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Tag:Dick Baddour
Posted on: September 18, 2011 2:13 pm
Edited on: September 18, 2011 2:27 pm
 

Big East and ACC schools react to expansion

Posted by Chip Patterson

Pittsburgh and Syracuse have been accepted to the ACC.  It's been signed, sealed, and the process of Big East withdrawl will be the next challenge for the 13th and 14th schools in the Atlantic Coast Conference.  The move caught the Big East offguard, and provided a more certain future for the ACC's current schools.

The uncertain future of the Big East can be identified in the responses from other Big East member schools. Take, for example, this statement released by University of Connecticut President Susan Herbst.
"UConn is pour charter member of the BIG EAST and we have taken a lead role in the league's success over the years. However, it is my responsibility as President that we stay in constant communication and be actively involved in discussions with our counterparts from around the country to ensure the successful long-term future of our university's athletic program. The truth is that our teams will play competitive athletics at the highest level of excellence, wherever things land, and our central goals will be academic success and compliance, as always."
Those phrases about "constant communication" and "wherever things land" make it seem as though Connecticut is ready to flirt, if they have not already started to do so. USA Today cited an ACC official in reporting that the conference would be open to adding two more East Coast teams - and said Connecticut and Rutgers would be the candidates.

What about the reaction from the the current ACC members? Obviously the addition of the Panthers and Orange are a huge boost to an already prominent basketball reputation, but the greatest impact for each of the current member schools will not be associated with one particular sport. The ACC's current media deal with ESPN allows renegotiation in the event the ACC added members to the 12-team roster. The advantages of Pittsburgh and Syracuse have already been hinted at by many, particularly Maryland athletic director Kevin Anderson.

"From a regional standpoint, adding these two high-quality schools will enhance the marketing footbpring of the league," Anderson said in a prepared statement. "Both Pittsburgh and New York City will offer the conference new opportunities to attract fans in all our sports. We look forward to discussions about the future of the league and would encourage future expansion."

Anderson hit the nail on the head for the ACC's current members: marketing. The conference will now get to expand their brand into two major markets that where there was previously no ACC presence. Increasing the marketing opportunities will raise the value of the product - and thus raise the pay day each school could expect from a renegotiated media deal. Anderson not only gave his approval for the addition of the two new markets, but has even given his thumbs up on the move to 16.

In a teleconference with the media on Sunday, ACC commissioner said they would not be "philosophically opposed" to further expansion, but stressed his content with the current 14-team lineup. Judging by the reports, it seems the conference will sit back and see who moves next. Conference realignment has become a board game, with players strategizing and analyzing each possible move. The ACC has used their turn, and now will likely see how the Big East and Big 12 schools react in the next few weeks.

Texas and Oklahoma will likely step up next, and the college football landscape will wait - and react - to whatever move they choose to make.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: September 17, 2011 4:21 pm
Edited on: September 17, 2011 4:23 pm
 

UNC AD: ACC expansion 'right thing to do'

Posted by Chip Patterson

Conference realignment accelerated on Saturday, with CBSSports.com's Brett McMurphy breaking the news that Pittsburgh and Syracuse are "likely gone" to the ACC.

Each school individually submitted letters of application to the ACC, according to high ranking ACC and Big East officials. The news comes a week after the ACC presidents meeting, where the schools unanimously voted to raise the conference exit fee to $20 million. The exit fee was previously between $12 million and $15 million.

While Big East commissioner John Marinatto wouldn't comment on the reports while attending West Virginia's victory against Maryland in College Park, North Carolina athletic director Dick Baddour weighed in on the ACC's reported expansion.

"It's obvious that the world is turning upside down and we want the ACC to be in a position where we are strong," Baddor said. "It's absolutely the right thing to do."

This would be the second time the conference has expanded in the last decade, after adding Virginia Tech, Miami, and Boston College in the 2004 and 2005 seasons. The combination of adding expansion with the raised exit fee would make it appear that the ACC has positioned itself to survive any poaching from the SEC - which still has not identified a 14th member to balance the divisions after Texas A&M's addition.

Keep up with the latest college football news from around the country. From the regular season all the way through the bowl games, CBSSports.com has you covered with this daily newsletter. | Preview
Posted on: August 8, 2011 2:29 pm
Edited on: August 8, 2011 3:39 pm
 

Report: UNC boosters considering lawsuit

Posted by Chip Patterson

UPDATE: Robbi Pickeral, who authored the initial News and Observer report, says that UNC has received the information request from the lawyers of the football boosters.  School still has no official comment. 


Things got even crazier on Monday in the ongoing drama that has become the North Carolina football program. According to a local report, a group of North Carolina football boosters who agreed to help fund a recent Kenan Stadium expansion are exploring possible legal action against chancellor Holden Thorp.

The identities of the boosters involved has not been made public, but one of the attorneys representing the group told the Raleigh News and Observer he plans to file a public information request asking for all correspondence between the Chancellor and other school officials.

Don Brown, of Charlotte, N.C., is one of five lawyers (all UNC graduates) that have taken the case pro bono. For the first time in the stadium's 84 year history, both end zones are now bowled in thanks to the construction of the "Carolina Student-Athlete Center for Excellence." The new service building for the athletic department also brought 2,980 new seats, a club level, and suites that can be priced at $50,000 per year. There have been reports that donors have asked for refunds since Butch Davis' dismissal, which were denied.

"I can tell you, everybody that we represent is furious about the timing of Butch Davis' firing," Brown told the News and Observer in a phone interview. "They feel like their investment was based on Butch Davis being the head coach…and the public reassurances over the past year that he would remain the coach…They want answers."

A UNC spokesman said that as of 11:30 a.m. on Monday the school had received no FOIA request, and there is no official comment on the issue.

The group of enraged boosters is said to be of different contribution levels, and it is not clear exactly what they hope to gain from pursuing legal action. Brown emphasized in his interview with the News and Observer that they are only "seeking information" right now. One recent precedent was Connecticut booster Robert Burtonwho asked for his $3 million back from the school and requested to have his name taken off the Burton Family Football Complex. After causing quite a public stir, Burton and the school were eventually back on good terms and no drastic action was taken. The legalities of donations (particularly ones earmarked for a project like the Blue Zone) could get particularly hairy and difficult to reclaim in a court of law. It could be argued that this is a case of upset boosters, who simply do not know another way to fire back at an administration which they feel has wronged them.
Posted on: July 5, 2011 3:18 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2011 3:35 pm
 

Former UNC DE McAdoo suing school, NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

Ruled permanently ineligible last November, former North Carolina defensive end Michael McAdoo has filed a lawsuit against the school and NCAA seeking his reinstatement.

McAdoo's ineligibility is tied to the academic-related allegations against the North Carolina football program. He was one of the 13 players who missed the season opener against LSU and remained on the sidelines awaiting word from the school or NCAA until he was ruled ineligible near the end of the season.

More on the suit from McAdoo's lawyer, via InsideCarolina.com
“All told, McAdoo has been declared permanently ineligible to play intercollegiate athletics because he received $110 in improper benefits (which he has since paid to charity), and because his university-assigned and trained tutor provided McAdoo with too much assistance in formatting his citations and ‘works cited’ page on his paper for one class in the summer of 2009. This punishment is grossly disproportionate to the facts of McAdoo’s case, and is inconsistent with the NCAA’s own guidelines and the punishments meted out by the NCAA in other cases with similar facts.”
McAdoo was ruled ineligible at the same time as fullback Devon Ramsay. Ramsay was able to win his appeal with the NCAA in February; McAdoo's was denied.

When McAdoo's appeal was denied, athletic director Dick Baddour called the decision "unfair." The argument around Chapel Hill is that sitting out all of 2010, in addition to punishment issued from the university, should suffice as proper punishment for his academic misconduct.

Whether McAdoo ever wants to play another down for the Tar Heels could be debated, but regaining his eligibility in the eyes of the NCAA is clearly a top priority. After a promising sophomore season, he entered 2010 ready to compete for a starting spot on the defensive line. If the 6-foot-7, 245 pound pass rusher is still in top shape, he could be a great addition to any program.

Seeking reinstatement from the NCAA could be his way to re-enter the competition for snaps in Chapel Hill or the first step in taking his talents elsewhere.
Posted on: June 22, 2011 6:55 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:56 pm
 

PODCAST: Talking UNC Notice of Allegations

Posted by Chip Patterson

Earlier today, I hopped on the CBSSports.com College Football Podcast with Adam Aizer and J. Darin Darst to talk a little UNC Notice of Allegations.

"Should Butch Davis be fired?" That's the question being asked by many people after scanning the collection of charges detailed in the 42-page report from the NCAA. In reality, there was very little in the notice that was not already known thanks to some aggressive reporting by both national and local media. But the report does bring together a year of investigations into potentially major violations in several different categories involving a fair share of the most notable names on the roster.

So yes, it does look bad. On the surface, it looks very bad.

But the picture that has been painted for the NCAA by North Carolina is one of an institution struggling to deal with "rogue" members. Since John Blake did not tell UNC about the money from Gary Wichard, and Jennifer Wiley continued to provide services after no longer being employed by the school; North Carolina (and more importantly Butch Davis) can say they are sorry and try to cooperate. In fact, it is their cooperation which the institution will argue demonstrates the feeling of responsibility among those in oversight of the program.

Many people would argue that Davis, who has known Blake for "at least 30 years," should have known his reputation around coaching circles. It will be argued for years to come, that no matter what the NCAA can or cannot prove: Davis knew what Blake and Wiley were doing.

But as of Tuesday, it does not appear that the NCAA is prepared to allege wrongdoing directly against Butch Davis. Enraged fans will scream that Davis is guilty, and demand what they consider "justice." But the NCAA, similar to our own justice system, does not act based on assumption or reputation. With no evidence, it cannot be proven that Davis knew of any wrongdoing during which he did not act on as a head coach.

As you'll hear in the podcast below, a decision was made when the NCAA set foot on campus. North Carolina either had to jump ship and get rid of Davis when the scandal broke, or ride out the storm with him at the helm. If Davis has made it this long, there will be no changes to his employment AT LEAST until this process is complete.

Okay, after all that serious talk I should probably warn you that we also discuss Mascots, Adam's plan for Wolvie the Wolverine, and my early crush on college cheerleaders.


Posted on: June 21, 2011 8:43 pm
 

UNC releases statements following NOA

Posted by Tom Fornelli

As Chip reported about here on the blog earlier on Tuesday night, North Carolina was hit with a Notice of Allegations from the NCAA. You can read all about it here, but following the notice the school released statements of its own.

From Chancellor Holden Thorp:

"I deeply regret that Carolina is in this position. We made mistakes, and we have to face that. When the investigation started a year ago, we pledged to cooperate fully with the NCAA, to go where the facts took us, and to face the issues head on. Our level of cooperation is evident in the allegations, some of which arise from facts that we self-reported to the NCAA. We will emerge with a stronger athletics program, and we will restore confidence in Carolina football."

Athletic Director Dick Baddour:

"We are disappointed to be in this position because it goes against everything we believe in, but we are thankful to get to the next step in the process. These are the issues that we have been dealing with since last summer. We will gather the information the NCAA has requested and prepare to address the notice with the NCAA in the fall. We have a strong staff that will help get us through this and put us in a position where we will be a better athletic department as a result. Our fans have been through a lot this past year, and we appreciate their continued patience and support as we work through these next steps with the NCAA."

Head coach Butch Davis:

"I feel terrible that these allegations occurred under my watch. I especially regret that the university has had to endure this scrutiny because of the football program. The responsibility for correcting any problems that put us in this position is mine, and I take that responsibility very seriously.

"I want to thank our fans for the tremendous support we have received. Their loyalty and support has been especially appreciated by our student-athletes. The opportunity I have to serve the University of North Carolina is one that I cherish, and I will continue to focus on improving every aspect of our football program."

North Carolina will appear before the Committee on Infractions in Indianapolis on October 28th. 

Posted on: June 21, 2011 8:13 pm
Edited on: July 22, 2011 4:57 pm
 

UNC receives Notice of Allegations from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

In June 2010 the NCAA began to investigate the North Carolina football program in regards to possible violations regarding players receiving impermissible benefits. After a tumultuous season that saw 14 players miss at least one game (with seven missing the entire season), the first steps of closure can begin with this multi-pronged investigation into the North Carolina football program.

The official Notice of Allegations (you can see the full letter here on TarHeelBlue.com), includes nine different allegations.

Three (3) of the allegations are against former North Carolina assistant coach John Blake:

- Unethical conduct for providing false and misleading information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution and for failure to cooperate with the investigation.
- Blake marketed athletic abilities of student-athletes to agent Gary Wichard
- Blake received outside income that he did not report to the institution

Two (2) of the allegations are against former North Carolina tutor Jennifer Wiley:

- Unethical conduct for refusing to provide information to the NCAA enforcement staff and to the institution
- Wiley provided extra benefits to student-athletes in the form of ravel and parking expenses, and tutoring.

The rest of the allegations: - Allegations of fraud against student-athletes and the tutor
- Allegations that student-athletes received preferential treatment and accepted impermissible benefits
- Allegations against a former student-athlete for unethical conduct
- Failure by the institution to adequately monitor the conduct of Chris Hawkins, an individual triggering NCAA agent legislation; the social media activity of the football team for a period in 2010; and possible extra benefits triggered by agent legislation.

The notice of allegations tells the school the alleged NCAA violations the enforcement staff found during the investigation process. The school has 90 days to respond, though they may request more time. After the school issues their response, a hearing date is set with the Committee on Infractions. The Committee on Infractions meets about six times a year, usually lasting for two to three days over a weekend. Most recently the committee heard cases related to Boise State and Tennessee. Ohio State, the grandaddy of NCAA cases these days, is currently scheduled to go before the committee on Aug. 12.

The NCAA requested that the school limit public comments on the details of the investigation and the Notice of Allegations until the hearing before the Committee on Infractions, which has been set for Oct. 28. However, head coach Butch Davis did offer a statement in the official release.

“I feel terrible that these allegations occurred under my watch," Davis said. "I especially regret that the university has had to endure this scrutiny because of the football program. The responsibility for correcting any problems that put us in this position is mine, and I take that responsibility very seriously."

Chancellor Holden Thorp also took responsibility for the allegations, but also credited the football program's cooperation with the NCAA during this year-long process.

“I deeply regret that Carolina is in this position," Thorp said. "We made mistakes, and we have to face that. When the investigation started a year ago, we pledged to cooperate fully with the NCAA, to go where the facts took us, and to face the issues head on. Our level of cooperation is evident in the allegations, some of which arise from facts that we self-reported to the NCAA. We will emerge with a stronger athletics program, and we will restore confidence in Carolina football.”

It is not until after the hearing the Committee on Infractions will put together their final report, which will include the penalties for the violations. Different forms of NCAA sanctions include reduced scholarships, postseason bans, vacated wins, recruiting restrictions, and television bans. In recent cases Michigan. USC, Florida State, Texas Tech, and Alabama have received some form of NCAA sanctions.

Posted on: June 7, 2011 4:59 pm
Edited on: June 7, 2011 5:01 pm
 

UNC receives Letter of Inquiry from NCAA

Posted by Chip Patterson

Last week, InsideCarolina.com reported that UNC was expecting to receive their Notice of Allegations from the NCAA sometime around the end of the this week. As we learned in the Ohio State case, the Notice of Allegations gives the school an idea of what charges they are facing for different violations. On Tuesday, UNC received their official Letter of Inquiry from the NCAA.

According to NCAA Enforcement Procedures, the Letter of Inquiry is sent to tell the university that the enforcement staff will be investigating the school. After the letter of inquiry is set, a notice of allegations must be sent within six months.

For the Tar Heels' football program, they did not need any notice to realize they are currently under investigation. This is merely the next official step in advancing the official process. The Notice of Allegations could come on Thursday or Friday, as InsideCarolina.com reported last week. Or the inquiry could be extended, and the notice may not be issued for 5-6 months from now. With the NCAA, you can never be sure on timetable - so we will sit and wait with the rest of the college football community as North Carolina waits to hear a definitive word on the eventual allegations.
 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com