Tag:Candy Scandal
Posted on: September 30, 2011 1:05 pm
Edited on: September 30, 2011 1:06 pm
 

Candy scandal reaches Kansas

Posted by Tom Fornelli

There's trouble looming on the horizon for college football, a problem that threatens to tear the game apart from within. No, it's not conference realignment, television, the BCS or recruiting scandals. 

It's candy.

Last year our own Adam Jacobi blew the doors off a giant candy scandal taking place at Hawaii, but nobody thought much of it. "It's all the way out there in Hawaii," people said. "It's barely even a state." Yes, well, your apathy has cost you, America, because now the growing candy problem in college football has hit us right in the heartland.

In Kansas.
Kansas assistant coach David Beaty has given his receivers two additional reasons to block hard this season: competition and chocolate.

Beaty has kept track of his receivers’ knockdowns — the times when a player completely puts his opponent on the ground — on the dry-erase board in the receivers’ meeting room.

When a receiver gets a knockdown that leads to a scoring play, Beaty awards that player a king-sized candy bar at the position group’s meeting Sunday.

“You take pride in that,” KU sophomore Christian Matthews said, “and try to get the most candy.”
It may not seem like a big deal now, but how much longer until the world of college football recruiting devolves into a process of luring high school kids to school with candy? We're only months away from Lane Kiffin pulling up to a high school in an unmarked van offering peanut M&M's to top prospects to get them to come to USC.

Soon it will go from one candy bar to those 10-packs of the fun size kind, and eventually the bags of fun size bars. It will grow in size until eventually the sport of college football becomes extinct because every single high school football player in the United States develops diabetes and has to retire.

I implore the NCAA to put an end to this practice now, before it's too late.
 
 
 
 
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