Tag:Darrell Hazell
Posted on: March 11, 2011 12:24 pm
Edited on: March 11, 2011 1:05 pm
 

Luke Fickell may fill in for Jim Tressel

Posted by Tom Fornelli

While we don't know what the NCAA and the Big Ten are going to do with Ohio State and Jim Tressel, we do know that the school itself has suspended Tressel for the first two games of the 2011 season against Akron and Toledo. Which means that Ohio State needs to figure out who will take over the role of head coach during those two games.

While there isn't exactly a rush to make a decision, and there's some uncertainty as to who would make the decision, the consensus in Columbus is that it will likely be co-defensive coordinator Luke Fickell.
With Tressel suspended for a major violation of NCAA rules, the Buckeyes will need to designate an acting coach for games in September against Akron and Toledo. The buzz has been building that the nod will go to co-defensive coordinator Luke Fickell.
Tressel used to have an assistant head coach, but that person, Darrell Hazell, left in December to become head coach at Kent State. Since then, speculation has been that Tressel would recommend Fickell for the position this spring. Fickell coaches linebackers and works with fellow coordinator Jim Heacock on the defensive game plan.
As is only natural at this point, the Columbus Dispatch also did a quick background check on Fickell and found that he's had only four minor rules violations in 10 years at Ohio State, and none since 2005. Which, in case you aren't completely aware of how many violations actually occur, is pretty good. Minor violations happen all the time as the NCAA has a whole lot of rules. Some make sense, and some are ridiculous, and plenty of coaches violate the rules without realizing it at the time.

What Fickell really has going for him, though, is that of the four minor rules violations he committed, he didn't wait eight months to report them.
Posted on: January 19, 2011 3:13 pm
 

Headset Reset: Five new faces in the MAC

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

"Headset Reset " is the College Football Blog's series reviewing the 22 new head coaches in the FBS and what they'll need to accomplish in their new jobs to succeed. In this edition: the five new head coaches in the MAC.

DON TREADWELL, Miami (Ohio) (pictured)

Why him? Because few assistant coaches in the country had a better 2010 than Treadwell, who turned a collection of average-looking talent into one of the Big Ten's most effective offenses at Michigan State and added a couple of victories as the Spartans' interim head coach to boot. For 2011, Treadwell needs to: capitalize on the momentum built by Mike Haywood's amazing 9-win turnaround in Oxford. A second straight MAC title isn't a necessity, but the pieces are in place for the kind of solid, winning season that would stamp the RedHawks as a contender for years to come. By 2014, Treadwell needs to have: won the MAC. With so much coaching turnover, there's a power vaccum at the top of the conference, and no reason Miami can't fill it. Chances Treadwell gets what he needs? Good-to-very good. Haywood left behind an excellent foundation and Treadwell's work in East Lansing suggests he's just the man to build upon it.

PETE LEMBO, Ball State

Why him? At just 40 years of age, Lembo already has 10 years of head coaching experience (all at the FCS level, no less) and just finished resuscitating a truly rotten Elon program. For 2011, Lembo needs to: just move the Cardinals in the right direction. Stan Parrish's dreadful two-season reign-of-error means Lembo has to get the program walking towards, say, not losing to Eastern Michigan before it runs towards bowls and league titles. By 2014, Lembo needs to have: put the Cardinals in position for a postseason berth; the Brady Hoke era showed it's far from impossible for the right coach. Chances Lembo gets what he needs? Not bad. BSU's not an easy gig, but Lembo's energy and FCS success mean he could be a sneakily good hire.

STEVE ADDAZIO, Temple

Why him? Not his efforts running the Florida offense, that's for sure, but his top-notch recruiting expertise, Northeast ties, and Urban Meyer -trained CEO skills won him the job all the same. For 2011, Addazio needs to: put together a coaching staff -- particularly at the coordinator positions -- that can take advantage of Addazio's good work on the recruiting trails. Maintaining Temple's perch near the top of the MAC East would be a nice signal that Al Golden's tenure wasn't a fluke, too. By 2014, Addazio needs to have: gotten the Owls back to a couple of bowl games; anything else would be a terrible waste of Golden's remarkable work. Chances Addazio gets what he needs? Better than you'd think. There's a reason Meyer tabbed Addazio as his replacement during his sabbatical; he's got the leadership skills necessary to head up a successful program ... if he can just find someone to call his plays for him.

DAVE DOEREN, Northern Illinois

Why him? NIU can't ask for a whole lot more than a long-time successful Big Ten defensive coordinator fresh off a visit to the Rose Bowl. For 2011, Doeren needs to: win the MAC? Those are high expectations for a first-time head coach, but the Huskies were the league's best team in 2010 and their offense returns almost entirely intact. By 2014, Doeren needs to have: won the MAC, no question mark. With the offensive talent left behind by Jerry Kill and Doeren's defensive acumen, the Huskies should find a way to finish what they started in 2010. Chances Doeren gets what he needs? Solid; none of the other new MAC coaches steps into a situation quite this friendly, and Doeren's defensive pedigree is promising.

DARRELL HAZELL, Kent State

Why him? No one the Golden Flashes could have hired knows the Ohio recruiting scene better than the longtime Buckeye receivers coach and recruiting ace. For 2011, Hazell needs to: find a difference-maker or two. KSU's been close to getting over the bowl hump, going 5-7 each of the past two seasons; if Hazell can recruit just a handful of actual play-makers, he could get them there in short order. By 2014, Hazell needs to have: reached the postseason. It would be a huge milestone for woebegone program that's had just two winning seasons since 1977, and has never played in a bowl as an FBS program. Chances Hazell gets what he needs? Like Addazio, it'll depend on who Hazell can hire for his staff, since he has no coordinating experience. But the talent level in Kent should definitely rise on his watch.

Posted on: December 20, 2010 9:25 am
 

Kent State to hire Ohio State's Hazell

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

As the old saying goes: if you can't beat 'em, hire 'em away.

So with the rest of Ohio now 0-for-the-last-89-years against the neighborhood bully in Columbus, it's no surprise that Kent State (out of Kent, Ohio, natch) has looked to the staff of Ohio State for their next head coach, Buckeye receivers coach and assistant head coach Darrell Hazell. Hazell is due to be announced as the new coach of the Golden Flashes at a press conference set for 3 p.m. EST later today, having won the job over co-finalists Curt Cignetti, the Alabama wide receivers coach, and Bobby Kennedy, the Texas receivers coach. (One way or another, safe to say the Golden Flashes were going to get some high-quality receiving coaching next year.)

With Hazell installed at Kent, Pete Lembo at Ball State, and Dave Doeren at Northern Illinois, only Temple and Miami (OH) are still looking for coaches following what might be called the Great MAC Coaching Upheaval of 2010.

Hazell comes to Kent having been with Jim Tressel's Buckeyes since 2004 and with experience as the assistant head coach at both Ohio State and his previous stop at Rutgers. But the likely decisive factor in his hire is his knowledge of the rich Ohio recruiting scene, honed not only from his years under Tressel but his three-year stint as the Oberlin College offensive coordinator from 1989-1991.

And what team just-so-happens to be that last Ohio team to beat Ohio State? Oberlin, by a 7-6 score back in 1921 . If Hazell can reproduce anything remotely like that kind of magic, he won't be at Kent for long.

 
 
 
 
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