Posted on: May 3, 2011 2:41 pm

LSU employs The Most Compliant Man in the World

Posted by Jerry Hinnen 

So, how could Boise State have avoided getting tagged with that nasty "lack of institutional control" charge the NCAA levied at them yesterday? Why, they could have hired away this gentleman from LSU, the Most Compliant Man in the World:

This is a narrow subset of humor we're wading into -- not just college football humor, but college football pop-culture NCAA compliance nerd humor -- but at just 38 seconds' worth, we feel it's a single serving worth your time. 

Though we have to ask: wouldn't the real Most Compliant Man in the World have spent his work day on, you know, compliance stuff, rather than making a humorous Internet video about compliance? Or did making the video and raising awareness of compliance accomplish more compliance than actually complying? There's your Zen koan for the day.

Via via. 


Category: NCAAF
Posted on: April 28, 2011 6:36 pm

TicketCity Bowl in danger of NCAA pulling plug?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It's been a busy day in the world of the NCAA and the 35 bowls it kinda-sorta oversees. Earlier today, the organization made two big announcements, instituting a three-year moratorium on new bowls and establishing a "Bowl Licensing Task Force" to make sure any future Fiesta Bowl scandals are nipped in the bud.

Towards that end, the NCAA made another announcement this afternoon, reaffirming the licenses for 32 bowls that will continue play as  planned in 2011-2012. Of the three whose licenses were not renewed, it's no surprise that two of them were the Fiesta and the Insight Bowl , both of which are jointly organized by the same corrupt executives.

But I'm not sure anyone had the brand-new TicketCity Bowl pegged for potential NCAA danger. The game has been played just once, this past New Year's Day, as the Cotton Bowl stadium's replacement for the actual Cotton Bowl (which moved across town to Jerry Jones' space palace). But it doesn't sound like the current licensing committee is too happy with them:
The subcommittee delayed its decision on reaffirming the TicketCity Bowl license as well pending further information and discussion of its business plan ...

The committee requires bowls to meet several licensing criteria annually in order to maintain their bowl license. Among other items, the committee reviews conference commitments, sponsorships, revenue expectations, facility condition, bowl management, and community support.
There's no indication of the likelihood of the license being denied or renewed, or on what timetable that decision might be reached.

What we can say for certain is that this is one start-up bowl game we'd actually like to see make it. The Cotton Bowl has hosted New Year's Day football every year since 1937 ; bringing an end to that kind of decades-deep tradition while watching the (to pick an example unfairly at random) Beef 'O' Brady's Bowl continue on in atmosphere-less Tropicana Field  just seems ... what's the word we're looking for here ... oh yes: wrong.

But until the NCAA officially gives the TicketCity the go-ahead, that's the reality it -- and we -- are facing.

For more on this and similar issues, check out this week's CBSSports podcast with Nick Carparelli, chair of the NCAA's Bowl Licensure Subcommittee.

Posted on: April 27, 2011 6:28 pm
Edited on: April 28, 2011 1:37 pm

Podcast: Interview with NCAA's Carparelli

Adam Aizer and J. Darin Darst chat with NCAA's Nick Carparelli , chair of the Bowl License Subcomittee. Carparelli addresses the report regarding his attendance of the 2008 Fiesta Frolic, saying there will be no conflict of interest when the Subcommittee rules on the Fiesta Bowl's status.

He also says these types of events will continue to go on, explains the NCAA's role in bowl games and tells us what he wants to hear from the Fiesta Bowl this week.

"I think some things are just a way of life, especially in this country. I can't think of too many businesses where there is a client relationship that doesn't involve some going out to dinner to talk about business or playing golf occasionally. I don't see those two things as conflict of interest or anything that is going to cause bias by the committee members. I think that's a little far-fetched and a little bit of sensationalization to think that would be the case."
When asked if he thought about stepping down to show the public good faith because of the perception of a conflict of interest, Carparelli said:

"Aboslutely not. Not for one minute."

Listen to the complete interview here: 

Subscribe to all of the CBSSports.com Podcasts.
Posted on: April 27, 2011 12:07 pm

SEC ref: no 'borderline' unsportsmanlike flags

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Aside from possibly Cam Newton (in locales outside of East Central Alabama, anyway), there's nothing college football fans despise more than an unnecessary unsportsmanlike conduct penalty with the game on the line. There's not a fan alive who wouldn't prefer officials keep their flags in their pocket whenever possible, and given the emotion, competitiveness and spectacle of a big college football game, it's almost always possible to let a touchdown celebration to go unpunished.

Which is why the NCAA's decision to potentially make those penalties even more damaging in 2011 -- by making them a live ball foul when committed before the whistle, thus able to take an otherwise legitimate touchdown off the board -- has already become the most criticized, most hated rules change in recent memory.

But one SEC official says the furor is going to be much ado about nothing. Speaking to the Knoxville News-Sentinel, the SEC's John Wright assures fans the zebras aren't going to deploy the nuclear unsportsmanlike option unless they have to (emphasis added):
Wright ... says conference officials won’t be “nitpicky.”

“If somebody turns a flip or flips a bird at somebody, a team should be penalized,” he said. “But if somebody does something borderline, we will not call it. Everybody in the stadium will know (that it was an unsportsmanlike act) if we call it.

“The way we have been told (by the SEC), these things have to jump out at you. If a guy stands over somebody and beats his chest, we know that’s a foul.”
SEC supervisor of officials Steve Shaw echoed Wright's statements, saying the league has made those calls a point of offseason emphasis and that "we don't want to be too technical" when applying the rule.

But we already knew the SEC doesn't like overzealous unsportsmanlike flags. Remember A.J. Green getting penalized for this in the dying minutes against LSU?

The league subsequently admitted the call had been blown, but by then the Bulldogs had already lost. And even if the SEC is doing its best to prevent needless unsportsmanlike calls, what about the leagues whose officials have been responsible for this ...

... or this* ...

If there's any silver lining to this collection of horrors, it's that even in 2011, none of these flags would have negated the touchdowns in question. But that lining doesn't remove the giant black cloud that suggests that given the power to unnecessarily alter the score over perceived unsportsmanlike conduct, some official somewhere will.

So we appreciate Wright's reassurances. But until/unless we actually reach the end of the 2011 season without some new outrage perpetrated by this rule, we're going to continue believing this to be a terrible, terrible idea.

*Incidentally, this was the officiating decision which Lou Holtz would later decry as a "shavesty of justice." Just so you know.

HT: DocSat.

Posted on: April 21, 2011 6:01 pm
Edited on: April 21, 2011 6:05 pm

NCAA delays Fiesta Bowl ruling

Posted by Chip Patterson

While the college football offseason has provided us with plenty of off-field news to talk about, few headlines have stirred the BCS pot quite like the reports of financial improprieties with the Fiesta Bowl. Many believe that the Fiesta Bowl, as well as the Insight Bowl, could both be in jeopardy of losing their licenses when the bowls are reviewed by the Postseason Bowl Licensing Subcommittee at an annual meeting in New Orleans next weekend. On Thursday Nick Carparelli, Jr., the chair of the Football Issues Committee, announced that any specific decision on the two bowls would be delayed until another time.

“We are delaying our overall licensing review and decision of the Fiesta Bowl and Insight Bowl until we can discuss these details with bowl officials and fully examine all appropriate information,” Carparelli explained in an official release.

The licensing subcommittee has asked bowl representatives to provide details as to how they will improve the management of the bowls and their finances, including future business plans. For the organizers of the two bowl games, the extension comes as good news. Now the big-wigs who have not been removed from their post can have more time to clean up the mess. They will fight in the coming months to prove the Fiesta Bowl's validity as a principle member of the Bowl Championship Series, while Jerry Jones and the Cotton Bowl wait patiently with baited breath.
Posted on: April 15, 2011 11:07 am
Edited on: April 15, 2011 11:10 am

NCAA institutes clock runoff for late-game flags

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It's come too late to save Tennessee's infamous last-second -- or more accurately, post- last-second -- Music City Bowl loss to North Carolina. But in the wake of the Tar Heels saving themselves from watching the clock run out by accidentally committing an offensive penalty, the NCAA has now officially followed the NFL's lead in instituting a 10-second runoff for offensive infractions inside the final minute of either half.

Technically, the runoff isn't mandatory; the defending team has the option of declining both it and the penalty if they happen to be behind.

The new rule was recommended in February by the NCAA's Football Rules Committee and approved by the Playing Rules Oversight Panel, who naturally led their release with the panel's relatively minor change to receivers' ability to block below the waist. The NCAA also offers no recommendations on what to call the new clock regulation, though the "Dooley Rule" has to be the leader in the clubhouse.

Reviewing the other rules changes:
  • Previously, receivers' below-the-waist blocks (i.e. "cut" blocks, though you knew that already) were determined to be legal based in part on how close they were to the line-of-scrimmage or whether they were in motion. Now, unless they start the play within seven yards of the center (essentially, as a tight end), receiver's cut blocks must be made against a player facing them or headed towards the sideline. It sounds confusing, but from the official's perspective, disregarding the previous qualifications in favor of "have you lined up inside the tackle box or as a tight end or not?" has simplified things. We think.
  • The panel gave final approval to two rules changes already decided on last year, the more noteworthy of which is the shift of taunting penalties to live ball fouls, giving the officials the right to revoke a touchdown based on unsportsmanlike conduct while the touchdown is being scored.. No doubt you've read -- and complained -- about this decision plenty already.
  • The other change? Coaches will be allowed monitors in their coaching booths to watch a live broadcast of the game--and, to the point, determine if a replay challenge should be issued or not. As a result, we could see a slight uptick in the effectiveness of challenges in college football this coming season.
Posted on: April 14, 2011 11:06 am

Auburn readying statues of Heisman winners

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Given the press surrounding the soon-to-be-unveiled Nick Saban statue at Alabama and the new row of Heisman-winning quarterback statues at Florida, it was only a matter of time before some other school stepped forward to keep up with the Joneses in Tuscaloosa and Gainesville.

And this week, in a letter to fans and alumni, Tiger athletic director Jay Jacobs made it official that that school would be Auburn. The Tiger athletic department last year commissioned statues of past Heisman winners Pat Sullivan and Bo Jackson, before having to add another sculpture to their shopping list when Cam Newton picked up the program's third Heisman last December. "Little did we know we would need to add a third statue so soon," Jacobs wrote.

Newton's honor likely pushed the timetable for the unveiling back from this weekend's "A-Day" spring game to the 2011 season; the artist's website says the Sullivan and Jackson statues are already completed. If there's any positive to the delay from the Auburn perspective, it's that it will give the program another few months in which to avoid unveiling the Newton statue should anything come to light in the still-ongoing (as far as we know) NCAA investigation into his recruitment.

But obviously, Jacobs and Auburn aren't expecting any developments like that soon, or ever; it's hard to prove a belief in a player's innocence any more emphatically than setting a nine-foot tall, one-ton statue of him outside the stadium directly alongside the team's two greatest legends, isn't it?
Posted on: April 12, 2011 12:43 pm

NCAA warns players about draft parties

Posted by Tom Fornelli

You know, at times the NCAA seems like an overbearing parent that just doesn't want their kids to have any fun. I mean, imagine for a moment that a good friend of yours, and a former teammate is attending the NFL Draft this month and his entire life is about to change. He's going to be drafted, and he's going to get a contract and earn more money than he ever thought possible. Wouldn't you want to be there with him to celebrate this occasion?

Of course you would, but the NCAA would like to remind you that you'd be better off sitting at home and watching on television. The NCAA sent a letter to the NFL which the league then forwarded to the players invited to this year's draft. The letter was a reminder to the players that any of their undergrad friends who plan on attending the draft or any draft parties with them have to pay their own way for everything. Travel, lodging, food, bar tabs and anything else that may come up.

In the letter from the NCAA's Dena Garner, she warns the players "not to jeopardize the NCAA eligibility of your friends or former teammates."

Now, let's be honest here. How many college football players are out there who can afford to fly to New York, pay for a hotel room for a weekend along with meals and everything else? I doubt there are many, so really what the NCAA is telling the undergrads is "stay home."

Bunch of party poopers.

The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com