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Tag:Eastern Washington
Posted on: September 12, 2011 4:06 pm
Edited on: September 12, 2011 4:23 pm
 

The Poll Attacks: Week 2

Posted by Bryan Fischer

The latest college football polls are out and now it's time to rip them to shreds. Senior college basketball writer Gary Parrish has been calling out voters in the major hoops polls for thinking a little bit too far outside of the box when it comes to their AP ballots every week.

With the football season starting, I thought I'd steal take the baton on the idea from my colleague and keep all of the writers across the country who vote honest. I've come to know a good number of these people through time and twitter but relationships do not matter, bad votes do.

AP Poll           Coaches Poll

(Details of AP ballots courtesy of PollSpeak.com)

Poll reactions: ACC, Big East, Big Ten, Big 12, Pac-12, SEC

Rodney Dangerfield "No respect" team of the week: Baylor

Really coaches? Again? I threw your sports information directors under the bus last week for having Baylor behind a TCU team they beat. Imagine my surprise to see this for the second consecutive week. I know you all believe in Gary Patterson. I do too. But they settled it on the field and he lost. Robert Griffin III will give your defensive coordinator the willies. The only thing I can think of is you're not big fans of schools that threaten others with lawsuits.

Overrated: Nebraska

Both polls have the Cornhuskers sitting in the top 10, behind 9th-ranked Texas A&M and ahead of 11th-ranked South Carolina. Perhaps it's our place to point out that the Taylor Martinez completed just 50% of his passes against Chattanooga in the opener. Or that it was a one point game entering the 4th quarter against Fresno State. But go ahead and rank them fifth Ira Schoffel. Sixth isn't much better Tom Murphy. Things won't get much better if they beat Washington either I'm guessing but at least we'll have a better idea of how good this team is.

California Craziness

A trio of voters from California (CSN Bay Area/CBSSports.com's Ray Ratto, San Jose Mercury News' Jon Wilner, LA Daily News' Scott Wolf) are an interesting voting block. Some would call them progressive, others would call them extreme and just about everybody else will call them crazy given their fluctuations in their ballots each week. All three are consistently in Pollspeak's group of "extreme voters" so we'll highlight the most baffling decision(s) out of each.

Wilner was in this space last week but even though his ballot was utterly ridiculous again (Texas 14th? Almost as bad as Virginia Tech 23rd or Arkansas 25th), we'll move on to Mr. Ratto. I know he watches a lot of Pac-12 games out in San Francisco so why, then, do you have Oregon 23rd and Washington 14th? Are the Huskies' narrow victories over FCS Eastern Washington and Hawaii make them deserving of being ranked ahead of Baylor? Is losing to your number one ranked team - LSU - the reason for the Ducks being behind Texas? Or 12 spots behind USF? Did you see the Trojans eek out a victory for the second straight week? You certainly were not watching Arizona State beat Missouri. And I'm positive you didn't read Brett McMurphy's column saying Arkansas is talented enough to win the SEC because you fail to include the Razorbacks on your ballot. Craziness indeed.

What were you thinking? USF

Mike Hlas of the Cedar Rapids Gazette was in this spot last week for ranking USF fifth despite Notre Dame doubling their yardage and winning by three. So guess what? USF sits fifth once again. They're in the Big East. They beat an 0-2 Irish team by three. They might be good at the end of the year but in no way are they the fifth best team in the country. Wisconsin, Stanford, Florida State and all of the other teams you have behind them are better and it's not even close. I'm sorry, over-rating Notre Dame and then over-rating a team that beat them should get you kicked off the voting roster.

Come on man

Last week, I put my colleague over at SI.com, Andy Staples, in this space for ranking Boise State way too low at No. 13 in his ballot following their win against Georgia. Andy owned up to his mistake and apologized to Bronco Nation (and thus, me) for having them too far down. His week three ballot has the Blue turfers seventh between Florida State and Texas A&M. While Staples' polling has come around, he also gave me some good advice: I'm too nice.

Well, sorry Chadd Cripe of the Idaho Statesman. You're now in the crosshairs thinks to Staples' advice.

I know you're a bit isolated up in Idaho but there has to be television with satellite somewhere in the state, right? You have Florida State as a borderline top 15 team (#13), UCF in the top 20 (highest out of anyone) along with Mississippi State two spots ahead of them. Oregon's still in the top 10 at No. seven and both Auburn and Ohio State are top 20 teams despite each narrowly escaping competition that usually plays on Thursday's.

Hlas' ballot is so terrible he gets an additional mention in this spot. USF, fifth. Seriously?

Also, the AP itself gets a mention for their mistake this week, which you can read more about here.


Posted on: May 4, 2011 4:47 pm
 

Huskies name Price starting quarterback

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Steve Sarkisian and the Washington Huskies aren't waiting around to make their choice on Jake Locker's replacement.

That choice: sophomore Keith Price, who beat out redshirt freshman Nick Montana in spring camp for the starting quarterback job according to the team's newly released depth chart. Sarkisian:
"Based on his entire body of work this spring, Keith Price has earned the right to be our starting quarterback. Keith worked extremely hard this spring and has developed into a team leader. I am also pleased with the progress of Nick Montana, who will continue to push Keith and make us a better football team."
Though the timing of the announcement is maybe unexpected -- Sarkisian added that the quarterback competition would extend into the fall, even if it would take a huge pratfall by Price, it seems, for him to lose the job -- that Price emerged as the winner isn't. Price won the backup job to Locker last year and performed well enough for a freshman, completing better than half his 37 passes and throwing a pair of touchdowns vs. no interceptions.

Price's spring game performance likely only further cemented his hold on the job, as he went 20-for-28 for 212 yards and three scores. Montana wasn't bad -- 9 of 20, 146 yards, two touchdowns -- but likely needed Price to be worse.

No doubt Montana will, as Sarkisian said, continue to push for playing time. But with plenty of other questions still to answer before their 2011 season opens against reigning FCS champions Eastern Washington -- make note of all the "OR"'s in the Huskie depth chart, and that quarterback isn't one of them -- the Huskies will be more than glad to have one this big behin them.

Posted on: April 12, 2011 10:52 am
 

FCS scheduling still on the rise

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

It won't surprise anyone to learn that paycheck games pitting BCS conference teams against FCS patsies -- or non-patsies, as the occasional James Madison/Appalachian State case may be -- are becoming more and more frequent.

But it might surprise some just how rapidly they're increasing, particularly in the domain of the formerly FCS-light Pac-12. Research by the Oregonian shows that such games have increased by a factor of nearly six out West:
Games between FBS and FCS teams have spiked 70 percent since a 2005 NCAA rule change made the games more attractive, according to analysis by The Oregonian. The matchups have increased nearly 600 percent in the Pacific-10 Conference and 358 percent in the Big Ten, even adjusting for conference expansion.
Look at that again: 600 percent. Why? You get one guess:
Athletic director Rob Mullens of Oregon, which plays FCS team Missouri State next fall, said he schedules the games for two main reasons: to have an extra home game and to combat skyrocketing prices for FBS nonconference teams making onetime visits.

"They'll want $900,000 or a million," Mullens said. "And we pay in the $400,000 range for an FCS opponent. That's a big difference."
Thanks to that economic reality (and, more immediately, Washington scheduling defending FCS champion Eastern Washington), only three FBS teams have still never stooped to an FCS game: Notre Dame, USC, and UCLA.

Kudos to them. But with the exception of schools that have doubled up on their FCS snacky-cakes ration, it's tough to be too harsh on the rest of FBS; when Eastern Washington costs substantially less than Eastern Michigan and your fans can't tell the difference, it doesn't make any sense to schedule the latter. Until the NCAA adds some kind of disincentive for scheduling the first FCS game as well as the second (which doesn't count towards bowl eligibility), don't expect the trend line to head in the other direction any time soon.
Posted on: January 10, 2011 3:48 am
 

Bowl Grades: Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Nevada shut down an anemic Boston College offense en route to a 20-13 win.

Nevada

Offense: Rishard Matthews had two first-quarter scores, but the Nevada offense was uncharacteristically subdued today, largely due to three turnovers -- two interceptions and a lost fumble. Still, Nevada had to punt seven times (Nevada typically punts fewer than three times a game), and scored less than half its usual amount of points. Vai Taua was held in check, with 76 yards on 22 carries, and Colin Kaepernick had a positively pedestrian performance in this, his last game as a Wolf. 20-33 for under 200 yards and only one score usually won't cut it; Nevada was fortunate to be facing Boston College. Grade: C-

Defense: Nevada typically isn't thought of as a defensive powerhouse, but it's actually not that bad. From a total yardage standpoint, Nevada's pretty middle of the road, but the Wolf Pack only gives up about 22 points a game -- second only to Boise State in the pinball-scoreboard WAC. Tonight, Nevada was all over Boston College's rushing attack, giving up 30 yards on one rush and 34 yards on the other 24 rushes combined. The Wolf Pack secondary forced two interceptions from Chase Rettig and could have had three or four more; Rettig's passes were frequently deflected or otherwise found a defender's hands. Boston College had one drive of over 30 yards all day long. That's more than you can ask from a defense -- dropped interceptions aside. Grade: A-

Coaching: It's not exactly an indictment of Chris Ault if his players weren't amped up for today's game. BC was 7-5 in a very unimpressive ACC this season, and didn't look like a worthy opponent for the champion of a conference that boasted 10-win teams Nevada, Boise State, and Hawaii among its members.  Moreover, the Kraft Fight Hunger Bowl came 36 days after Nevada's last game, so there's always going to be some rust with that long of a layoff -- as was evident during this game. But Nevada looked pretty well-prepared, and Ault's play calls were fine. They were conservative, sure, but conservative wins games when leading against an inferior opponent. Really, this game wasn't nearly as close as the seven-point margin would indicate; only the turnovers kept the game "in doubt," and last we checked, Ault wasn't the one giving the ball up. Play calling is more than "you should throw a touchdown here and not an interception," after all. Grade: B

Boston College

Offense: Chase Rettig tries hard, and he tried hard for all four quarters today. Now, whenever it's necessary to mention that a player "plays hard," it's a safe assumption he just had a terrible game, and that's what happened here. Rettig's final stats were 14-34 for 121 yards and two interceptions, good for a 59.3 passer rating. Worse yet, he spent most of the game with a lower rating, and it wasn't until the fourth quarter that he stayed above three yards per pass attempt. And again, it could have been worse; Nevada should have had somewhere between three and five interceptions on the day. It didn't help that Andre Williams contributed a 30-yard rushing score and basically little else, of course, nor that the Eagle offense was painfully predictable (oh, we're getting to that). Still, this was a painfully bad offensive performance, to the point that head coach Frank Spaziani himself called it "anemic" during his halftime interview, and considering what gifts Nevada gave BC with its turnovers (an interception returned to the Nevada 6-yard line resulted in a field goal, for crying out loud), the Eagles really had no business scoring only 13 points. Grade: F

Defense: Aside from Boise State, Boston College might have the best front seven Nevada faced all year, and it was immediately evident. Nevada rushed for 114 yards, including 76 for Taua and 22 for Kaepernick. If it hadn't been for a 51-yard performance by Taua against Eastern Washington in a warmup at the beginning of the year, all three of those numbers would be season lows. All-American LB Luke Kuechly had an interception and a boatload of tackles for the Eagles, and BC frequently and reliably moved the point of attack backwards on defense when Nevada tried rushing the ball. The secondary struggled at times, though, especially on throws to the sideline. Grade: B

Coaching: Eagles fans were understandably upset with their team's play-calling, and rightfully so; it's infuriating to watch a straight-laced, run-run-third-and-long offense when the other team has a quarterback like Kaepernick and a fun system like Ault's pistol offense. The fact is, though, that Spaziani really doesn't have much talent on offense (especially with dynamic starting tailback Montel Harris still out with injury), and his defensive planning and second-half adjustments were praise-worthy. Boston College needs players on offense, plain and simple. Grade: C-

Final Grade

This practice of scheduling minor bowl games for January dates -- historically the province of only high-profile bowls -- could end today, and no college football fan would be upset. This bowl game was laughably bad, particularly when Boston College was on offense, and the fact that it comes on the eve of the national championship seems like cruel and unusual punishment. During the game, when the Kraft commercial featuring the dulcet-toned former homeless man Ted Williams finally aired, the prevailing sentiment on Twitter was that it was the unquestioned highlight of the game. It was that bad. At the very least, Boston College's defense helped get the game back to a one-possession contest, but this was the most lopsided seven-point game in recent memory. Thankfully, it's over, and real January football can be played. Grade: D- and only because it was close


Posted on: January 10, 2011 3:44 am
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