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Tag:Dallas Cowboys
Posted on: January 13, 2012 1:45 pm
 

Kansas hires Dave Campo as defensive coordinator

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Charlie Weis has found his defensive coordinator.

Kansas announced in a press release on Friday that Dave Campo has been brought on to run the defense in Lawrence. The 64-year old Campo has plenty of coaching experience on both the collegiate and professional levels. He began his coaching career at Central Connecticut State in 1971 and made stops at schools like Pitt, Washington State, Boise State, Oregon State, Iowa State and Syracuse.

Campo was a secondary coach under Jimmy Johnson at Miami from 1987 to 1988 before moving on to the NFL with Johnson to the Dallas Cowboys.

He's been in the NFL ever since, and was even the head coach of the Cowboys for three years from 2000 to 2002. After losing his job there he moved on to the Cleveland Browns and Jacksonville Jaguars before returning to Dallas to coach the secondary the last four years.

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Posted on: December 14, 2011 3:44 pm
 

Les Miles "not interested" in Miami Dolphins job

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

When the South Florida Sun-Sentinel listed Les Miles as one of the leading candidates for the now-vacant Miami Dolphins head coaching job Monday, it seemed like something of a reach, not just for the paper's reasoning (that NCAA "sanctions could be on their way"*) but because Miles has never been in a better position in Baton Rouge. He's on the verge of his second national title and first perfect season, all with a stunningly young team that features underclassmen in any number of key positions. He's not just enjoying his best campaign yet; he could be on the verge of an out-and-out dynasty.

But just to put any potential rumors to bed for good, Miles had LSU spokesman Michael Bonnette issue a statement on his behalf Wednesday that disavowed any interest in the Dolphins position.  

"He said he is full steam ahead for the national championship and not interested in any other job," Bonnette said. "He wanted everyone to know that he is not interested in the Miami job." 

Miles does have some minor NFL coaching experience, having coached the Dallas Cowboys tight ends from 1998-2000, and we've argued in this space before that his ability to succeed at the "next level" shouldn't be dismissed.

But whatever positives there might be for Miles in making the move to the pro grame, right now they seem entirely dwarfed by the positives waiting for him in his current position. This might not be the last NFL job connected to Miles this offseason, but we don't expect Miles's response to ever be any different.

*We're assuming this is in reference to the Willie Lyles scandal. But we're not 100 percent sure.
Posted on: September 28, 2011 1:16 pm
 

Why Les Miles could succeed as an NFL head coach

Posted by Jerry Hinnen



No, we haven't done any scientific surveys or hired Gallup to conduct a poll. But we have an edcuated guess as to how most college football fans would react to this CBSSports.com Mike Freeman report that several NFL teams are looking at Les Miles as a serious head coaching candidate. And that reaction is: WHAAAAA?

Even amongst college football fans -- heck, even amongst LSU fans -- Miles is rarely viewed as some kind of coaching savant. There's the late-game clock mismanagement. The years of underachieving offenses. The inability to gets his uber-talented teams over the hump to an undefeated season, national title or not. (Say it with us, Miles skeptics: "You can't spell Les Miles without two L's.")

But even if you aren't impressed by Miles' record -- and with a national title, two SEC West titles, and four seasons of 11 wins or more in only six tries, you should be -- the wildly successful start to his team's 2011 season should be evidence enough that he's doing something right. Several somethings, in fact, somethings that could very well make Miles a success even after making the leap to the NFL.

And if you've missed them along the way, these are them:

He coaches to win. Sounds simple, right? But truckloads of coaches base their in-game decisions on not losing rather than winning, and the end result is that their record in close games hews to the .500 mark you'd expect when allowing luck to be the deciding factor. Not Miles: whether it's throwing the famous last-second bomb to beat Auburn in 2007, calling the last-minute fake field goal that helped down Florida in 2010, or a dozen other examples, Miles is committed to calls that give his team a chance to win, not just a shot at avoiding a loss.

The proof is in the pudding of his record in close games: 22-9 in his six seasons in games decided by a touchdown or less. In a league by nature even more conservative than the college game, Miles's go-for-broke approach could pay even bigger dividends.

He surrounds himself with the right coaches. Not every move Miles has made on his staff has been gold; after defensive coordinator Bo Pelini left to become Nebraska's head coach following the 2007 national championship. Miles promoted Doug Mallory and Bradley Dale Peveto as co-coordinators to fill that spot ... and promptly watched the Tiger defense take a massive step backwards in a disappointing 8-5 2008 season.

But Miles didn't wait around to see if Mallory and Peveto could get it together. He promptly went out and hired respected ex-Tennessee coordinator John Chavis, and the LSU defense has never looked back. Even many of Miles's less popular hires have paid dividends--look no further than Steve Kragthorpe, the widely reviled former Louisville head coach brought on as offensive coordinator this offseason to general disdain. But it's Kragthorpe having the last laugh: former pick-six machine Jarrett Lee is playing the best quarterback of his life and the Tigers have been ruthless in the red zone.

Assuming Miles learned the pro game well enough from his two-year stint with the Dallas Cowboys to have an idea of who he'd want on his NFL staff, that same eye for coaching talent should serve him well.

His special teams are dynamite. For years, LSU has boasted some of the best-coached, most consistent and most explosive special teams units in the SEC. Much of that success has been chalked up to the Tigers' string of top-notch return men: Trindon Holliday, Chad Jones, Patrick Peterson. But after watching Morris Claiborne emphatically end West Virginia's second-half rally with a kickoff return for touchdown last Saturday (and Tyrann Mathieu do much the same to Oregon with his forced fumble and reutnr-for-touchdown on punt coverage), it's time to acknowledge that LSU's special teams success runs deeper than just the guys asked to field the ball.

He connects with his players. It's not worth belaboring the point already made by Freeman in his report, but no one has ever accused Miles's teams of not playing their hardest for him, nor Miles himself of being unable to reach recruits or manage his star players. Motivating and focusing college kids is a very different task than doing the same for seasoned professionals, but Miles's homespun charisma and willingness to trust his players to win games (see the first item on this list) should go a long way towards helping him make the adjustment.

Miles would no doubt have a lot to learn about the NFL -- two years as a tight end coach doesn't seem like an ideal level of pro experience for someone being asked to take over his own team -- but he appears to have a foundation in place that would serve him well should he make the leap. With NFL teams apparently willing to offer him the chance, the question is: will he?

Posted on: June 24, 2011 11:33 am
Edited on: June 24, 2011 4:21 pm
 

Barry Switzer: Wine Baron

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Barry Switzer has never been shy about his childhood or what his father did to make money. I mean, this is a man who named his autobiography Bootlegger's Boy after all. Well, now it seems that Switzer is getting into the family business, but he's doing it legitimately this time around. As Berry Tramel informs us, Switzer has launched Switzer Family Vineyards. 

Switzer went into business with Andrew Hoxsey, one of the leading winemakers in California’s Napa Valley. Jeff Coyle — the son of two-time OU all-Big Eight end Ross Coyle (1957-58) — now is vice president of Republic National Distributing Co. and helped broker the deal.

“We’re going to work about 500 cases a year,” Coyle said. “We sold 112 (wholesale) in three days.” The wine is being marketed in Oklahoma and Texas. A single Iowa steakhouse ordered 56 cases. Outlets in Nebraska have inquired, too.

Coyle said the trucks delivering the wine just now are reaching Oklahoma.

Switzer says that he truly developed his love of wine while working for the Dallas Cowboys, where he would spend the night before a game having dinner with Jerry Jones and drinking expensive wine. 

As for Barry's childhood experience with his father, the label on each bottle of wine from his vineyard gives a deeper glimpse into how Switzer was raised.

“My rural home in Arkansas was a shotgun house built in 1893. You could shoot a shotgun through the front door, out the back, not hit a thing. Hallway down the middle with three rooms on each side. No electricity, no plumbing, heat from a wood stove, light from coal oil lamps. There was something special about that old house, and I think there is something special about our wine. I know, since I happen to be a bootlegger’s boy. Enjoy! Barry Switzer.”

The house I grew up in was basically the same way, except that if you shot a gun through the front door it wouldn't hit anything until it got to my bedroom in the back. Now I'm wondering why my parents were trying to get me killed. Oh, and we had electricity and plumbing, but that all seems rather trivial now that I realize I was in the line of fire.


Posted on: May 23, 2011 12:58 pm
Edited on: May 23, 2011 2:49 pm
 

Patterson, Frogs thinking big with move East

By Brett McMurphy
CBSSports.com Senior Writer

PONTE VERDA BEACH, Fla. – Being that this was his first official Big East function, you’ll have to excuse TCU coach Gary Patterson for not realizing shorts, and not long pants, are the preferred attire in this beach town.

Still, it wasn’t Patterson’s slacks, but the bling on his right ring finger that stood out the most – the Horned Frogs’ 2011 Rose Bowl championship ring.

And by joining the Big East in 2012, Patterson believes the Horned Frogs will have an easier road to make even more BCS bowls. Leaving the Mountain West after this season for the Big East will be a huge boost for the Horned Frogs in recruiting.

“[In the Mountain West] we weren’t an [automatic] qualifying conference and [now we can] get a chance to get into a BCS game without going undefeated,” Patterson said. “And then for us, the TV sets [the Big East reaches 30 percent of the nation’s television sets] by being able to go east.

“That’s the same reason the Dallas Cowboys did it. Geographically it doesn’t make any difference to come to [play] Philadelphia. That’s how they became – quote – ‘America’s Team’ because they became seen so much. We’ll see how that works.”

So far last year’s announcement of TCU moving to the Big East has already made an impact.

“I think there will be [excitement moving to the Big East],” Patterson said. “The excitement is the new recruiting class, they’re the ones the Big East will have an effect on and maybe the class coming in. We haven’t really talked about it. Our whole thing is getting a chance to win one more championship in the league we’re in.”

Patterson said he didn’t think anyone was considering them “a lame duck” in their final season in the Mountain West.

“You have to play the games,” Patterson said. “Schedule-wise, except for the Boise game [which was changed from a TCU home game to a Boise State home game by the league] … the Mountain West could have played it anyway you wanted to as far as the league was concerned.

“We don’t get a return game one way or another [with the other league opponents]. The only thing I’m worried about is making sure our stadium is ready for the first home game.”

Patterson said attending the Big East’s spring meetings gave him a chance to become more familiar with how the league operates.

“My whole premise was to get to know people [here], getting the lay of the ground work,” Patterson said. “I’m still loyal to the Mountain West. I get a chance to meet people and understand [how the league works] when we come into the league next spring.”

Posted on: April 25, 2011 3:51 pm
 

VIDEO: Michael Irvin addresses Miami locker room

Posted by Adam Jacobi

At the University of Miami, perhaps moreso than any other school, the football players stick around with the program long after their college careers are finished. If it's summer at Miami, guys like Clinton Portis, Jeremy Shockey, and Andre Johnson will be there at the university, doing their off-season training and imbuing the players with a sense of tradition and responsibility. It's pretty cool.

And yet for all the limitless pride and commitment to the program, there's one man who reps the U harder than anybody else, and that's Hall of Fame wide receiver/talker Michael Irvin, who won a national championship with the 'Canes in 1987 before heading to the Dallas Cowboys. Irvin's still in Miami, hosting a sports radio show, and as long as he's down there, he'll always have something to say to the team. So here's new head coach Al Golden bringing Irvin in to address the team before its annual spring game this weekend.

Look, if you can't get up for that, then football's obviously not your sport. It's my sport, though, and even though I'm not a Miami fan (I don't hate them or anything, they're just not my team), I'm still thisclose to ripping my shirt off and running down the street while throwing up the U. I don't really know what going shirtless would accomplish but it seems like a necessary step. Maybe I'll shave the U into my chest hair first. Wait, why am I still writing these things down? END POST! END POST!

Posted on: February 9, 2011 3:10 pm
Edited on: February 9, 2011 3:11 pm
 

UNC loses another D-line coach

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Here's something for you to ponder: which job has a shorter shelf life these days? Being Georgia's mascot, or coaching the defensive line at North Carolina? It seems like each gig is trying to one-up its counterpart. North Carolina makes the latest move with today's news that Brian Baker is leaving North Carolina to take a position with the Dallas Cowboys.

Baker just became the the defensive line coach in Chapel Hill four weeks ago, and he's the third person to have the job since the beginning of the 2010 season. Call it the Curse of John Blake if you like, because he was the man who had held on to the job before his dealings with agent Gary Wichard brought so many headaches to the Tar Heels earlier this season.

Charlie Coiner was the coach between both Baker and Blake.

As for why Baker is leaving, though he was hired four weeks ago, apparently he never signed a contract with the school. Then the Cowboys came along and made him an offer that included a "huge difference" in salaries, and he couldn't turn it down. Baker also said that his dream is still to be a college head coach some day, but he believes that going to Dallas will only help him achieve that dream.

Then there's the money, too. That doesn't hurt either.
Posted on: January 27, 2011 5:10 pm
Edited on: January 29, 2011 12:47 pm
 

BYU, TCU in talks to play at Cowboys Stadium

Posted by Tom Fornelli

As we are all well aware of now, TCU is scrambling to put together a schedule for 2011 after having Texas Tech drop a game between the two, and it looks like TCU will be staying in Texas to replace that game. A number of reports today say that TCU is currently engaged in talks with former Mountain West counterpart BYU about playing a game in Cowboys Stadium.

When the game will be played is a bit up in the air, as BYU already has twelve games scheduled in 2011. Since one of BYU's games is being played in Hawaii, however, the Cougars are allowed to schedule a thirteenth game next season. As of now the two open dates on BYU's schedule are October 29 and November 26. Odds are that November 26 is out of the question since it's on Thanksgiving weekend and the Cowboys traditionally play a home game on Thanksgiving, so preparing for two games in a matter of days would be a bit much.

So unless BYU rearranges the rest of its schedule, or drops another game, odds are if this matchup happens it'll be on October 29.

The game is not yet set in stone, though indications are that it should be announced in the coming days. According to TCU AD Chris Del Conte, TCU plans on releasing its 2011 schedule soon.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com