Tag:Jeff Stoutland
Posted on: August 16, 2011 11:39 pm
Edited on: August 16, 2011 11:53 pm
 

Former staffers mum following Miami report

Posted by Bryan Fischer

While most of the attention from the exhausting Yahoo! Sports report detailing impermissible benefits from Miami booster Nevin Shapiro was focused on the 72 athletes named, there were seven current or former Hurricanes staff members named as having knowledge or direct participation of violations. Because several are no longer at the school, the potential impact of the NCAA investigation is not limited to Coral Gables.

Clint Hurtt
Detailed allegations
Previous position at Miami: The Hurricanes' defensive line coach and recruiting coordinator for three years.
Current position: Defensive line coach and recruiting coordinator at Louisville.
Statement: According to WAVE3, Louisville put out a statement saying they would not be responding to any accusations.

Jeff Stoutland
Detailed allegations
Previous position at Miami: Was offensive line coach for the Hurricanes for four years. He was also the interim head coach following the departure of Randy Shannon.
Current position: Became the offensive line coach and assistant head coach at Alabama in January.
Statement: Alabama released a statement saying they were aware of the story but would not comment, according to The Birmingham News.

Aubrey Hill
Detailed allegations
Previous position at Miami: Wide receivers coach for three years.
Current position: Wide receivers coach for Florida.
Statement: Florida issued a statement saying that while Hill declined comment to Yahoo!, he was comfortable and confident with how he conducted himself at Miami, according to The Orlando Sentinel.

Joe Pannunzio
Detailed allegations
Previous position at Miami: Tight ends and special teams coach for five years.
Current position: Director of Football Operations at Alabama.
Statement: Alabama released a statement saying they were aware of the story but would not comment.

Miami report fallout
Sean Allen
Detailed allegations
Previous position at Miami: Student manager from 2001-2005.
Current position: Returned to the school as an assistant equipment manager in 2009.
Statement: Miami provided a statement early Tuesday saying they were fully cooperating with the NCAA investigation. As an employee, Allen is required to cooperate or face a possible show-cause penalty.

Ralph Nogueras
Detailed allegations
Position at Miami: assistant equipment manager
Statement: The school provided a statement early Tuesday saying they were fully cooperating with the NCAA investigation.





Posted on: March 21, 2011 4:01 pm
 

Spring Practice Primer: Alabama

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

College Football has no offseason. Every coach knows that the preparation for September begins now, in Spring Practice . So we here at the Eye on College Football  will get you ready as teams open spring ball with our Spring Practice Primers . Today, we look at Alabama , who starts spring practice today .

Spring Practice Question: Does Alabama have the offense to win another national championship? Or, alternatively, do they really need one?

As spring practice opens today in Tuscaloosa, most eyes are going to be on the revamped Tide offense, and with good reason; with no Greg McElroy, no Mark Ingram, and no Julio Jones, the Alabama attack is going to undergo a more thorough overhaul than any it's undergone since Jones and Ingram burst onto the scene in 2008.

But it's also because there's not a lot for most eyes to see on the Tide defense. With 9 or 10 starters back from a unit already ranked fifth in the nation in total defense, including the entirety of the Tide's linebacking and secondary groups with those including All-American safety Mark Barron and potential All-American linebacker Dont'a Hightower , on paper this will certainly be one of the FBS's best defenses. And the Tide may look even better on the field than they do on paper; after last year's (relative) 10-3 disappointment and occasional backbreaking defensive letdowns (as vs. Auburn and LSU), there's little doubt Nick Saban is going to be at his most firebreathingly intense (and most scrupulously detailed) this offseason.

In short, the defensive show put on this spring isn't likely to be any different from what Tide observers already saw prior to the Tide's undefeated regular seasons in 2008 and 2009. The offense, on the other hand, has several issues to resolve:

Quarterback: Certainly the most high-profile of those issues, the starting quarterback job will be contested this spring by sophomore A.J. McCarron and redshirt freshman Phillip Sims. McCarron boasts the advantages of an extra year in Jim McElwain's offense and a modicum of playing time in 2010 (that's him at right in the Tide's laugher against Duke), but in the end Saban seems likely to select whichever quarterback can be safer with the ball. Opposite that defense, playmaking ability may come second in importance to not-turnover-making ability. That goes double considering the ...

Offensive line: One of college football's biggest mysteries during the 2010 season was why a previously dominant rushing attack featuring a Heisman Trophy winner at tailback and an offensive line loaded with both talent and experience wound up seventh in the SEC in total rushing in conference games. Don't expect Saban to let it happen again, Ingram or no Ingram, with new line coach Jeff Stoutland lighting a fire under talents like former five-star tackle D.J. Fluker, All-SEC guard Barrett Jones, and veteran center William Vlachos. Still, Tide fans will no doubt want to be reassured that numbers like the 2.3 yards per-carry Alabama averaged in their three losses a year ago are a thing of the past.

More SEC
Receivers: Of McElroy, Ingram, and Jones, it's easy to see how McElroy (with the McCarron-Sims duo) and Ingram (with Trent Richardson) might be replaced. With Jones, it's a different story, as projected starting seniors Darius Hanks and Marquis Maze have--to this point in their careers--been more steady possession types than Jones-style uber-athletic gamebreakers. Again, the Tide likely won't need a Jones-style gamebreaker if the defense and running game return to their 2009 form, but it will nonetheless bear close watching to see if Hanks and Maze (or fellow senior Brandon Gibson or sophomore Kenny Bell or anyone else) can add at least a little explosiveness to the passing game.

The running backs aren't nearly as much of a question mark; after biding his time for two years alongside Ingram, Richardson should be ready to fully establish himself one of the SEC's best, and even if he's not (or struggles with injuries), powerful sophomore Eddie Lacy or true freshman (and spring enrollee) Dee Hart should be able to pick up the slack. Pair them with the defense described above, and it's easy to see the Tide making a run at yet another national title if the line can get back to its road-grading ways and the passing attack can be simply competent.

How big an "if" is that? We'll start to find out these next few weeks, and there's no doubt plenty of observers across the SEC (and maybe the country) hoping it proves bigger than we expect it to be.

Posted on: January 21, 2011 1:25 pm
 

More turnover for Tide as Cignetti takes D-II job

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

After Alabama followed up their national championship season with a disappointing -- by preseason No. 1 standards, anyway -- 10-3 campaign, it's no surprise that the Crimson Tide underwent some mild turnover on their coaching staff. Defensive line coach Bo Davis was hired away by Texas for the same position without what seemed like much resistance or counter-offering from Nick Saban and the Tide. And offensive line coach Joe Pendry retired, to be replaced -- immediately -- by former Miami assistant Jeff Stoutland.

If Davis and Pendry were fully committed to staying in Tuscaloosa, they probably still would be. But after the Tide arguably underachieved this season along both lines of scrimmage, and given how prepared he appeared to be for their departures, it's also doubtful Saban lost too much sleep over those changes.

But there's now fewer than two weeks remaining before Signing Day, and if losing two coaches might be useful to keep the staff fresh and motivated, replacing a third of your assistants in one offseason probably qualifies as a headache. And it's now a headache Saban will have to deal with as Tide receivers coach and recruiting coordinator Curt Cignetti has taken the head coaching job at Division II Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Unlike Davis and Pendry, Cignetti's motivations are perfectly transparent; IUP is the same school where his father Frank Cignetti coached for 19 seasons. But also unlike Davis's and Pendry's departures, Cignetti's decision leaves Saban scrambling (well, for a given definition of "scramble") to have the position filled before Signing Day. And though few coaches would say no to drawing a Crimson Tide salary and coaching Tide-grade talent, the lateness of the vacancy means the pool of candidates might be somewhat shallower than it would be otherwise.

Even those concerns would usually be trifling ones for Saban's well-oiled machine, but that machine is showgin some minor wear-and-tear on the recruiting trail for what might be the first time in Saban's Capstone tenure. Blue-chip in-state linebacker-slash-running back recruit Brent Calloway recently flipped his commitment from the Tide to Auburn. Major wide receiver recruit Malcolm Mitchell chose home-state Georgia over the Tide last night, despite speculation he had been an Alabama lean. And there are indications the Tide may be unable to pull the nation's consensus No. 1 recruit, defensive end Jadeveon Clowney, away from hometown South Carolina.

Arguably no program in the country is better-equipped to withstand those kinds of setbacks, or whatever other setbacks might arise as a result of Cignetti's exit. The Tide will be fine. But when the expectations are nothing less than annual contention for a national title, even minor stumbles can prove to be major developments.

Posted on: January 12, 2011 6:56 pm
Edited on: January 12, 2011 7:04 pm
 

UM O-line coach joins Saban at Alabama

Posted by Chip Patterson

New Miami head coach Al Golden did not decide to retain many members of Randy Shannon's staff when he arrived in Coral Gables to take over the Hurricanes program.  Some of the few pieces he did keep are reportedly migrating to the SEC.

Wide receivers coach Aubrey Hill recently left to join Will Muschamp's staff at Florida after originally being retained by Golden.  Now offensive line coach Jeff Stoutland is making a similar move, joining Nick Saban's staff at Alabama.  The Miami Herald is reporting that Stoutland, who served as Miami's interim coach for the 33-17 loss to Notre Dame in the Sun Bowl, will assume Joe Pendry's role in Tuscaloosa as the offensive line coach.  Pendry, 63, is retiring from coaching after 30+ years in the collegiate and professional ranks.  He was the only offensive line coach under Saban at Alabama, and served as assistant head coach in 2010.  

Stoutland was reportedly well-liked by the Miami players, and should be a good fit for Saban.  As for Miami, Golden is now left with plenty of positions to fill on the offensive end.  In addition to filling Stoutland's spot on the offensive line, he still needs to hire an offensive coordinator.  Stoutland's departure also only leaves one coach, linebackers coach Michael Barrow, from Randy Shannon's staff in Miami.
Posted on: December 31, 2010 7:09 pm
Edited on: December 31, 2010 7:11 pm
 

Bowl Grades: Sun Bowl

Posted by Tom Fornelli

Notre Dame never breaks a sweat during 33-17 win over Miami in El Paso

Notre Dame

Offense: Tommy Rees probably isn't the best quarterback on scholarship at Notre Dame, but he's proven that sometimes there's more to the quarterback position than talent.  The Irish improved to 4-0 on the season when Rees starts, though even Rees would tell you it's a lot easier to play quarterback when you have a talented wide receiver like Michael Floyd at your disposal.

Floyd says he hasn't made a decision as to whether or not he'll return for his senior season, but there are likely some NFL scouts drooling after his Sun Bowl MVP performance on Friday.  Floyd finished the game with 6 receptions for 106 yards and two touchdowns.  Still, as nice as Floyd was for the Irish, the real key to their success was the running game, which racked up over 200 yards behind Cierre Wood, Robert Hughes and Theo Riddick.  If it weren't for the Irish offense slowing down a bit in the second half -- which is understandable considering the game was already over at halftime -- I'd be giving them a higher grade than this.  Grade: B+

Defense: The Notre Dame defense had flown a bit under the radar this season, and came into the Sun Bowl allowing only one touchdown in the last 12 quarters of play.  That one touchdown was by USC, and it was a four-play three-yard drive following a turnover.  The Irish stretched that streak to 15 quarters before Miami found its way into the end zone, and forced four turnovers on the day with safety Harrison Smith intercepting three passes by himself.

Miami finished the game with over 400 yards and 17 points of offense, but just about all of those came when the game was well out of reach late. Grade: A

Coaching: Brian Kelly didn't come to South Bend with the same fanfare that Charlie Weis and Ty Willingham did, but it's starting to look as though he may finally be the head coach that restores the winning tradition of Notre Dame.  The Irish attacked Miami's defense early and built a big enough lead that it was able to coast through the second half, and Bob Diaco's defense stuffed Miami's running game and forced Jacory Harris to throw.  And when you force Jacory Harris to throw, it's but a matter of time before the turnovers happen.  Grade: A

Miami

Offense: It was really a tale of two quarterbacks for Miami.  Jacory Harris came into the game looking to redeem himself and just made things worse.  Here's what you need to know about Harris' day: he completed seven passes.  Only four of them were completed to Miami receivers, the other three ended up in the hands of Notre Dame.

Stephen Morris came on, and though he threw an interception of his own, Miami's offense looked a lot better while he was in the game.  Morris threw for 283 yards and two touchdowns, and even though a lot came in garbage time, the fact he didn't quit says a lot about him.  Had he played the entire game, the outcome may have been a bit different.  Grade: D

Defense: I can't blame Miami's defense for this one, as Jacory Harris didn't put them in a very good position in the first half. Hard as it may be to believe given the outcome of the game, I was actually impressed with Miami's defense in this game for the final three quarters.  Even though the outcome of the game was never really in doubt, Miami's defense never stopped playing, and kept holding Notre Dame to field goals.  Marcus Fortson, in particular, was impressive in the second half, frequently disrupting life in the Notre Dame backfield. 

All that being said, however, Miami's defense never made a play to bail out its offense either. Grade:C+

Coaching: I do not envy the task that Jeff Stoutland had going into this game.  A lame duck coach filling in for the recently fired Randy Shannon, and in charge of a team that seemed to lose interest in the 2010 season over a month ago.  My only qualm with anything he did was starting Harris over Morris at quarterback, but given the fact that Morris sprained his ankle in practice, I can't even blame him for that. Grade: Incomplete

Final Grade

If you were tuning into this game hoping to see a classic like the meetings between these teams in the late 80s, then you were no doubt disappointed. Still, the game was a microcosm of the directions these once mighty programs seem to be going.  Each team has plenty of work left to do, but Notre Dame seems to have already taken the first step back to respectability, while Miami needs to build a foundation first.  Grade: D

Posted on: December 30, 2010 2:16 pm
 

CBS Bowl Bonanza: Sun Bowl

Posted by Tom Fornelli

The Basics: Notre Dame (7-5) vs. Miami (7-5), 2pm EST, CBS

Why You Should Watch: This is a pretty interesting matchup, not just for the teams playing in it, but because of the history between these two schools.  It's not quite the Catholics vs. Convicts matchups of the late 80s and early 90s, as neither team has been all that successful the last few years, but a win in this game could be another step on the path back to the top of the polls.  Plus it's on CBS!

Keys to Victory for Notre Dame: Ever since Dayne Crist went down during a loss against Tulsa, Tommy Rees has stepped in and played well, and the Irish haven't lost since.  Sure, Rees hasn't exactly been tearing it up in Crist's absence, but he's been managing the offense extremely well for a freshman, and the Irish have also seen their running game get going.

In order to beat Miami, the Irish will have to keep that formula going.  It was good enough to beat Utah and USC, and it could work against Miami as well.  The key will be for the offensive line to give Rees time, as the Miami pass rush will be better than any he has faced thus far.

Still, as well as Rees has played, the real reason Notre Dame has won its last three games has been the play of the defense.  The Irish have only allowed 22 points over those three games, and if they can pressure Jacory Harris it's only a matter of time before he makes a mistake.

Keys to Victory for Miami: Miami has the talent edge in this matchup.  The question is what the team's motivations will be.  The Hurricanes are playing for an interim coach in Jeff Stoutland, and you really have to wonder how badly they even want to play this game, or if they'd rather just move on.

We know that Jacory Harris will come to play as this is his last chance to redeem what's been a terrible 2010 season.  Still, that could work against Miami.  Harris' biggest problem has always been his patience, and it will be key for him to not try and do too much.  Just take what the Irish defense gives him, and move the ball down the field.

On defense, the key will be to get to Rees.  Pressure him into making mistakes, and keep the running game in check.    If Miami can do this, and the offense limits mistakes and turnovers, then there's no reason that Miami can't win this game.

The Sun Bowl is like: that fight between Evander Holyfield and Mike Tyson, the rematch, in 1997.  Yes, Holyfield was still the champion at the time, but neither fighter was the same as the ones we'd seen earlier in their careers.  Still, a win in this game, much like that title fight, would help bring some legitimacy back to either program.  I just hope that nobody bites anybody's ear off.
Posted on: December 30, 2010 9:59 am
Edited on: December 30, 2010 1:04 pm
 

UPDATE: Jacory Harris named starter for Sun Bowl

Posted by Chip Patterson

UPDATE - Interim coach Jeff Stoutland announced at a joint press conference on Thursday that Jacory Harris would be the starting quarterback against Notre Dame.  He did also say that if Stephen Morris is needed, "he'll be available."  The situation sounds like a flip-flop of the South Florida game, with Morris starting and Harris "available."  We saw two quarterbacks against the Bulls, so it could happen again in the Sun Bowl. 

---------------------------------

As Miami prepares to try and put an end to a tumultuous season in the Sun Bowl against Notre Dame on Friday, it seems fitting that on Thursday morning the quarterback situation is still not resolved.  Jacory Harris is expected to get the start, filling in for injured quarterback Stephen Morris.  Morris, who won the job after filling in for the injured Harris earlier in the season, sprained his ankle in Tuesday's practice.  Harris has been practicing with the first team, but interim coach Jeff Stoutland says that Morris has not been ruled out yet.

"He's way better than we thought he would be,'' Stoutland said after practice on Wednesday. "After I left you guys yesterday and I checked on him, I thought it was going to be, you know I didn't expect [him to be that much improved."

Harris has not started a game since October 30, when he sustained a concussion against Virginia that put him out for nearly a month.  When Harris was cleared to play by doctors, former head coach Randy Shannon kept Morris in the starting position.  Harris did get to see the field in the regular season finale against South Florida, but even leading Miami to 20 second half points wasn't enough to squeak out the victory in the 23-20 overtime loss.  Harris was mostly efficient in the outing, completing 12 of 18 passes for 118 yards.  But it was a costly interception (his 12th in nine games of action) that reminded many Hurricanes fans the frustrations of having Harris under center.  

The decision on the starting quarterback is expected to come on Thursday.  After another day of rest, the staff will make a determination on Morris' status.  Despite his apparent loyaly towards Morris, Stoutland still is confident in Harris should he be the starter.  He made a point to compliment Harris' preparation for the game, saying he is "on his 'A' game right now mentally."

Notre Dame has seen some great offenses this season.  Regardless of who is under center, the necessity to limit the mistakes will still hold utmost importance for the Hurricanes success.

  


Posted on: December 29, 2010 12:33 pm
 

Stephen Morris hurts ankle in practice

Posted by Tom Fornelli

We're only a few days away from the Sun Bowl yet we still haven't been told who will be starting at quarterback for the Miami Hurricanes.  Interim head coach Jeff Stoutland has kept a wraps on his plans since taking the job over, and has had Stephen Morris and Jacory Harris in a competition throughout practices.  Odds are that Stoutland will never tell anyone what his plans are until just before game time, or it's possible he won't say anything at all and everyone will just have to wait and see when the game starts.

Of course, even if Stoutland doesn't plan on showing his cards before the game, there are other ways of figuring these things out.  For example, the fact that Morris was on crutches after injuring his ankle in practice on Tuesday can't bode well for his chances.

Morris hurt the ankle while taking snaps with the first team and fell down.  It's not clear exactly what he did to the ankle, but he could not put any weight on it afterward, and had to use crutches to get around.  Which means that it's likely Jacory Harris will get one more shot to redeem himself in 2010.

Though this isn't just a chance to put a nice bow on what's been a disappointing season for Harris.  It's also a chance to give himself a step up in the competition for the job next season when Al Golden takes over.  After all, it's hard to impress NFL scouts and erase doubts about your abilities from the bench.
 
 
 
 
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