Tag:Harvey Perlman
Posted on: January 13, 2012 3:51 pm
Edited on: January 13, 2012 5:17 pm
 

NCAA looking to cut football scholarships

Posted by Bryan Fischer

INDIANAPOLIS -- As part of sweeping changes stemming from a Presidential retreat in August, an NCAA working group will recommend to the organization's Board of Directors that FBS-level football scholarships be cut from 85 to 80 starting in 2014.

The proposal was among the most controversal to be discussed at a Division I session Friday morning at the annual NCAA convention, with several school leaders quite outspoken about the issue.

"What you see with these proposals is an effort to restrain spending at the expense of student-athletes," Harvey Perlman, chancellor of Nebraska, said. "The working group says if you reduce scholarships and other expenses you can reallocate it to other things for student-athletes. But the problem is, I don't know of an athletic department that won't spend every penny it has.

"I just think this is bad publicity and I think it's bad policy."

Georgia president Dr. Michael Adams chaired the group responsible and was put in the precarious position of leading the charge of several unpopular measures.

"Of all the things I've done the last 30 years at the NCAA, this is the most unpopular. I have the scars to show for it," Adams said. "There's a notion that we are a runaway train in Division I with less regard for student-athletes than the people who are making the exorbitant salaries. We need to put a stake down somewhere."

A good portion of the administrators speaking at a Q&A session about the new proposals - at large schools and small - sided with Perlman and cited issues with taking away opportunities not only to play football but earn a degree.

"It's pretty hard to see it any other way," said Perlman. "There's public concern about universities generating all these resources and not giving it to student-athletes. So the response is we're going to cut scholarships and other kinds of things? It doesn't make sense to me."

Adams is an interesting choice to lead the charge to cut spending at schools across the country. The Bulldogs have one of the healthiest athletics departments in the country and the football team was the second-most profitable in the country behind Texas last year. He understands that while others disagree with some of the details, there is a reason why the working group has been tasked to do what it has been working on.

"I think we've been running headlong into a cliff and now is a time to start pushing things back a little," he said. "I'm first of all an academic. I'm a big sports fan but I want the academic process to drive things and not the athletic process."

Coaches have been outspoken about the cuts as well. It was discussed at the AFCA Coaches Convention prior to the NCAA meetings and it's opposed in greater numbers among their ranks than those that headed to Indianapolis.

"The divide between presidents and AD's on one side and coaches is a pretty wide gulf," Adams said. "I don't want to fight with anybody. But on some of these issues I think there needs to be reasonable compromise to protect the academic process and, secondly, deal with the economic realities of the world we're now living in. My faculty hasn't had a raise in three years and a lot of them think what they see in athletics has a lot of excess in it."

The scholarship proposal also calls for a cut in the number of FCS scholarships by three - from 63 to 60 - and will be sent to the Board of Directors on Saturday to be voted on.

Posted on: November 10, 2011 11:57 am
 

Husker chancellor hopes fans "will be respectful"

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

For those that were wondering: there is no chance Saturday's game between Penn State and Nebraska will be postponed, at least not if the signals out of both State College and Lincoln are any indication.

Not only is new Nittany Lion interim head coach Tom Bradley's first press conference being conducted without question as to a possible cancellation, but a statement Wednesday from Nebraska chancellor Harvy Perlman indicates that no one at Penn State's Saturday opponent is preparing for a postponement, either.

"I hope all fans will be respectful of the contest between these student-athletes, even as we share in the outrage of what is alleged," Perlman said, adding that the Huskers' participation "in no way condones" the actions of the accused officials at Penn State in the Jerry Sandusky case.

"In the end the game is about the student-athletes from both institutions who have worked hard to be in a position to play football on Saturday," Perlman said.

The full text of his statement -- which also offers support for ousted Penn State president Graham Spainer -- reads as follows:
"Graham Spanier is a great personal friend of mine and a longtime supporter of the University of Nebraska who left this institution a better place than when he arrived. Everything I know about Graham makes it difficult for me to believe he would ignore clear allegations of child abuse. I can only wish him the best as he works through these tragic events.

"This has obviously been a very emotional week for the Penn State community. We hope for the best for everyone, particularly the children alleged to have been mistreated or exploited. The allegations of abuse, if true, represent personal failings. Penn State, our Big Ten colleague, is still a great university.

"Looking ahead to Saturday's game, others will pour many issues into this football game. Nebraska's participation in no way condones the conduct that has been alleged or makes a statement about the truth or falsity of the allegations. In the end the game is about the student-athletes from both institutions who have worked hard to be in a position to play football on Saturday. I hope all fans will be respectful of the contest between these student-athletes, even as we share in the outrage of what is alleged and the pain suffered by the victims."
Understandably lost in the off-field furor surrounding the Nittany Lion program this week is that the game will play a pivotal role in deciding the winner of both Big Ten divisions. For more on the game, view the CBSSports.com PSU-Nebraska Pregame page.
Posted on: November 22, 2010 1:46 pm
Edited on: November 22, 2010 1:47 pm
 

Bo Pelini is sorry, everybody

Posted by Tom Fornelli



If you watched the game between Nebraska and Texas A&M on Saturday night, you had a front row seat to a special viewing of Bo Pelini bursting any ear drums that dared get within five feet of him.  Pelini wasn't very happy with the officials on Saturday night, as his team was called for sixteen penalties in the game, compared to the two that were called on the Aggies.  

Still, Pelini's rage and spittle weren't reserved solely for the officials.  The cameras caught him tearing into quarterback Taylor Martinez on the sidelines after Martinez had returned from having his ankle looked at in the locker room.  That incident led to some rumors that Martinez had quit the team on Sunday, which were refuted on Sunday night, and also led to Nebraska chancellor Harvey Perlman publically reprimanding the head coach about his behavior.

Now, unsurprisingly, Pelini is apologizing for the way he behaved on Saturday night.  Pelini said that while he doesn't think it's wrong for a head coach to yell at officials during a game, he did believe it was wrong to "make it personal" and that on Saturday night he "let it get personal."

Personally, I don't find any of this to be that big of a deal. Football coaches have a tendency to yell at players and officials all the time, as I know I've been on the receiving end of such tirades myself.  Plus, it's not like this is anything new from Pelini.  I recall seeing him chew out Ndamukong Suh during a game against Virginia Tech in 2008, and Suh turned out just fine.  Frankly, I think the only problem with any of this is the fact that it had been caught by cameras in a nationally televised game.
 
 
 
 
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