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Tag:Dez Bryant
Posted on: July 15, 2011 3:11 am
Edited on: July 20, 2011 10:20 pm
 

Report: Feldman suspended for role in Leach book

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Mike Leach's new book, Swing Your Sword, was released Thursday, and Leach's co-author on the book was famed scribe Bruce Feldman (The Meat Market, 'Cane Mutiny). Small problem: Feldman also writes for ESPN.com's Insider section, and that may prove to be something of an issue when Leach's book contains a litany of complaints against ESPN on-air personality Craig James for his role in getting Leach fired from Texas Tech.

And yet, according to reports, Feldman was given the green light to proceed with the book, and he never engaged in any promotion for the book before or after its release. Non-issue, then, right? Well, wait:

ESPN college football writer Bruce Feldman was suspended indefinitely during a conference call with three ESPN officials this morning.

[They] informed Feldman today that he has been banned from writing for any ESPN entity, is forbidden from appearing on any ESPN platform, is not allowed to Tweet from his Twitter account nor participate in any promotion of a recently-released book in which Feldman played a role.

Such is the report from Sports by Brooks, anyway, and thus far there's been nothing to indicate the report isn't accurate. Feldman, who's normally a fairly active tweeter, has been silent since Wednesday on his ESPN-branded Twitter account @BFeldmanESPN, and no other ESPN personalities are commenting on the matter.

Just about everybody else in the world is commenting, however, and "Bruce Feldman" became a trending topic fairly quickly Thursday night on Twitter. Twitterers made use of the #freebruce hashtag early and often, especially after Sports Illustrated writer Andy Staples canceled his ESPN Insider subscription in protest:

Now, since ESPN hasn't released its side of this story yet, and since all we're working on is one report from one media outlet, it would be premature and assumptive to rake ESPN over the coals for this decision at this point. All reports indicate that Feldman was given the go-ahead to help write this book before the ugliness between ESPN and Leach. So if there was some amendment (whether explicit or tacit) to the arrangement after ESPN became directly involved, obviously, that would be relevant information that hasn't been released yet. We're all operating with limited information, and rather than build 1,500-word arguments based on assumptions that could be disproved by a single PR release before sunrise Friday, it's probably best to wait and learn more from the parties involved.

That all said, it's worth noting that, generally speaking, suspensions from organizations (whether sporting, media or otherwise) rarely improve the product being put out. Dez Bryant getting banned by the NCAA for the rest of his senior season didn't make Oklahoma State or the Big 12 any better or more entertaining, for example, to say nothing of what the NCAA lost when it wouldn't let Ohio State RB Maurice Clarett or USC WR Mike Williams get drafted or come back and play after their second seasons out of high school in 2004. Rules are rules, but taking talent off the field makes what happens on the field worse.

Obviously, that's not to say that all suspensions or other disciplinary actions are inherently bad -- discipline is important, and to keep the examples in college football, nobody would argue that Lawrence Phillips didn't spend enough time off the Nebraska squad after his domestic assault charge during the 1995 season. So yes, clearly, suspensions or firings/dismissals serve a well-needed purpose.

Yet, based on what we know now, Feldman didn't do anything wrong. He helped write a book that a whole lot of people really wanted to see written, and it wasn't even that one about ESPN itself that so many past and present ESPN employees gave testimony for -- under their own names, no less.

No, instead, ESPN is apparently degrading its PR standing (to say nothing of its paid Insider product, to which Feldman actually contributes) in order to punish Feldman and push this notion of ESPN as a faultless company that virtually zero of its consumers actually believe. It's extremely difficult to find a benefit to the company itself in this decision. The product is worse. The public perception is worse. The journalistic freedom within is now demonstrably worse. Exactly what is ESPN trying to accomplish here?

The appearance is that Craig James used his position at ESPN to force enough public pressure on Leach to be ousted from Texas Tech, and is now using his position within ESPN to force Feldman from the ranks at Bristol. If either is inaccurate and James would like to see Leach or Feldman restored to their previous statuses, by all means, we'd be glad to document such a statement. If not, it's hard not to think that ESPN is being used as a bully pulpit, and if that means a college football world without heavy involvement from Leach and Feldman, then college football is worse off for it, and that's no role for ESPN or any other major college football media organization to hold.

Posted on: March 30, 2011 12:17 pm
Edited on: March 30, 2011 12:19 pm
 

OSU investigating claims in Dez Bryant lawsuit

Posted by Chip Patterson

Former Oklahoma State wide receiver Dez Bryant may have done more harm than good during his last year in Stillwater, being ruled permanently ineligible in October 2009 for lying to the NCAA about his relationship with Deion Sanders.  While Bryant sat on the sidelines, the Cowboys dropped three of their last six games and finished second in the Big 12 South in a down year for rival Oklahoma.

Now a recent lawsuit brought against Bryant may have more negative implications on the Oklahoma State football program, and these could be much more serious.  The lawsuit claims that the star wideout began receiving jewelry, tickets, and loans totaling more than $600,000 beginning in June 2009.  The Associated Press is reporting that Bryant was expected to pay back receipts by July 30, 2010 or "when he signs his first Marketing or Sports Contract."

"That's new information to us," said associate atheltic director Kevin Fite addressing the claims.  "It's somethign we are certaintly going to look at."

If Bryant did receive goods or loans while still eligible with intentions of paying them back when he turned professional, it is a pretty blantant violation of the NCAA amateur rules.  If it can be proven that Oklahoma State knew about the arrangements, they could face further prosecution from the NCAA.  Which is why there is no surprise they are acting so quickly to look into these claims.

Keep it here with CBSSports.com and the Eye On College Football for more as this develops


Posted on: January 19, 2011 12:55 pm
 

Ok St. loses assistant Brewer to Ole Miss

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

A major part of Oklahoma State's rampant offensive success the past several seasons has been head coach Mike Gundy's keen eye for spotting offensive-minded coaching talent. But after losing yet another offensive assistant to another program, it might be time to ask: has Gundy's eye been too keen for the Cowboys' own good?

Former Poke play-caller Larry Fedora was hired as Southern Miss's head coach. Fedora's one-time co-offensive coordinator Trooper Taylor just won a national title as Auburn's receivers coach. Dana Holgorsen spent just one brilliant season in Stillwater before agreeing to become West Virginia's head coach after a one-year apprenticeship. And as of today, Gundy's most recent receivers coach (and his 2008-2009 co-coordinator), Gunter Brewer, has also flown the coop; he's following his father's footsteps to Ole Miss.

As Kyle Veazey of the Clarion-Ledger reports, it sounds like Brewer was just waiting for the right time to come back to same school where his father, Billy Brewer, once served as head coach:

“It’s good to always be coming home,” Brewer said. “So I’m looking forward to the journey. Done some outstanding things at Oklahoma State, and I hope to carry that over to Ole Miss and just expand on that.”

Brewer said he always tried to stay in touch with Ole Miss over the years to see if the timing would be right for an opportunity to join the Rebel staff. “When the opportunity arose, (Houston Nutt ) asked if I might be interested,” Brewer said. “And he was wanting to look at some things offensively that we’ve had success here at Oklahoma State and other places."

In this particular case, it's not that that success was what yanked Brewer out of Stillwater; without his family ties to Oxford, it seems clear he'd still be on Gundy's staff. Then again, it's also clear that if he hadn't put together the kind of resume under Gundy he did -- Brewer was the position coach for All-Americans like Dez Bryant and Justin Blackmon -- Nutt wouldn't have bothere reciprocating Brewer's interest in the first place.

At some point, the Cowboys have to wonder just what it takes to keep their offensive staff intact for more than a year. (With T. Boone Pickens footing the bill, you wouldn't think salaries would be an issue.) The price of success is always high, but for whatever reason, it's seemed particularly steep at Oklahoma State.
Posted on: October 28, 2010 12:04 pm
 

OSU confident no violations to come

Posted by Tom Fornelli

While Oklahoma State has already announced that wide receiver Justin Blackmon will be suspended for this week's game against Kansas State following his DUI arrest on Monday , and Blackmon has issued an apology, there still is the question of how Blackmon came across the tickets to Monday night's Dallas Cowboys game at JerryWorld.

JerryWorld is an expensive place to see a football game, one of the most expensive in the NFL, and given all the troubles going on throughout college football about contact between players and agents, it's a natural question to ask.  How did Blackmon get those tickets, and will it result in any kind of NCAA violation for the school?

Well, at the moment, the school is pretty confident that Blackmon did nothing wrong to acquire the seats.
Dallas Cowboy tickets are believed to have been provided to Blackmon and his friends by the father of a former OSU player. Cowboy athletic director Mike Holder would not comment on the Blackmon situation, but OSU sources indicate that athletic department officials are confident that no extra-benefit NCAA violation has occurred.

Which may be true, but considering everything Oklahoma State went through with Dez Bryant last season -- who happens to be a former OSU player that plays for the Cowboys, but this is just my brain connecting dots -- the last thing they want is the NCAA sniffing around campus right now.
 
 
 
 
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