Tag:Ed Wesley
Posted on: December 21, 2011 11:35 pm
Edited on: December 21, 2011 11:35 pm
 

QUICK HITS: TCU 31, Louisiana Tech 24

Posted by Bryan Fischer

SAN DIEGO -- Let's face it, after two straight BCS bowls TCU wasn't exactly thrilled about ending the season well before Christmas at the Poinsettia Bowl. No matter what head coach Gary Patterson said or would have you believe, the Horned Frogs came out of the tunnel at Snapdragon Stadium uninspired and the play on the field clearly reflected as much. Penalties. Yards allowed like the opposing quarterback was named Robert Griffin III. Illegal formations. Muffed Punts. Turnovers. It wasn't the prettiest effort but considering the Horned Frogs only play in close bowl games - six of their last seven by a touchdown or less - they did just enough late to pull out a win against WAC champion Louisiana Tech

TCU WON. The bowl was just one of four games this postseason to match up conference champions, with the Horned Frogs winning the Mountain West in their final season in the league. They had their hands full with the WAC champs largely due to their own mistakes that gave the Bulldogs extra chances before taking control on both sides of the ball in the 4th quarter. Louisiana Tech's defense played extremely well and the offense was solid but TCU just found a way to win.

HOW TCU WON: It was not a game won by TCU's trademark defense, which struggled all night with LaTech's aerial attack. The secondary had trouble against option routes and anything down the field. They played man-to-man a good portion of the night and were torched for a long Myles White touchdown that gave the Bulldogs the lead in the second half. The offense was fairly effective, with running backs Ed Wesley and Matthew Tucker getting up field for some nice gains and quarterback Casey Pachall did a good job on throwing intermediate routes. Special teams were not very good at all, with Brandon Carter muffing a punt that set up a later touchdown. Still, the offense got more creative in the final quarter and that was the difference in the game.

WHEN TCU WON: After Louisiana Tech quickly took the lead late in the 3rd quarter, TCU put together an impressive 18-play, 72-yard drive to tie the game - the team's longest scoring drive of the season in terms of time off the clock and number of plays. Thanks to good pressure by the front seven, the Horned Frogs forced a three-and-out then Pachall found Skye Dawson on a 42-yard touchdown pass after rolling out on third down to take a 31-24 lead to seal the win.

WHAT TCU WON: The win gave Patterson his seventh bowl victory and as head coach of the Horned Frogs and 109th overall, tying him with Dutch Meyer as TCU's all-time winningest coach. It also gives the program their 11th win of the season and sends them off to the Big 12 with an eight game winning streak.

WHAT LOUISIANA TECH LOST: It was a great second year for head coach Sonny Dykes, turning things around after an early funk by running off seven straight wins en route to the WAC title. Any coach will say there's no such thing as a moral victory but the Bulldogs competed in every single game this season and showed they were close to a top 15 program in TCU. There's plenty to like about the effort they gave Wednesday night, even if they ultimately have to go into the offseason with an "L" in their last game.

THAT WAS CRAZY: Despite it being his first year as a full-time starter, TCU quarterback Casey Pachall set new school records for completions and yardage this season, passing Andy Dalton. Nothing will help the young team transition to Big 12 play like having an experienced signal-caller like Pachall.

FINAL GRADE: B-. There was a lot of sloppy play on both sides and plenty of missed opportunities. Given that it matched up two conference champions, one expected a close game but this was close because neither team could take advantage and deliver a knock out blow until TCU did late. It wasn't a terrible game but it wasn't a great one either. 


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Posted on: December 15, 2011 3:53 pm
Edited on: December 20, 2011 9:17 pm
 

Poinsettia Bowl Key Match up



Posted by Bryan Fischer


A look at the key matchup that could decide the Poinsettia Bowl

Ryan Allen/Louisiana Tech pass defense vs. Casey Pachall

Go through the logs of head coaches pre- or post-game press conference and you're bound to find at least one emphasis on winning the field position battle. It's no surprise that would be a focus in this bowl match up, which features some pretty good offenses and defenses that don't mind some help.

Allen is a huge weapon for Louisiana Tech, winning the Ray Guy Award as the country's best punter thanks to 36 punts inside the 20 during the regular season. He can also kick for distance, averaging an impressive 46.31 yards per punt. Being able to pin the TCU offense back will be a huge help for a defense that is ranked 55th in the country and has had issues with spread attacks featuring speedy skill position players.

"When you have a punter like they do, he can change the ball game," Gary Patterson said. "When you get a 60 or 70-yard punt, all of the sudden, field position changes."

Pachall has filled Andy Dalton's shoes pretty well in his first year as a starter. He's seventh in the country in passing efficiency, throwing for 24 touchdowns against just six picks. The Horned Frogs offense is among the most balanced in the country and it certainly helps to able to turn around and hand the ball off to Matthew Tucker, Ed Wesley and Waymon James. But Pachall does have some young receivers that can get down the field if he's allowed time to throw.

"They’ve got three outstanding running backs, they’ve got a big, physical offensive line, they’ve got speed at the wide receiver position, they’ve got a quarterback who has not missed a beat, who has improved steadily throughout the course of the season," Bulldogs head coach Sonny Dykes said. "It’s a great offensive football team. They can pound you, they can ‘big play’ you."

If Louisiana Tech plays sound on defense and doesn't bite on the play-action passes, they should be able to slow Pachall and the TCU offense down some. Having Allen pin them back would be big in winning the field position battle and giving the Bulldogs offense a short field. Force some turnovers and this turns into a winnable game for LaTech despite being decided underdogs to a 10-win team in TCU.

"Our guys have got some grit about them," said Dykes. "We’re going to have to play extremely well to compete against TCU. They are a
team that knows how to win."

You can read our complete Poinsettia Bowl preview here.

Posted on: November 8, 2011 12:42 pm
 

Keys to the Game: Boise State vs. TCU

Posted by Tom Fornelli

BOISE STATE WILL WIN IF: Kellen Moore continues to be Kellen Moore. That's not to say that this game is an easy win for Boise State, because it's not. This will easily be the toughest test that the Broncos have faced since opening the season against Georgia in Atlanta. It's also incredibly important in the Mountain West standings as both of these teams are unbeaten in conference play and the winner will likely win the conference. In order for that to happen for Boise State, Kellen Moore and the offense will have to look at what Baylor and SMU did earlier this season to defeat TCU. This Horned Frogs defense has been good this season, but it's not as good as the unit we've seen the last few years, particularly in the secondary. While it isn't giving up a lot of yards through the air, the fact is that the TCU defense has allowed 18 passing touchdowns this season with only 7 interceptions. With Kellen Moore's accuracy and career ratio of 5.33 touchdowns for every interception thrown, this is something that the Broncos can and should take advantage of.

TCU WILL WIN IF: It can figure out how to stop Kellen Moore and this offense. Which not many teams have been able to do in the past four years. The key to doing this will be to get pressure in Moore's face and try to force him into making throws he either doesn't want to or shouldn't make. Of course, even if you can get some pressure on Moore, Boise's offense is still going to find ways to score, which means TCU will have to play well on offense. The Horned Frogs don't have a strong passing attack this season, but if there's good news it's that you're probably better off running against Boise anyway. The Broncos only allow 140.4 yards per game on the ground, but they also have the lowest amount of rushing attempts per game in the Mountain West. The number that TCU should pay attention to is the fact that Boise is allowing over 4 yards per carry. So a healthy dose of Waymon James, Ed Wesley and Matthew Tucker could go a long way.

X-FACTOR: Bronco Stadium. You may remember that this game was originally supposed to be played in Fort Worth, but then suddenly after TCU announced it would be leaving the Mountain West for the Big East -- which became the Big 12 -- the game was moved to Boise. A factor that can't be overlooked in this contest considering that Boise State hasn't lost a regular season game on the blue turf of Bronco Stadium in a decade.
Posted on: March 7, 2011 12:26 pm
 

Spring Practice Primer: TCU

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

College Football has no offseason. Every coach knows that the preparation for September begins now, in Spring Practice . So we here at the Eye on College Football  will get you ready as teams open spring ball with our Spring Practice Primers . Today, we look at TCU , who began practice over the weekend.

Spring Practice Question: Do the Horned Frogs have the offensive firepower to slam the door in the Mountain West's face on their way out?

Remember how when NBA legends like Julius Erving would announce their retirement, their final season would be a long series of tearful goodbyes as the legend-in-question would be showered at each road venue with gifts and well-wishes? And you know how this is TCU's final season in the Mountain West, the conference it's won three times and helped shape into a national power on the cusp of an automatic BCS bid? Yeah, that season is going to be the complete opposite of that NBA thing.

Because the Mountain West has done all it can to skip the bouquets and send the Horned Frogs off to the Big East with a giant kick in the pants. Not only did the league unilaterally force TCU to forgo their biggest home game of the year in exchange for a brutal road game at Boise State, they ignored the Frogs' choice for a bye week in favor of giving them weeks off before New Mexico and UNLV ... two miserable teams the Frogs could have swept in a doubleheader the week after going to Boise if they had to. It's safe to say there's nothing the MWC wants more than to see TCU flail their way out of a league that spent the year proving it didn't need them; it's equally safe to say there's nothing Gary Patterson would like more than to say good-bye with the raised middle finger of a third straight conference championship.

But entering spring practice, the odds look much longer than they did in either 2009 or 2010. While part of that is the enhanced schedule -- even the Frogs' undefeated showdowns with Utah the past two seasons won't present nearly the challenge of taking on the Broncos on the blue turf -- the much larger part is facing down that schedule with so much lost on offense. Eight starters are gone from the unit that helped bring home a Rose Bowl title, a group headlined by four-year quarterback starter and career 10,000-yard passer Andy Dalton.

But the losses go much deeper than that. The Frogs' second-, third- and fourth-leading receivers are all departed, including top go-to possession wideout Jeremy Kerley and the reliable Jimmy Young. Bookend 6'6" tackles Marcus Cannon and Zach Roth have both graduated. In the interior of the line, the Frogs must replace 300-pound guard Josh Vernon and 308-pound All-American center Jake Kirkpatrick, only the 2010 Rimington Trophy winner.

The good news for TCU is that particularly at the skill positions, they seem positioned to weather the storm. Quarterbacking heir-to-the-throne Casey Pachall was one of Patterson's most highly-regarded recruits, has drawn rave reviews in practice, and should be more than ready as a redshirt sophomore. The tailback tag-team of juniors Ed Wesley and Matthew Tucker -- who combined for 1,787 yards and 18 rushing touchdowns in 2010 -- returns intact. Top receiver Josh Boyce is back after a breakout redshirt freshman season that saw him average an eye-popping 19 yards per reception.

But there's only so much all that skill-position talent can do if the four new starters up front aren't up to the task. Spring camp should give Patterson and the TCU fans an excellent chance to gauge their progress across from one of the perennially best-coached defensive fronts in the country (not to mention Tank Carder). If the line shows potential, Pachall lives up to the hype, and some member of the Frog receiving corps steps up to provide some measure of balance across from Boyce, it won't be too early to start dreaming about yet another BCS season.

But if not? Boise's going to start licking their chops (to say nothing of teams like BYU, San Diego State, Baylor, etc.), and the MWC bigwigs can start their dreaming about having the last laugh.


Posted on: November 9, 2010 2:25 pm
 

Maxwell semifinalists released; where are RBs?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

There has been one good piece of news to come out over the past 24 hours for Cam Newton : the Maxwell Football Club named him one of 16 semifinalists for the Maxwell Award , the organization's honor for the best player in college football. And though Newton has accumulated the stats and highlight reels of an All-American running back this season, it's perhaps for the best for him he doesn't actually play the position. That's the way it looks from the complete list of semifinalists:

WR Justin Blackmon , Oklahoma State, So.
WR Ryan Broyles, Oklahoma, Jr.
QB Andy Dalton , TCU, Sr.
QB Robert Griffin III , Baylor, So.
RB Kendall Hunter , Oklahoma State, Sr.
RB LaMichael James , Oregon, So.
QB Colin Kaepernick , Nevada, Sr.
QB Andrew Luck , Stanford, So.
QB Ryan Mallett , Arkansas, Jr.
QB Taylor Martinez , Nebraska, Fr.
QB Kellen Moore , Boise State, Jr.
QB Cam Newton , Auburn, Jr.
QB Terrelle Pryor , Ohio State, Jr.
QB Denard Robinson , Michigan, So.
QB Ricky Stanzi , Iowa, Sr.
QB Tyrod Taylor , Virginia Tech, Sr.

All right, so it's also a little odd that none of the top 16 players in the nation by the Maxwell's estimation happen to play defense. But it's nothing unusual for defenders to get snubbed in the national Player of the Year talk, and since the Maxwell Club also hands out the Bednarik Award to the nation's best defensive player, the Maxwell itself appears to be a de facto offensive players-only honor; even the great Ndamokung Suh didn't crack the semifinalists list last season .

So the much bigger surprise is that among a list of the nation's top 16 offensive players, only two running backs, Hunter and James, make the cut next to two wide receivers and a whopping 12 quarterbacks. Since when has the the second-most high-profile position on the football field been this devoid of stars?

Since 2010, apparently. Last year's Maxwell semifinalist list included seven tailbacks, including a pair of Heisman finalists in Toby Gerhart and Mark Ingram and several who returned to college football for this 2010 season: Ingram, Noel Devine , Jacquizz Rodgers , Dion Lewis . Unfortunately for those four players, the season hasn't played out as expected for any of them; not one currently ranks among even the top 30 rushers in the nation at present, with Rodgers' 803 yards (good for 33rd) the best year to-date of the bunch.

Why the sudden downturn in the fortunes of the nation's top tailbacks? Some of it is probably a simple fluke. But some of it is the continuing rise of the spread offense, which revolves around the all-purpose quarterback at the expense of pounding along with the traditional bruising tailback. Auburn , Nevada , Michigan , TCU , Baylor -- these are all some of the most explosive offenses in the country, and all five begin with a mobile QB. It's no wonder all five placed their quarterbacks on the list above despite the presence of top rushers like Nevada's Vai Taua , Baylor's Jay Finley , and TCU's Ed Wesley . This year's top pro-style attacks, meanwhile, are all quarterback-dominated as well: Stanford and Luck, Arkansas and Mallett, Boise and Moore. Offenses like the 2009 Cardinal and Tide attacks that turned Gerhart and Ingram into superstars just aren't out there this year.

They'll probably be back next year. But that doesn't mean they'll be back in the same numbers we've seen in the past; as long as the spread remains as in vogue as it is today, the kind of bludgeoning workhorse tailback that makes award lists is going to stay an increasingly endangered species.
Posted on: October 21, 2010 12:00 pm
 

Gary Patterson will yell your concussion away

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Last month during a win over SMU, TCU head coach Gary Patterson was caught on camera yelling at a trainer on the sidelines.  Turns out that Patterson wasn't very fond of the trainer's decision to hold running back Ed Wesley out of the game with what he diagnosed as a concussion.  Well that trainer was the team's head physician, and during an interview with American Medical News , he gave us a better idea of what went down on that sideline.

"He was knocked unconscious, and any loss of consciousness is automatically considered a concussion," said Dr. Samuel J. Haraldson. "He had an unsteady gait and a few memory problems.

"Then five or six plays later, I literally was verbally accosted by the coach, screaming at me insanely at the top of his lungs that he doesn't think [Wesley] has a concussion and what right do I have to hold him out,"

Haraldson says that after TCU had taken control of the game, Patterson did come over and offer what he termed a "pseudo-apology."  Of course, a few days later Patterson told ESPN Dallas that as far as he was concerned, Wesley "was fine ten minutes after he got hurt."

It's a problem that isn't just taking place at TCU, either.  Coaches throughout the country are under more pressure to win football games than ever before, and treating concussions so carefully is a new thing in football because we're only know becoming aware of what kind of damage they can do.  Just look at Arkansas, where even though Ryan Mallett suffered a concussion last week against Auburn, he's back practicing and is likely going to play again this Saturday.

That's a decision based on winning football games, not Mallett's personal well-being.

These are supposed to be student -athletes, after all, who aren't being paid to play at the school.  Instead they're being rewarded with a free education, which doesn't mean much if you can't remember anything you learned because your coach is rushing you back onto the field following a concussion.
Hat tip: Doc Saturday
 
 
 
 
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