Tag:Joe Paterno out
Posted on: November 9, 2011 11:29 pm
Edited on: November 10, 2011 12:14 am
 

Tom Bradley named PSU interim coach

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

When the Penn State Board of Trustees fired Joe Paterno on Wednesday night, he had to be replaced. Not surprisingly, that replacement is longtime Paterno assistant Tom Bradley.

Ironically, Bradley is the man who replaced Jerry Sandusky -- who is at the heart of the controversy that ended up getting Paterno fired -- as the Nittany Lions' defensive coordinator in 1999.

A native of Johnstown, Pa., Bradley has been widely recognized as Paterno's right-hand man on the Nittany Lion staff since his promotion to defensive coordinator in 1999. But Bradley has served under Paterno in one role or another on the Lion staff for 33 years, rising from the graduate assistant level to position coach (Bradley has focused largely on the PSU secondary) and recruiting coordinator before stepping into the coordinator's chair. 

Though rarely acknowledged directly or officially, the size of Bradley's role has only increased over the past decade as Paterno's declining health has forced him to give up many duties of gameday coaching. Bradley has long been rumored the first choice to succeed Paterno if his suddenly former boss was ever forced to step aside.

Despite that, Bradley was less than shy about pursuing other jobs this previous offseason, interviewing at both Pitt and Temple for each school's head coaching positions--and ranking as a serious candidate for both. 

Amidst the chaos of Penn State football's current position, having an anchor like Bradley could -- and should -- prove to be an invaluable help in this time of crisis. After last offseason, it's fortunate for Penn State that even after those 33 years, Bradley's still around to provide that help.
Posted on: November 8, 2011 12:33 pm
Edited on: November 9, 2011 1:37 pm
 

AP: Joe Paterno to retire at season's end



Posted by Jerry Hinnen and Adam Jacobi

UPDATE - Nov. 9: The Associated Press is reporting that Joe Paterno has decided to retire at the end of the season.  


As the amount of alleged victims in the Jerry Sandusky case climbs rapidly, reports are emerging that Penn State head coach Joe Paterno's coaching career will soon come to an end. Official support for Paterno is reportedly "eroding," even as Nittany Lion fans rally in support of the longtime coach. 

The New York Times reported Tuesday that Paterno's 46 years as Nittany Lion head coach "will soon be over, perhaps within days or weeks." According to two sources familiar with top administrative discussions who spoke to the Times, talks to determine "how to manage his departure have begun."

"The board of trustees has yet to determine the precise timing of Paterno’s exit," the Times writes, "but it is clear that the man who has more victories than any other coach at college football’s top level and who made Penn State a prestigious brand will not survive to coach another season."

At least one person has come forward to dispute the Times report. Joe's son Scott Paterno said at a gathering of reporters at the Paterno household on Tuesday afternoon that "nobody has asked Joe [Paterno] to step down" and that Paterno would be coaching at Nebraska this weekend.

"There has been no contact about anything to do with anybody stepping down," said Scott. "The status quo holds. It's the same as it's always been. He's the coach at Penn State. When there's more to add I will."

Later, at Paterno's home, a crowd of hundreds gathered in an impromptu rally for the embattled head coach. Cries of "we love you, Joe" and chants of "Let Joe stay" peppered the air. Paterno emerged from his house to give a brief statement, but did not answer questions. 

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The Associated Press, citing an unnamned source close to the situation, reports Paterno's support among the Penn State board of trustees was "eroding," but that the final consequences of that lack of trust were still unclear. That source also indicated that Penn State president Graham Spanier was also the subject of waning confidence by the board, but again: the extent to which that support was fading and what that might ultimately mean isn't clear yet.

What is known, however, is that the Penn State board of trustees held an emergency meeting Tuesday night. Chairman Steve Garban acknowledged to the Associated Press that the board was "in session" when asked. A person who spoke on condition of anonymity because the schedule was not made public said the trustees were having a teleconference Tuesday evening.

The Board of Trustees released a statement Tuesday expressing outrage over the “horrifying details” of the Sandusky case. The board announced it would form a committee to investigate the “circumstances that gave rise” to the case. The statement did not mention the job status of Paterno or Spanier.

Meanwhile, reports have emerged that the number of alleged victims in the Sandusky case is growing after the state attorney general and police commissioner publicized two phone numbers to help potential victims contact investigators. According to Fox 29 in Philadelphia, the number of alleged victims has more than doubled in just one day and as of Tuesday evening, approaches 20. Sandusky has yet to be charged in any of the new allegations that are coming in.

Paterno was scheduled to speak at a press conference Tuesday morning, but the conference was canceled, reportedly by Spanier. The Times later reported that Paterno will not hold an off campus press conference as was rumored. Paterno did coach Tuesday's practice.

According to the grand jury report that charges Sandusky with 40 counts of sex crimes against minors, Paterno was told of an incident involving Sandusky in a Penn State locker room in 2002 and reported that incident to his superiors But the head coach allegedly made no further effort to follow up on the incident as Sandusky enjoyed continued access to PSU facilities.

In a statement, NCAA president Mark Emmert said that the Sandusky scandal "is a criminal matter under investigation by law enforcement authorities and I will not comment on details."

"However, I have read the grand jury report and find the alleged assaults appalling," said Emmert. "As a parent and an educator, the notion that anyone would use a position of trust to prey on children is despicable. My thoughts and concern goes out to the alleged victims and their families."

State police commissioner Frank Noonan said Monday that Paterno fulfilled his legal obligations and was in no danger of being charged with any criminal wrongdoing, but that he felt the 84-year-old coach had not lived up to his moral obligations.

"Somebody has to question about what I would consider the moral requirements for a human being that knows of sexual things that are taking place with a child," Noonan said. "I think you have the moral responsibility, anyone. Not whether you're a football coach or a university president or the guy sweeping the building. I think you have a moral responsibility to call us."

For more on the story, here's this week's edition of the Doddcast. CBSSports.com's Dennis Dodd talks about the Penn State situation, Joe Paterno's legacy and potential replacements for Paterno, among other college football topics. You can subscribe to this podcast in the iTunes store



 
 
 
 
The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com