Tag:Big XII
Posted on: October 14, 2010 11:30 pm
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Kansas is just about as bad as it gets

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Kansas State 59, Kansas 7. Good heavens. Chase Coffman goes 15-16 for 184 yards, and KSU rushes for 286 on 41 carries. That's 7 yards a pop (6.98, if you're being pedantic), homes. 

Meanwhile, KU's just a mess, and the fact that this team beat Georgia Tech is just mind-boggling. How do you beat GT then lose to Baylor by 48? How?!

Here's the challenge: name three BCS teams worse than Kansas right now. We'll give you Duke. We'll even give you Washington State, even though it might not be true. Name a third. Name one that wouldn't beat this Kansas team by at least a touchdown. We dare you.

Posted on: October 13, 2010 10:44 pm
 

Texas wisely retires Colt McCoy's No. 12 jersey

Posted by Adam Jacobi

So, Colt McCoy is getting his number retired by the Texas Longhorns this weekend. This is a good thing! I worry that McCoy's legacy is going to be measured primarily on his lack of a Heisman Trophy or National Championship, and that's pretty unfair for one of the most productive quarterbacks in college football history. Here's a quick rundown of his accomplishments, helpfully compiled by Texas partisans Barking Carnival:

- 45 wins
- 13,253 passing yards
- 112 passing TDs
- 1589 yards rushing, 20 TDs
- Two BCS Bowls
- Big XII Offensive Player of the Year
- First Team All American by Associated Press
- Johnny Unitas Golden Arm Award
- Davey O’Brien Award
- Archie Manning Award
- Maxwell Award
- Walter Camp Award

Texas may never see a quarterback accomplish as much as McCoy did, so the notion that he might not deserve to be among such college football legends as Vince Young, Tommy Nobis, Bobby Layne, Earl Campbell, and Ricky Williams seems, to me, absurd.

Extra credit goes to Texas for going forward with this ceremony as possible: while normally a number retirement like this can safely wait a good five years or so, word just came out that McCoy is probably starting for the Cleveland Browns this week. Behind the Browns' offensive line. Against the Pittsburgh Steelers. So McCoy may as well enjoy one last day of glory before he's ripped limb from limb on Sunday. He will be missed.

Posted on: August 31, 2010 11:53 am
Edited on: September 1, 2010 2:39 pm
 

Nebraska takes clandestine road to the Big Ten

Posted by Adam Jacobi

The Omaha World-Herald published a great piece yesterday about the path Nebraska took en route to joining the Big Ten. It's a long read, to be sure, but it's less romance novel and more spy thriller. There's clandestine meetings, coded statements, and even an unnamed tipster who gets the ball rolling. Here's one snippet: Because [Nebraska athletic director Tom] Osborne is a well-known figure who tends to attract attention, it was agreed he and the chancellor would fly separately. [Nebraska Chancellor Harvey] Perlman was joined by Joel Pedersen, the university's general counsel. Few on any of their staffs knew the reason for their travel. 

After staying overnight in a city and eating breakfast separately to preserve their low profile, Perlman and Osborne received cell calls summoning them to meet a car outside. They then rode to a rural location about an hour outside the city. 

They were greeted by Delany, Big Ten Deputy Commissioner Brad Traviolia and the conference's legal counsel. 

One thing that becomes clear from Jim Delany's behavior throughout this process is that even though tradition isn't much of a factor in Delany's large-scale decision-making, identity is still critically important. After all, Delany bucked trends with the inception of the Big Ten Network and may tinker with the Michigan-Ohio State rivalry, but when it comes down to adding another member to the conference, saying things like "we try to do things the right way" and "some things are more important than money" is still enough to send Delany's heart aflutter.

Big XII commissioner Dan Beebe and Texas president William Powers declined interview requests, and that's a shame, because their sides of the story would have been fascinating. They were the primary sources of pressure on Nebraska, after all, and now that Nebraska is in the process of bailing, some reflections on the situation from their end would be worth our attention. All in due time, probably.
 
 
 
 
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