Tag:Greg Childs
Posted on: September 24, 2011 7:02 pm
Edited on: September 24, 2011 7:43 pm
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QUICK HITS: No. 3 Alabama 38, No. 14 Arkansas 14

Posted by Jerry Hinnen



ALABAMA WON: If there were any last lingering doubts about the Crimson Tide's national championship bona fides, they were erased in Tuscaloosa today. Alabama dominated the visiting Razorbacks in all three phases, getting 211 yards from scrimmage from Trent Richardson (on 10.6 yards a touch), scoring two touchdowns on special teams, and holding the previously red hot Hog offense to a miserable 3.96 yards per-play, 226 total. Given the kind of team Arkansas should prove to be this season, this goes down as the most impressive performance of the 2011 college football season to-date. LSU: your move.

WHY ALABAMA WON: We're man enough to admit when we're wrong, and when we wrote yesterday that the Tide secondary could be beaten deep? Judging by Saturday's evidence, we were very, very wrong. Tyler Wilson completed 22 of his 35 passes before giving way to Brandon Mitchell in the fourth quarter, but for only 185 yards--5.3 an attempt. Again and again Wilson was forced to check down to slithery receivers like Joe Adams or Jarius Wright, and again and again Mark Barron, Dre Kirkpatrick and the rest of the Tide secondary was there to smother them well short of the sticks. The Hogs' inability to get deep was encapsulated by a 3rd-and-1 play in the fourth quarter, when Wilson executed an excellent play-action fake, looked deep towards Greg Childs and fired ... only for Childs to be blanketed in double-coverage by Barron and Kirkpatrick, who only missed out on an interception by colliding with each other.

Combine Arkansas's lack of any kind of downfield threat with their near-total feebleness in the run game (19 yards, .9 per-carry), and it's no surprise they enjoyed just one gain (one) longer than 20 yards. The Hogs were forced to drive the field on the Tide, and we have serious doubts anyone can drive the field on the Tide.

WHEN ALABAMA WON: A comeback from 31-7 down in the third quarter was never likely, but the Hogs could at least dream after getting a highlight-reel touchdown pass from Wilson to Cobi Hamilton and following it up with a stop and drive across midfield. But the aforementioned play-action failure on 3rd-and-1 led to a Dennis Johnson run up the middle on 4th-and-1 ... which Dont'a Hightower mercilessly stuffed. With just 3:30 left in the quarter, that stuff ended whatever remaining threat Arkansas represented.

WHAT ALABAMA WON: The right to be called the best team in the country ... pending what Oklahoma and LSU do later Saturday night. The battle for No. 1 is officially a three-horse race.

WHAT ARKANSAS LOST: Any right to be mentioned in the same breath with the Tide and Tigers at the top of the SEC. The Hogs are banged-up on defense and were a poor matchup for the Tide on offense, but their lines simply aren't physical enough or powerful enough to battle the current consensus top two.

THAT WAS CRAZY: You didn't think we'd wrap this post up without mentioning Marquis Maze's spectacular third-quarter punt return for touchdown, do you? Adams was supposed to be the big special teams threat this game, but Maze's weaving Play of the Year candidate had more than a little to say about that:


Posted on: August 8, 2011 9:48 pm
Edited on: August 9, 2011 1:27 pm
 

CBSSports.com Preseason All-SEC team

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

As part of CBSSports.com's season preview, we offer one blogger's choices for preseason All-SEC.
Our team includes 11 players on either side of the ball, because any more is cheating.

Offense

QUARTERBACK

Aaron Murray, rSoph., Georgia.
A 24-to-8 touchdown-to-interception ratio would be damn good for any quarterback. For a redshirt freshman in his first year on the job playing without the benefit of a strong running game, it was downright outstanding. (And, in fact, made him the most efficient underclassman quarterback in the country.) Murray should emerge as the conference's clearcut best passer as a sophomore.

Also watch for: Mississippi State's Chris Relf, the conference's best rushing quarterback and option operator; Arkansas's Tyler Wilson, like all Bobby Petrino pupils a 300-yard day waiting to happen; and South Carolina's Stephen Garcia, Murray's biggest competition for first-team honors if he can eliminate the backbreaking turnovers that have plagued his career.

RUNNING BACK

Trent Richardson, Jr., Alabama.
Boasting arguably the nation's best combination of power and speed at the position, Richardson should find himself carrying the lion's share of the load for a Tide offense that's never shied away from pounding out wins on the ground--and will shy away even less in 2011 with an unsettled passing game and ruthless defense.

Marcus Lattimore, Soph., South Carolina. The league's near-unquestioned leader in yards-after-contact, Lattimore's ruggedness and stamina sometimes overshadowed his other stunning gifts: his Mark Ingram-esque balance, surprising acceleration, and maybe the best pair of hands for a back in the SEC. Maybe the nation's best all-around back.

Also watch for: pretty much everyone, given even the SEC's least-heralded backs (like, say, Tennessee's overlooked Tauren Poole) have the potential for a 1,200- to 1,300-yard season. But we'll spotlight Arkansas workhorse Knile Davis, a good bet to finish as the league's top rusher despite the Heisman candidates above.

WIDE RECEIVER

Alshon Jeffery, Jr., South Carolina.
The league's leading receiver in 2010 by nearly 400 yards, there are sea urchins that could tell you Jeffery belongs here. A consensus preseason All-American and first-round lock, don't be surprised if he walks away with this year's Biletnikoff Award.

Greg Childs, Sr., Arkansas.
We're five selections in now and have yet to break ranks with preseason consensus, but we're not going to in this slot, either; at an NFL-ready 6'3", 215, Childs was step-for-statistical-step with Jeffery last season before an injury cut things short. Expect him to make up for lost time in 2011.

Also watch for: Childs' Razorback teammates Joe Adams and Jarius Wright, either of which could top 1,000 yards themselves; Tennessee sophomore home-run threat Justin Hunter; and junior Emory Blake, who could see a massive statistical bump as the No. 1 receiver in Auburn's more aerial-friendly offense.

OFFENSIVE LINE

C William Vlachos, Sr., Alabama.
The senior leader of what shapes up as the conference's best offensive line, Vlachos will have a shot at the Rimington Trophy.

OT Barrett Jones, Jr., Alabama.
After two years at guard, the All-SEC performer and All-American candidate moves to tackle for 2011.

OT Bobby Massie, Jr., Ole Miss.
Senior teammate Bradley Sowell could fit in this slot, but we like the immensely talented 6'6", 315-pound mauler to take another big step forward, especially in the run game.

OG Alvin Bailey, rSoph., Arkansas. Speaking of steps forward, Bailey started all 13 games in 2010, earned freshman All-American honors, and should be the focal point of an improved Hog ground game.

OG Larry Warford, Sr., Kentucky. The future pro was named second-team All-SEC a year ago and preseason All-SEC this year by both the media and coaches--not an easy thing to do at Kentucky.

Also watch for: Sowell, for one. But every SEC team has at least one player or two with all-conference potential. Perhaps the most likely candidates not listed above are at Georgia, where center Ben Jones and tackle Cordy Glenn could put an end to the Bulldogs' years of line underachievement in their senior seasons.

TIGHT END

Orson Charles, Jr. Georgia.
No other returning tight end in the league was close to his 26 receptions for 422 yards last year--and with A.J. Green and Kris Durham gone, Charles's role in the Bulldog offense should only expand from here.

Also watch for: Auburn's Phillip Lutzenkirchen, also due to see a numbers spike thanks to other receivers' departures. And if Florida jack-of-all-trades Jordan Reed sticks to TE, expect an impact from him as well.

Defense

DEFENSIVE LINE

DE Jake Bequette, Sr. Arkansas. In collecting seven sacks a year ago, Bequette emerged as the most explosive performer in the Hogs' highly-underrated front seven.

DE Devin Taylor, Jr., South Carolina. The Gamecocks finished a quiet third in the SEC last season in rush defense, due in large part to Taylor's 13 tackles-for-loss (tops among returning linemen) and 7.5 sacks.

DT Malik Jackson, Sr., Tennessee. It won't be easy for the talkative Jackson this season--he's the Vols' only returning starter in the front seven, and he's already missing two weeks of practice with a knee injury--but no returning SEC tackle was as disruptive in 2010.

DT Sharrif Floyd, Soph., Florida. Part of Urban Meyer's famous five-star haul in February 2010, Floyd collected 6.5 tackles-for-loss despite only starting two games and has reportedly been unblockable in recent Gator practices.

Also watch for: the nose tackles in either Alabama's or Georgia's 3-4 schemes--Josh Chapman in Tuscaloosa, and Kwame Geathers or Johnathan Jenkins in Athens. Ole Miss end Kentrell Lockett is in his sixth year and could lead the league in sacks if healthy. And the early reports are that megarecruits Jadeveon Clowney (at Carolina) and Anthony Johnson (at LSU) are as good as advertised.

LINEBACKERS

OLB Courtney Upshaw, Sr. Alabama.
Seven sacks and 14.5 tackles-for-loss a year ago, and those numbers should only improve as Nick Saban makes him the cornerstone of a more-dedicated Tide pass rush.

ILB Dont'a Hightower, Jr. Alabama. Hightower's rusty 2010 return from an ACL injury doesn't merit inclusion here, but his experience -- combined with the expected return of the athleticism he flashed a freshman All-American in 2008 -- certainly does.

MLB Danny Trevathan, Sr., Kentucky. We're fudging the formation a bit with two inside 'backers and just one OLB, but it's worth it to make room for the SEC's leading tackler from a year ago.

Also watch for: the excellent tandem of Jerico Nelson and Jerry Franklin at Arkansas, or Chris Marve at Vanderbilt, or LSU's underrated Ryan Baker.

DEFENSIVE BACKS

CB Tyrann Mathieu, Soph., LSU.
Teammate Morris Claiborne has received most of the preseason love, but Mathieu came on like gangbusters at the end of his freshman season -- culminating in an MVP performance at the Cotton Bowl -- and should be ready for an all-conference season.

CB Casey Hayward, Sr., Vanderbilt. The Commodores' disappointing 2010 wasn't Hayward's fault; his 17 passes defended led the SEC, and his six interceptions placed him second.

S Mark Barron, Sr., Alabama. His All-American status overrates him ever-so-slightly -- it's possible to get deep on Barron occasionally, if not frequently -- but no defensive back in the league (and maybe the country) has a better nose for the ball or knack for the game-changing play.

S Robert Lester, Jr., Alabama. Two Tide safeties might feel like overkill, but there's not really any arguing with numbers like these: an SEC-high eight interceptions, 12 passes defended, 52 tackles, and the Tide's league-best opposing passer rating of just 103.56.

Also watch for: Tennessee's Janzen Jackson, now that he's reportedly reported to camp in great shape after his layoff; Claiborne, obviously; Razorback safety Tramain Thomas; Georgia corner Brandon Boykin; and oh, fine, Stephon Gilmore. We don't think netting two pass breakups and three picks for a Gamecock pass defense ranked 97th in the country adds up to being an All-SEC player, but we're in the minority.

SPECIALISTS

P Drew Butler, Sr., Georgia; PK Blair Walsh, Sr., Georgia.
We wish the Bulldog specialists the best of luck in their 11th year in Athens. (No, we refuse to believe the pair of them have only had four years of eligibility each.)

Posted on: March 15, 2011 11:52 am
 

Spring Practice Primer: Arkansas

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

College football has no offseason. Every coach knows that the preparation for September begins now, in Spring Practice. So we here at the Eye on College Football will get you ready as teams open spring ball with our Spring Practice Primers . Today, we look at Nebraska , who opened spring camp on Saturday.

Spring Practice Question: There's no Ryan Mallett. So what is there, exactly?

We'll go ahead and spoil what we expect to be answer this spring: a whole heck of a lot.

But first, let's look at what the Razorbacks are missing without college football's most famous modified razor scooter -user. First and foremost, they'll be missing -- as Mallett himself said when asked how he'd respond to questions about his college career -- "seven thousand-plus yards and 60 touchdowns in two seasons." Those kind of numbers, and the attendant fear they (and Mallett's gatling-gun arm) put into the shell-shocked defenses he faced aren't easily replaced ... if they're replaced at all.

But it's possible that if the numbers and the arm strength aren't coming back, in ascendant junior Tyler Wilson the Hogs will welcome a few new things that even Mallett couldn't offer them. For all his intimidating talent, it's telling that Mallett summed up his resume for the pros with statistics rather than wins-and-losses or championships; while his two years were immensely successful both personally and from a team standpoint (the program's first-ever BCS bowl berth is nothing to sneeze at, to say the least), Mallett never did shake the nagging feeling from many observers he could have been even better than he was. In 2009, he pulverized the Eastern Michigans on the Hog schedule but too often tried to make the spectacular throw rather than the sensible one, resulting in a 39 percent combined completion rate in Arkansas's four games against ranked opponents (all losses). Mallett was much more consistent in 2010, but Hog fans still have to wonder: what if he hadn't had that three-interception meltdown at home against Alabama? What if the final throw of his college career hadn't been another game-ending boneheaded pick in the Sugar Bowl?

So what could Wilson offer that Mallett didn't? A little more poise down the stretch of big games, and maybe even a little more within-the-offense conservatism when necessary against deep coverage. It's worth remembering three other things in Wilson's favor here, too:

1. Bobby Petrino no doubt helped make Mallett the star he was, but he doesn't need an tree-sized, cannon-armed quarterback to be successful, as he proved with players like Stefan LeFors and Brian Brohm at Louisville;

2. Wilson looked outstanding in his one relief performance of Mallett last season, hitting 25-of-34 against Auburn for 332 yards and four touchdowns, nearly leading the Hogs out of a sizable deficit for what would have been a season-defining victory;

3. He won't have to carry the offense himself, and in fact won't have to carry much of it at all.

Per point No. 3, why not? Because in emerging workhorse running back Knile Davis (who topped 1,000 yards in the last nine games alone) and the senior wide receiving trio of Joe Adams, Jarius Wright and Greg Childs, no quarterback in the SEC (and maybe the country) should receive more support from his fellow skill position players that Wilson. He doesn't have to be Mallett to replace him.

And while most of the attention from Razorback fans this spring will likely center on whether the offense keeps humming, the Arkansas defense could be preparing for its best season yet under Petrino. Linebackers Jerry Franklin and Jerico Nelson both return for their senior seasons after finishing 1-2 on the team in tackles and 1-3 in tackles-for-loss a year ago; end Jake Bequette dominated in flashes last year, totaled a team-leading seven sacks, and could be poised for an All-SEC season; and the safety-corner combo of Tramain Thomas and Darius Winston look ready to pick up where last year's tag-team of Ramon Broadway and Rudell Crim left off.

So: the defense should be better. The running game and the receivers are in place. Which will turn all eyes towards Wilson this spring to see if he can deliver on the promise he showed against Auburn. If he can, even the loss of a wunderkind like Mallett might not be the kind of blow his reputation the past two seasons suggested it would be.

Posted on: January 2, 2011 12:12 pm
 

CBS Bowl Bonanza: Sugar Bowl

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The Basics: Ohio State (11-1) vs. Arkansas (10-2), Jan. 4, 8:30pm ET

Why You Should Watch: This game will feature one of the more interesting matchups in the BCS this season, and in the bowl games.  On one side you have a program that is no stranger to the BCS, nor to facing an SEC opponent (Ohio State is 0-9 against the SEC in bowl games) while there in Ohio State.  The other side has a team that's looking around like "Wow."  Arkansas has had some success in the last decade, but the Sugar Bowl isn't a stage it's grown accustomed to.  In fact, this is Arkansas' first appearance in a BCS game, and first trip to the Sugar Bowl since 1980. 

It's also a clash of styles.  Ohio State presents an offense that prefers to keep things close to its sweatervest, preferring to move the ball down the field slowly, and occasionally go for the big play.  Arkansas is a team that can score from anywhere on the field at anytime, and is literally trying to score on every play.  It'll be like a poker game where one guy is pushing all his chips in on every play, and the other is just sitting around waiting for pocket aces.

Keys to Victory for Ohio State: As I mentioned above, Ohio State and Jim Tressel have a very particular approach to football, and if they're going to win this game, it's a formula they'll likely need to stick to.  Ohio State's defense is pretty strong, but the best way to keep the Arkansas offense from putting points on the board is to keep the Arkansas offense on the sideline.  So while Terrelle Pryor has plenty of talent and nice weapons in Devier Posey and Dane Sanzenbacher, the Buckeyes best bet is to keep the ball on the ground and in the hands of Brandon Saine and Dan Herron.

On defense, the goal is simple, but not easy to execute: stop Ryan Mallett.  Mallett has thrown for 3,627 yards and 30 touchdowns this season, so it will be a key for Ohio State's defense to get pressure on him and not allow him to sit in the pocket and pick apart the secondary.  Of course, while focusing on Mallett, the Buckeyes can't afford to sleep on Knile Davis.  Davis has rushed for nearly 1,200 yards and 13 touchdowns, and is often overlooked due to the Arkansas passing attack.

Keys to Victory for Arkansas: Now, we know that Arkansas has a high powered offense.  One that is 4th in the nation in passing yards with 349.2 a game, but its average of 37.3 points per game is actually below Ohio State's output of 39.4 points a game.  So we know that Mallett, Greg Childs and the rest of the Razorback offense is going to make some plays.

The key will be whether or not Arkansas' defense can stop the Buckeyes.  The Hogs have lost two games this season.  One was a shootout against Auburn that saw its defense give up 65 points to Auburn.  The other was a game in which the Hogs only managed 20 points against Alabama.  Ohio State will be the toughest defense Arkansas has faced since that game, and the Arkansas defense will have to do its part to keep the Hogs in the game.  To do this the Hogs will have to make Pryor one-dimensional.  Either take away the pass and force him to beat you with his legs, or take away the running lanes and force him to beat you with his arm.

The Sugar Bowl is like: Well, it's like a big bowl of sugar.  It tastes really good, gets you incredibly excited, but in the end, you're just going to crash and it won't really mean anything in the bigger picture.  Of course, that won't stop you from doing it all over again.
Posted on: November 17, 2010 9:47 am
 

Arkansas TE probable for Mississippi State

Posted by Chip Patterson

Arkansas' has not had any trouble continuing to put up big numbers even without leading receiver Greg Childs, out for the season with a patellar tendon injury.  Since Childs was injured in the fourth quarter against Vanderbilt, the Razorbacks scored 41 on South Carolina in Columbia, then dropped 58 on the helpless UTEP Miners.  But heading into a crucial two-game stretch to finish the season, quarterback Ryan Mallett will need as many healthy weapons as he can get.  After leaving UTEP game in the third quarter with a shoulder injury, there was some question as to the health of tight end D.J. Williams.  

Head coach Bobby Petrino said Williams' status is probable for Saturday's game at Mississippi State.  Williams is second on the team in receptions behind the injured Childs, so having the senior tight end on the field is a big boost for the Mallett and the Arkansas offense.  After Mississippi State, the Razorbacks host LSU for their regular season finale.  Their chances for the SEC Championship Game have come and gone, but the Razorbacks are high enough in the BCS Standings to make a case for the Sugar Bowl should they win out.  Granted, taking down Mississippi State in Starkville and LSU is a tall order for this Razorbacks squad.  But considering their only losses have come against Auburn and Alabama, there is no reason to think that it is not out of their reach.     
Posted on: November 2, 2010 2:22 pm
 

Hogs vs. Commodores yields bad blood

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

49-14 Vanderbilt losses like the one the Commodores suffered Saturday at Arkansas haven't been that uncommon over the years. By the time the victor has finished padding their stats and the usual condescedning platitudes about the Vandy effort have been written, it's typically time to simply move on to the next potential 'Dore drubbing. (Up this week: Florida !)

But this has proven to be one blowout with surprisingly long -- and acrimnious -- legs. For one thing, the game has proven to be the final one of the year for key contributors on both sides, as both Razorback receiver Greg Childs and Commodore running back Warren Norman have been ruled out for the rest of the season with a patellar tendon injury and a dislocated right wrist , respectively. This space has already commented on the impact of the loss of Childs on the Hog attack, but Norman's injury could be an even greater blow for the already-struggling Commodore offense; the SEC leader in all-purpose yardage a year ago, Norman was Vandy's leading rusher, kickoff returner, ball-carrier, and touchdown-scorer.

But at least those injuries occurred during the normal run-of-play of the game (though Bobby Petrino has had to answer questions about why Childs was still playing in the fourth quarter of a three-touchdown game). Petrino is of the opinion that the same can't be said of the knock taken by freshman Arkansas defensive tackle Byran Jones :

 

Petrino said Monday defensive tackle Byran Jones was injured on a “dirty, bad play” in the Razorbacks’ win over Vanderbilt Saturday.

Jones, a freshman, went down on the Commodores’ first offensive possession and didn’t return with an ankle injury. His status for this weekend’s game against South Carolina is uncertain.

“It was a bad-looking play,” Petrino said. “It’s a shame, because the guy blocked him and Byran took off running and the guy clipped him from behind on his ankle. Terrible way to get hurt because it was a dirty, bad play, and it’s unfortunate.
For their part, it's doubtful Vandy will be expressing too much symapthy. The Hogs were called for a pair of chop blocks during the game, and the 'Dors are claiming the rude reception in Fayetteville went well beyond the scoreboard :
Vanderbilt equipment manager Luke Wyatt confirmed that the two ball boys (college students) that the Commodores provided to work on the Arkansas sideline required protection after being verbally abused and physically pushed by a member of the Razorbacks' support staff in the early stages of the game.

Wyatt notified state troopers on the field of the situation at halftime to make sure they were not bothered or touched the rest of the way. Vanderbilt coaches are aware of the situation.
Coaches sniping at the opponents? Season-ending injuries? Chop blocks? State troopers called in to keep the ballboys safe? This is not your typical Vanderbilt rout. And after all of this, it's highly likely that next year's rematch in Nashville won't be either. It's rare that any Commodore game makes for appointment viewing, but that one just might.
Posted on: November 1, 2010 4:46 pm
Edited on: November 1, 2010 4:50 pm
 

Arkansas loses WR Greg Childs for season

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Arkansas ' passing game took a major hit this weekend when Greg Childs , the Razorbacks' leading receiver both this season and last, suffered a season-ending knee injury . According to head coach Bobby Petrino , Childs injured the patellar tendon in his knee -- the same tendon that Notre Dame quarterback Dayne Crist ruptured the same day , incidentally -- and the surgery and rehab will sideline Childs for 4-6 months, or well past bowl season.

Some fans will likely wonder why Childs was even playing when he was injured; his injury occurred in the fourth quarter of a game the Razorbacks would win by a 49-14 margin over hapless Vanderbilt . And yes, that's a fair question. At the same time, there's nothing about playing with a large lead that makes a player more susceptible to injury or anything; it's just rotten luck that it happened late in the contest and not, say, early next week. Or three weeks ago. Or whenever. It happened, and now Arkansas has to move on.

If there's any consolation, it's that the injury likely derails any hope Childs might have had of declaring early for the NFL draft. Childs has prototypical size and speed, but if he can't run at 100% at the combine, there's really no sense in beginning the pro process at that point. As for his collegiate career, spring ball is probably out of the question, but Childs doesn't need those reps as much as the younger players anyway; his on-field abilities are well-established as it is. By the time Childs gets through summer and fall practices, he should be 100% full speed for Week 1, and that'll be bad news for the rest of the SEC next season.



Posted on: September 18, 2010 3:10 pm
Edited on: September 18, 2010 3:19 pm
 

Arkansas scores go-ahead TD with 0:15 left

Posted by Adam Jacobi

[UPDATE, 3:13 p.m.: Arkansas has forced a punt with a quarterback sack on 3rd and 4. This one's probably going to overtime.]

[UPDATE, 3:15 p.m.: OH HO HO DISREGARD OVERTIME. Ryan Mallett needed only three throws to lead the Razorbacks 73 yards, culminating in a 40-yard touchdown catch by Greg Childs. DAGGER.]

[UPDATE, 3:20 p.m.: A Georgia Hail Mary fell incomplete in the end zone. Final score: Arkansas 31, Georgia 24.]

What looked like a convincing road win for Arkansas is now in serious danger. The Razorbacks led Georgia 24-10 in the fourth quarter, but two consecutive touchdowns have tied the score--and now Arkansas is punting on 4th and 21 after a three-and-out.

Georgia now has 2:18 to get into scoring position from their own 34-yard line, and they've got all three of their timeouts. They'll need Washaun Ealey to continue his clutch play if they want to make this last drive happen.

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The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com