Tag:Hillar Moore III
Posted on: September 21, 2011 1:04 pm
Edited on: September 21, 2011 1:12 pm
 

QB Jefferson to take stand as grand jury convenes

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

Jordan Jefferson
will have the opportunity to tell the court his version of the Aug. 19 bar fight that resulted in his felony arrest--in his own words.

That's the news from Jefferson attorney Lewis Unglesby, who per CBSSports.com RapidReporter Glenn Guilbeau told media that Jefferson would be taking the stand himself during court proceedings next week.

 "Usually the defendant doesn't testify, but Jordan has consistently held the same position," Unglesby said. "He didn't do it."

This news arrives as the local court convenes a grand jury to determine whether ot not to indict Jefferson on his felony second-degree battery charge. According to District Attorney Hillar Moore III, the grand jury could elect to indict the senior quarterback, reduce his charges, or throw them out altogether.

"We want the jury to hear all sides so they can make the appropriate charges, if any," Moore said. He added that the level of "misinformation" and "confusion" surrounding the case has made the grand jury testimony necessary so the conflicting witness accounts can be presented "under oath and under the potential penalty of perjury."

Jefferson apparently won't be the only LSU player testifying to his innocence. Moore also revealed that 18 different Tiger teammates had signed "witness testimony" to the effect that Jefferson had done nothing wrong in the bar fight. Michael Bienvenu, attorney for four non-players injured in the fight, did offer that the players coming forward now -- after the arrests have already been made -- "looks suspicious" from his and his clients' point-of-view.

(Not surprisingly, Les Miles was happy that so many members of his team had come to their teammate's aid. But he was also less than thrilled that so many members had eelcted to break the team's curfew in the first place.)

Now, we're certainly no lawyers. But between

1. The lack of DNA evidence indicting Jefferson (and fellow accused teammate Josh Johns)
2. A DA who seems less-than-entirely-confident in the grand jury following through on the felony battery charge
3. The amount of witness testimony that would seem to exonerate Jefferson (even if testimony also exists that would condemn him)
4. A primary accuser who may not be entirely credible

the prevailing legal trend here would seem to be one in Jefferson's favor. It's not responsible to speculate on what conclusions the grand jury might reach -- or what those conclusiosn might mean for LSU, merrily plugging along with Jarrett Lee at quarterback -- but the door towards a Jefferson return at least appears to be open a crack. For now.
 
 
 
 
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