Tag:Big Ten
Posted on: December 23, 2011 4:41 pm
Edited on: December 23, 2011 4:43 pm
 

Finally, a Christmas gift for the Buckhusker fans

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Twitter user @ZackaFlackaG took this picture of an Ohio State hoodie that takes a rather... interesting turn.



Now, it's not quite as offensive to a fan's sensibilities as, say, this Michigan State "Hail to the Victors" shirt from earlier, but it's still not something that ever should have gone out. And again: it actually went out. This picture was taken at a store, and the hoodie has a tag on it, so somehow nobody from production to retail ever caught the fact that Ohio State's team is not, in fact, called the Huskers.

That all said, I now desperately want this hoodie. Christmas is still two days away, people!

If you had been a fan of Eye on College Football on Facebook, you'd have seen this picture first. "Like" us today!

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Posted on: December 22, 2011 1:25 pm
Edited on: December 22, 2011 1:26 pm
 

Texas is the most valuable football program

Posted by Tom Fornelli

They may have only won a total of 12 games in the last two seasons, but that lack of success hasn't done much to change the bottom line for the Texas Longhorns. Forbes has released its list of the most valuable college football programs in the country and, to no surprise, Texas is once again at the top of the list.

Forbes estimates that the program is worth $129 million.
Texas’ total value is driven largely by a football profit of $71 million last season, up from $65 million in 2009. Texas football generated $96 million in revenue, $36 million of which came from ticket sales. Another $30 million was comprised of contributions tied to amenity seating like club seats and luxury suites. The Longhorns also benefited from $10 million worth of sponsorship deals, with Coca-Cola, Nike and PepsiCo’s Gatorade giving a combined $2 million last year.
What is somewhat surprising, however, is that number doesn't even include the revenue from the school's new Longhorn Network. No, those numbers won't be included until next year, so I'm going to go out on a limb right now and predict that Texas will once again be considered the most valuable football program at the end of 2012 as well.

Yeah, that's right. I said it. I'm putting myself out there.

Here's the top ten schools listed with their estimated value.

1. Texas ($129 million)
2. Notre Dame ($112 million)
3. Penn State ($100 million)
4. LSU ($96 million)
5. Michigan ($94 million)
6. Alabama ($93 million)
7. Georgia ($90 million)
8. Arkansas ($89 million)
9. Auburn ($88 million)
10. Oklahoma ($87 million)
Posted on: December 22, 2011 12:39 pm
 

Hokies K Cody Journell suspended after arrest

Posted by Chip Patterson

Virginia Tech sophomore kicker Cody Journell's status for the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 2 against Michigan is now in jeopardy, after an alleged home invasion led to his indefinite suspension from the football team.

The sophomore kicker and two others were arrested and charged with breaking and entering by Blacksburg police late Wednesday night. Below is the report, via The Roanoke Times.

Just before 10 p.m. Wednesday, Blacksburg police responded to a residence on Lee Street, just outside of the downtown area in reference to a physical altercation, according to a morning news release.

An investigation into an alleged home invasion began shortly after and resulted in the arrests of Cody J. Journell, 20; Matthew D. Dunton, 23; and Matthew I. Brady, 21. Each were charged with breaking and entering, a class 2 felony due to the alleged use of a dangerous weapon, according to police.

University policy dictates that Journell be suspended indefinitely from the football team until further information is gathered. As off early Thursday afternoon, all three men are currently being held without bond at the Montgomery County Jail while the investigation continues.

Journell led the ACC field goal percentage, hitting 14 of his 17 attempts on the season. The redshirt sophomore earned All-ACC honorable mention and connected on 43 of 44 extra points on the season. Should he be ruled out for the Sugar Bowl, the place kicking duties would likely be assumed by Tyler Weiss or kickoff specialist Justin Myer.

For all the latest on Virginia Tech and Michigan right until kickoff, check out our Sugar Bowl Pregame page

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Posted on: December 21, 2011 9:27 pm
Edited on: December 22, 2011 9:55 am
 

Pittsburgh hires Wisconsin's Paul Chryst

Posted by Tom Fornelli

It appears we are getting close to Pitt finding a replacement for Todd Graham after Graham left the school to take over at Arizona State.

An Associated Press source with knowledge of the decision says Pittsburgh has hired Wisconsin offensive coordinator Paul Chryst to be the next head football coach.  This confirms a report in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette from Wednesday night, as well as several other outlets with sources close to the program. 

The Post-Gazette report says that the two sides are still working on a contract agreement, and that an official announcement could come in the next day or two. Which, we'll admit, leaves a bit of wiggle room. It wouldn't be the first contract negotiation to go horribly awry.

It had been reported earlier in the week that FIU's Mario Cristobal was the frontrunner for the job with Chryst in second place, but it seems that has changed for now. Chryst also interviewed at Pitt last January before the school decided to hire Todd Graham.

Graham took the Pittsburgh head coaching job 11 months ago preaching character, commitment and a "high octane" offense designed to take the Big East by storm.

What was high-octane was watching Pittsburgh quarterback Tino Sunseri dodge pass rush from the opposition.  The Panthers allowed 57 sacks this season, easily the most in the FBS, and Graham enraged the Pitt fan base by shifting blame from himself to Sunseri.

Chryst, a former Wisconsin quarterback, has built one of the Big Ten's most dominant offensive units since joining the Badgers' coaching staff in 2005.  This season, the Badgers' led the Big Ten in total offense with 466.9 yards per game and the unit has finished in the top three of that same category every season since 2007.   



Posted on: December 21, 2011 6:55 pm
Edited on: December 21, 2011 7:10 pm
 

Roundtable: Changes to the bowl schedule

Posted by Eye On College Football 


Occasionally the Eye on CFB team gathers, Voltron-style, to answer a pressing question from the world of college football. Today's question is:

What changes, if any, would you make to the current bowl schedule and/or bowl eligibility requirements?


Bryan Fischer: Any time you have a team like UCLA playing in a game at 6-7, I think it underscores that there needs to be a new rule that you not only be 6-6, but 7-5 at the very minimum. I get that the bowl games are a treat for the players but shouldn't we be rewarding winners and not the mediocre? The entire bowl system seems to have turned into the college football equivalent of a participation trophy. This, of course, ties-in with the line of reasoning that there are too many bowl games. At some point we'll get to the point where there's a good number of games for good teams but right now the excess causes mediocrity. For every crazy New Orleans Bowl finish we get, there's just as many Beef O'Brady Bowl duds it seems.

Tom Fornelli: I tend to agree with Bryan in that I'm not a big fan of 6-6 teams being rewarded for mediocrity, and I usually fall in line with the "there are too many bowl games" crowd, but then a funny thing happens every year. The games start, and they feature a couple of 6-6 teams, and I love them.

Yeah, there are some duds, but there are plenty of duds every Saturday during the regular season. So I think my personal criticisms from the current bowl system come from the fact that I'd like to see some type of playoff. A plus-one being the minimum of what I'd like to see.  So while I get extremely annoyed when I see that 6-6 Florida is playing 6-6 Ohio State in the Gator Bowl, I'm sorry, the TAXSLAYER.COM (bangs head, SIGN OF THE BEAST!!!) Gator Bowl, I'll probably still watch the game. I'm just a college football junkie, there's no way around it.

Jerry Hinnen: There's an easier fix for getting the UCLA-like riffraff out of the postseason than scuttling existing bowls: re-institute the discarded NCAA mandate that bowls must take teams with winning records ahead of teams with .500 (or sub-.500, in the Bruins' case) marks. "Too many bowls" is going to be a hard sell for the folks at places like Temple -- who unfairly sat at home after going 8-4 in Al Golden's final season last year -- or Western Kentucky, who should have gotten their first-ever FBS bowl bid after 2011's second-place Sun Belt finish and 7-5 record.

Cases like Temple's and WKU's are why, personally speaking, I'm fine-n'-dandy with the Participation Trophy Bowl circuit; not every game is going to be riveting theater (and matchups like UCLA-Illinois or Louisville-N.C. State promise to be quite the opposite), but it's not like anyone's required to watch. Should the seniors on that UL-Lafayette team we saw celebrating like they'd collectively won the Publishers Clearing House sweepstakes Saturday night have been denied that once-in-not-even-most-people's-lifetimes experience just because a few college football diehards don't want to risk being bored?

Is the long-since-antiquated notion that bowl berths are for no one but mid-major champions and the top handful of major-conference programs worth brilliant Hilltoppers' running back Bobby Rainey ending his career without a bowl appearance? Not if you ask me--if the players want to play them, the the local organizers want to host them, it's not my place (or any fan's) to say they shouldn't. The number of bowls is fine; the way the teams are selected could just use a little pro-winning-record tweaking. Besides, give it another month and there won't be any college football at all. I'll take whatever I can get at this stage, Belk Bowl included.

(That said, it would be outstanding if the NCAA also prohibited the exorbitant ticket guarantees that have turned bowl trips into a financial sinkhole for so many smaller schools, but that's a separate issue from the scheduling/eligibility question.)

Chip Patterson: I too would like to see limping 6-6 BCS conference team taken out of the bowl equation, particularly when there are dangerous Non-BCS teams that have been left out of postseason play in recent years. One way could be to change the requirements to 7-5, but this season I thought of another wrinkle.

Instead of changing the bowl eligibility record/win total, add a stipulation that requires a team to finish .500 or better in league play. Many times, the 6-6 team that fails to show up for a bowl game has struggled down the stretch and enters the postseason with little-to-no momentum. If schools are going to benefit from conference tie-ins, make them perform in conference play to earn that right. A 6-6 team with a 3-5 conference record likely is not playing their best football at the end of the season, and might be a part of one of the dud bowl games we have seen recently.

I would also prefer to move the "gutter" bowl games back before the BCS and traditional New Years Day games. That stretch of bowls leading up to the National Championship Game is one of the places where we find unattractive matchups and lose college football excitement after the blitz of New Years Day. If those games were moved back before the New Year and the title game was pushed back to Jan 4-5, it would arguably be a better spot for college football to capitalize on the nation's interest. Not only does the average fan have to wait, but they have to be teased with games that would be better consumed in pieces during a Dec. 28 doubleheader.

Adam Jacobi: It's important to keep in mind that most of these lowest-tier bowls are media-owned entities, which were created and staged every year because from a media perspective, live televised FBS college football is more lucrative than anything else that could be aired in the middle of a December week. As such, if you want to get rid of these bowls, you had better come up with something that produces higher ratings for that network instead, otherwise, no amount of hand-wringing about the quality of the teams playing in bowls is going to result in any meaningful change. This is not a scandal or anything that should not be, mind you, because it does not negatively affect fairness of play or anything else of vital importance. It's merely the entity that stands to gain most from lowest-tier bowls being played, making sure that the lowest-tier bowls get played by owning and organizing them. That's just good business.

Moreover, if by some chance these lowest-tier bowls happen to disappear, as much as we're tired of seeing a 6-6 (3-5) BCS-conference team get into the postseason, let's not pretend that that team's going to be the first against the wall. It's going to be the also-rans of the MAC, WAC, C-USA, and every other non-AQ conference, because 90% of the time, those non-AQ schools draw lower ratings than their BCS-level counterparts. The Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl between UCLA and Illinois is going to suck, but if we're being honest about what bowl organizers really want out of a team that they invite, UCLA and Illinois are going to keep getting bowl invitations over even 8-win teams like Tulsa, Toledo, or Louisiana Tech.

So if you're asking me what I would change about the bowl system, I wouldn't possibly know where or how to begin. The bowl system is a product of media desires and inequality in FBS football, so if you want the bowl system to be any different, you'd better figure out a way to fix either the media landscape or the college football landscape first, and well... good luck with that.

Tom Fornelli: What if we replace the mid-week December games with gladiator like competitions? In which players from each school battle each other to the death. The loser, obviously, dies and frees up a scholarship for the school. The winner gets extra credit in any class of his choosing!

WHO WOULDN'T WATCH?

Adam Jacobi: Well, that would certainly be heartbreaking for everyone involved.

I wouldn't mind it if the sponsors (or bowl organizers or the stadium) had a little bit of leeway in ground rules for these games. These are silly games anyway (unless I'm supposed to take something called the Beef O'Brady's Bowl completely seriously all of a sudden), so why shouldn't the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl be played with literally a giant potato for a football? Field goals in the Holiday Bowl worth 4 points if they're from more than 45 yards out? Fine by me! Special uniforms in the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl designed to look like boxes of Kraft Macaroni & Cheese? OF COURSE we should be doing that.

So yeah, as long as we're going to have ultimately trivial exhibitions end the seasons of so many teams, we might as well make said trivial exhibitions unique in ways that go beyond mere branding.

Tom Fornelli: These ideas have my full support.  Can you imagine how much better the Orange Bowl would be if they were using an orange instead of a football?

Chip Patterson: Did they change tires on car at half time of the Meineke Car Care Bowl? If not they should.  Same goes for the Belk Bowl. I think instead of a coin toss there should be a Dockers shopping spree to determine who gets the ball first.

Adam Jacobi: And if Hooters got involved, there would be... lots of wings available for attending fans to eat. And that is all.

To chime in on the bowl schedule debate, or offer your own changes; "Like" us on Facebook and let us know what you think.

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Posted on: December 21, 2011 1:23 pm
Edited on: December 21, 2011 1:53 pm
 

Everett Withers: 'I'm headed to Ohio State'

Posted by Chip Patterson

After ongoing speculation regarding both Everett Withers' future and the makeup of Urban Meyer's new staff at Ohio State, North Carolina's interim head coach confirmed he will be in Columbus for the 2012 season.

Withers was a guest on The David Glenn Show (listen to audio here) on Wednesday, and confirmed that being a head coach was a goal of his for "at least seven or eight years." But Withers appeared to have no trouble putting that goal on hold for the moment considering the opportunities in Columbus.

"At this present time I'm headed to Ohio State to be the assistant head coach and co-defensive coordinator," Withers confirmed. "For obvious reasons, to have the opportunity to work on a staff with Coach [Urban] Meyer and to learn and grow with him and what he's starting at Ohio State. It's a great opportunity, a great challenge for me, and I'm looking forward to it."

Withers took over in Chapel Hill after Butch Davis was dismissed just days before the opening of 2011 training camp, and led the Tar Heels to a 7-5 regular season record. As the interim head coach, Withers was a candidate for the full-time head coaching position. Athletic director Bubba Cunningham interviewed the Tar Heels' former defensive coordinator, but eventually hired Southern Miss head coach Larry Fedora as the next head coach.

Withers will coach the Tar Heels in the Independence Bowl against Missouri on Dec. 26. As interim head coach, Withers stressed the importance of this team's fourth-straight postseason trip and the opportunity for the school's second-straight bowl victory. The Tar Heels have not won back-to-back bowl games since the 1997-1998 seasons, during the transition from Mack Brown to Carl Torbush.

Withers' is expected to share the defensive coordinator duties with Ohio State's current interim head coach, Luke Fickell. Fickell was given the opportunity to stay on staff by Urban Meyer, though he has interviewed for the open head coaching position at Pittsburgh. Withers has had numerous stops as a defensive assistant before arriving in Chapel Hill, notably including stints with Texas and the Tennessee Titans of the NFL.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: December 20, 2011 5:54 pm
Edited on: December 20, 2011 6:05 pm
 

Iowa RB Coker suspended for Insight Bowl

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Marcus Coker, Iowa's leading rusher on the season, will not be joining the team as it travels to the Insight Bowl to face Oklahoma on December 30. The school announced on Tuesday that Coker had been suspended from the team after violating an unspecified policy in the school's Student-Athlete Code of Conduct.

Coker was the workhorse of the Iowa offense in 2011, rushing 281 times for 1384 yards and 15 touchdowns. He also caught 21 passes for 157 yards. Coker led the Hawkeyes in rushing in each of their last 11 games, and ranked second in the Big Ten in rushing yards (behind Montee Ball) while placing third in rushing touchdowns (behind Ball and Denard Robinson).

Incidentally, it was a teammate's suspension going into the Insight Bowl in 2010 that gave Coker the breakout performance of his freshman year. With starter Adam Robinson suspended after "failing to comply with team policies," Iowa turned to Coker in its game against Missouri, and Coker responded with a scintillating performance: 33 carries, 219 yards, two touchdowns, and several broken tackles.

The Hawkeyes' first option at tailback in Coker's place would have been freshman Mika'il McCall, but McCall was suspended for the team's season finale at Nebraska for a violation of team rules and remains suspended, according to the Iowa athletic department. Additionally, even if McCall had been eligible to participate, he suffered a serious ankle injury in the season opener against Tennessee Tech; since the injury he has seen two carries -- the second of which was a lost fumble.

So without its top two running backs, Iowa has De'Andre Jackson, a redshirt freshman who has rushed for 79 yards on 18 carries in mop-up duty, and the athletic but smallish true freshman Jordan Canzeri, who has nine rushes for 56 yards. Damon Bullock, another true freshman, has rushed for 22 yards on eight carries, but seven of those came against Louisiana-Monroe and he has not seen action at RB since. Iowa may also turn to walk-on junior Jason White, who has split time between safety and running back in his time at Iowa and has three rushes for 12 yards this season. 



Get all the latest updates on Iowa and Oklahoma at the Insight Bowl Pregame. 

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Posted on: December 20, 2011 4:23 pm
 

Meyer, Smith release statements on NCAA sanctions

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Statement from Ohio State athletic director Gene Smith:

“We are surprised and disappointed with the NCAA’s decision,” said Gene Smith, Ohio State’s Athletics Director and Associate Vice President. “However, we have decided not to appeal the decision because we need to move forward as an institution. We recognize that this is a challenging time in intercollegiate athletics. Institutions of higher education must move to higher ground, and Ohio State embraces its leadership responsibilities and affirms its long-standing commitment to excellence in education and integrity in all it does.

“My primary concern, as always, is for our students, and this decision punishes future students for the actions of others in the past,” said Smith. “Knowing our student-athletes, however, I have no doubt in their capacity to turn this into something positive – for themselves and for the institution. I am grateful to our entire Buckeye community for their continued support.”

“All of us at Ohio State are determined to ensure that our compliance programs and protocols are best in class,” said Smith. “We will assume a leadership role in representing our university and its values.

“It is important to remember that Ohio State has one of the nation’s largest self supporting athletics programs, with students succeeding both in competition and in the classroom,” said Smith. “We have more than 1,000 students who compete in 36 intercollegiate sports, and the overall grade-point average of our student-athletes is just over 3.0. During the last two years, the University has had more student-athletes named to the Academic All-Big Ten Team than any other school. Further, Ohio State finished second in last year’s Directors’ Cup, which recognizes the best athletics programs in the country.”

Statement from Ohio State head coach Urban Meyer:

“I agreed to become the Head Football Coach at The Ohio State University because Shelley and I are Ohio natives, I am a graduate of this wonderful institution and served in this program under a great coach. I understand the academic and athletic traditions here and will give great effort to continue those traditions.

“It is still my goal to hire excellent coaches, recruit great student-athletes who want to be a part of this program and to win on and off the field. The NCAA penalties will serve as a reminder that the college experience does not include the behavior that led to these penalties. I expect all of us to work hard to teach and develop young student-athletes to grow responsibly and to become productive citizens in their communities upon graduation.” 

 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com