two of those times were between at least three teams, most recently last season when Connecticut won the tie-breaker over West Virginia and Pitt. As the conference's front office continues to eye expansion and the addition of a conference championship, the eight teams participating in conference play this fall will all be fighting for the BCS berth awarded to number one team in the standings.

With the seven game conference schedule (which is backloaded, for most teams), there are less games to separate the teams in the standings. Unless one team goes undefeated (West Virginia in 2005, Cincinnati in 2009), there is a good chance that there will be a tie at the top of the standings. In the final month of the season the Big East title hunt will become a wild collection of if/then scenarios, with each conference game carrying a tie-breaker significance. -- CP

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41. ROBERT GRIFFIN III, quarterback, Baylor. Last season the Baylor Bears finished the season 7-6 and played in their first bowl game in 16 years, a 38-14 loss to Illinois in the Texas Bowl. While there are plenty of reasons to help explain the turnaround in Waco the last few seasons, no person has had a bigger impact on the program than quarterback Robert Griffin III. The kid known as RG3 has not only been a star in the classroom, but on the field as well, accounting for 4,145 total yards and 30 touchdowns in 2010. Make no mistake about it: while the Baylor defense cost the team some games, Griffin kept the Bears in just about all of them with what he brought on offense.

As a redshirt junior in 2011, Griffin will be playing his fourth season with the Bears, and should be better than ever--a scary proposition for Big 12 defenses already struggling to stop him. While Baylor's defense will likely keep it from having a real shot to win the Big 12 this season, odds are that RG3 is going to have a big say in who ultimately does win the conference ... meaning that he could have a big impact on the national title picture as well before the year is finished. -- TF

The 100 will continue here on Eye on CFB tomorrow. Until then, check out Nos. 100-91, 90-81, 80-71, 70-61 and 60-51. You can also keep up with the 100 by following us on Twitter.



Posted on: June 1, 2011 2:34 pm
 

SEC modifies way it will handle violations

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Remember when Terrelle Pryor went by the name of Cam Newton? Those were the days, huh? Well, while the SEC didn't sit on any information about Cam Newton or any player in its conference for eight months without reporting it, the way the Newton case was handled last season was a bit slow. While Mississippi State first reported concerns about Newton's recruitment to the SEC in January 2010, after the SEC asked for more information from the school, Mississippi State didn't get back to the SEC until July. The excuse given was that the school's compliance department had a lot of other stuff to do.

Well, the NCAA let SEC commissioner Mike Slive, and the other conferences, know that it would appreciate it if they all figured out a way to speed things up a bit when it comes to reporting these violations, and according to Slive, the SEC has done just that.

"We've reached an accommodation as to the kinds of issues they (the NCAA) have had in mind, and what they want to know, when they want to know," Slive told The Birmingham News. "Those are relatively simple things for us to accommodate. There may be certain issues that they want to know about earlier than others. We have no problem reaching that accommodation."

Of course, Slive didn't say what the changes that the SEC will be making are, so I can't tell you what will be different in the future. Though I suppose one of the changes will be "don't take six months to get back to us when we ask for something."

 
 
 
 
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