Tag:Jonathan Ogden
Posted on: July 1, 2011 1:07 pm
Edited on: July 5, 2011 10:40 am

CBSSports.com All-Time Pac-10 Team

Posted by Bryan Fischer

The Pac-10 is officially no more as of today, and after 33 years, the "Conference of Champions" has given us plenty of college football moments from some of the best players to ever play the game.

To commemorate the best that have worn the Pac-10 logo since Arizona and Arizona State were added in 1978, the record books were opened and the highlight tapes were watched in order to discover just who was the creme of the crop on the West Coast.

It's no surprise to see a healthy Southern California presence on the all-time team; after all, the Trojans won more conference titles than anybody else and have churned out elite players even during downturns. The list itself is actually pretty heavy on teams that will soon form the Pac-12 South, but when you consider that 51 percent of the conference's 132 All-Americans came from one of the two Los Angeles schools, you can see why.

As with most lists, there's plenty to debate, so feel free to voice your opinions in the comments.

With out further ado, the CBSSports.com All-time All-Pac-10 teams:

Pos Player, School Comment
QB Matt Leinart, USC 2004 Heisman Trophy winner, two national titles, Pac-10's career leader in TD passes, lowest percentage of passes intercepted in Pac-10 history, Pac-10 record for touchdowns in a season
RB Marcus Allen, USC 1981 Heisman Trophy winner, College Football Hall of Famer, Pac-10 record for rushes and yards in a season
RB Charles White, USC 1979 Heisman Trophy Winner, College Football Hall of Famer, Pac-10's all-time leading rusher
WR Dwayne Jarrett, USC Pac-10 record for career touchdowns, Two time consensus All-American
WR Troy Walters, Stanford Pac-10 record for career receiving yards, 1999 Biletnikoff Award winner, Stanford and Pac-10 career record for most yards gained
TE Tony Gonzalez, Cal All-Pac-10, All-Ameican
OL Brad Budde, USC College Football Hall of Famer, 1979 Lombardi Award Winner, three-time All-American
OL Tony Boselli, USC Three-time first team All-American, 1994 Morris Trophy
OL Randall McDaniel, Arizona State College Football Hall of Famer, member of 1987 Rose Bowl team, All-American, four-year starter
OL Alex Mack, Cal Two-time Morris Trophy winner, three-time All-Pac-10, 2008 Draddy Trophy winner
OL Jonathan Ogden, UCLA 1995 Outland Trophy winner, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
DL Tedy Bruschi, Arizona 1995 Morris Trophy winner, Pac-10 career leader in sacks (52), two-time All-American
DL Steve Emtman, Washington 1991 Outland and Lombardi Award winner, All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
DL Terrell Suggs, Arizona State 2002 Ted Hendricks, Lombardi and Nagurski Trophy winner, Pac-10 record for tackles for a loss in a season, NCAA record for sacks in a season
DL Ron Waldrop, Arizona 1993 Outland and Nagurski Award winner, two-time All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
LB Chris Claiborne, USC 1998 Butkus Award winner, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
LB Ricky Hunley, Arizona College football Hall of Famer, two-time All-American, 31 games with more than 10 tackles
LB Vernon Maxwell, Arizona State Three-time All-American, three-time All-Pac-10, school record for most fumbles in a season
DB Chuck Cecil, Arizona College Football Hall of Famer, 1987 Pac-10 Defensive Player of the Year, All-American, Tied conference record with four interceptions in one game
DB Kenny Easley, UCLA Four-time All-Pac-10, three-time All-American, College Football Hall of Famer
DB Ronnie Lott, USC College Football Hall of Famer, All-American, two-time All-Pac-10
DB Mike Richardson, Arizona State Two-time All-American, four-year starter
RET DeSean Jackson, Cal Pac-10 record for punt returns for touchdowns in a season (4) and career (6)
RET Maurice Jones-Drew, UCLA Holds NCAA record for highest average per punt return, school record for all-purpose yardage, All-American
K John Lee, UCLA Pac-10 record for most points by kicking, Pac-10's career FG percentage leader (85%) and an NCAA record for the most games in which a FG provided the winning margin (10)
P Nick Harris, Cal Consensus All-American, Conference and NCAA record for career punts and yardage

Second team

QB: John Elway, Stanford
RB: Ken Simonton, Oregon State; Toby Gerhart, Stanford
WR: Mike Hass, Oregon State; Keyshawn Johnson, USC
TE: Marcedes Lewis, UCLA
OL: Ryan Kalil, USC; Bruce Matthews, USC; Lincoln Kennedy, Washington; Gary Zimmerman, Oregon; Kris Farris, UCLA
DL: Rien Long, Washington State; Haloti Ngata, Oregon; Sedrick Ellis, USC; Ron Holmes, Washington
LB: Ron Rivera, Cal; Junior Seau, USC; Pat Tillman, Arizona State
DB: Mark Carrier, USC; Antoine Caison, Arizona; Darryl Lewis, Arizona; Troy Polamalu, USC
RET: Sammie Stroughter, Oregon State; Chris Owusu, Stanford
K: Jason Hansen, Washington State
P: Josh Bidwell, Oregon

Posted on: March 7, 2011 7:03 pm
Edited on: March 7, 2011 7:05 pm

POLL: Who's the most deserving CFB HOF candidate?

Posted by Adam Jacobi

This year's Hall of Fame ballot is out, and like always, it's huge; there are 79 players and nine coaches up for voting, and only a small fraction of those 88 men will be voted in this year. The first-balloters include Tommie Frazier and Derrick Thomas, and both have strong credentials for immediate induction.

And yet, upon even a cursory glance at the list of candidates (PDF), it's readily apparent that there are a lot of guys on this list who not only deserve to be voted in, but probably deserved (and did not receive) first-ballot induction themselves. We found six very worthy players, and we'd like you all to vote on which one is most deserving of joining the greats. And yes, it's worth noting that this is a college football-only Hall of Fame, and there are some guys with long, fantastic NFL careers ... but they were all amazing in college football too! Choose wisely at our Facebook page, and if you need a refresher on any of the six men involved, a quick recap is below.

Brian Bosworth (LB, Oklahoma, '84-'86): Bosworth was the face of college football in the mid-'80s -- a brash, loud, cocky self-promoter who played like a laser-guided tornado. Oklahoma gave up fewer than 10 points per game during the three years Bosworth played in Norman, including an absurd 6.75 ppg in 1986 and a comparatively pedestrian 8.6 ppg in the Sooners' national championship 1985 season. His NFL career quickly flamed out with the Seahawks, as did a fledgling acting career, but for three magical years at OU, Bosworth was on top of the world.

Eric Dickerson (RB, Southern Methodist, '79-'82): 30 years ago, the "Pony Express" was the hottest show in a conference full of them: the SWC. Backfield mates Dickerson and Craig James lit up opposing defenses in their junior and senior seasons, but Dickerson was clearly the better rusher of the two. He would finish with over 1,400 yards rushing and 19 touchdowns his junior year, and he topped 1,600 yards and finished third in Heisman voting as a senior in 1982. Again, all this while splitting carries. Of course, SMU was fraught with illegal behavior that would eventually bring a death sentence down on the program, but the accomplishments of Dickerson and his teammates stay undisturbed in the record books, as they ought to be.

Eddie George (RB, Ohio State, '92-'95): It would be a shame if Eddie George were being punished for relatively light workloads during his first two seasons (including a nightmarish two-fumble 18-16 loss to Illinois as a freshman), because by his senior year, George was one of the most unstoppable tailbacks in the post-Barry Sanders era of college football. George beat out the aforementioned Tommie Frazier for the 1995 Heisman Trophy after a 1,927-yard, 24-touchdown senior season in which George topped 100 rushing yards in every contest.

Russell Maryland (DT, Miami, '86-'90): If something about Nick Fairley's 2010 season with Auburn seemed a bit familiar, it's probably thanks to Russell Maryland's career with the 'Canes; like Fairley, Maryland was a 6'1" DT with freakish disruption and pursuit skills. They've also both got rings as anchors of their respective defensive lines: Fairley last year, and Maryland in '89 (he also won a championship as a reserve in '87). As for Maryland's senior year, he racked up 96 tackles and 10.5 sacks en route to the Outland Trophy and the top spot in the NFL draft.

Jonathan Ogden (OT, UCLA, '92-'95): Ogden was one of the best NFL tackles of his generation, but he was also utterly outstanding at UCLA too, picking up the Outland Award and unanimous first-team All-American decorations his senior year. He gave up just two sacks in his last two years with the Bruins, and more importantly set a new standard for franchise left tackles. Ogden played at a legitimate 6'8", and anywhere from 310 to 365 pounds (though really in the reverse order; he showed up to campus over 350 pounds, but was down to a svelte 318 by the time the NFL combine rolled around). With that unbelievable size came even more freakish athleticism, as Ogden had faster feet than players 50 pounds lighter than him. Think of the high-profile left tackles that have come out of college football since Ogden was drafted: aside from maybe Orlando Pace, the common quality of such players as Robert Gallery, Jake Long, or Joe Thomas is that they may have been good, but they're no Jonathan Ogden.

Deion Sanders (CB, FSU, 1985-1988): If Bosworth owned the mid-'80s in college football, Neon Deion was the immediate successor to the Boz's throne, electrifying college football with his other-worldly speed, coverage, and kick return ability. Everything Sanders did was larger than life: his play on the field, his cocky personality, his short-lived rap career, everything (except the tackling, of course). At the end of the day, though, it's hard to argue with his results: two-time consensus first-team All-American and third-team All-American as a senior at cornerback, the FSU career punt return yardage record, and a retired jersey number (at a powerhouse program, no less) seven years later. 

So who's it going to be? VOTE NOW at our Facebook page!

Posted on: October 12, 2010 8:48 pm

Former agent admits giving illegal cash, benefits

Posted by Adam Jacobi

Back when the news about Gary Wichard, John Blake, and the now-infamous Miami party first hit, it was only remarkable in that all the people involved went ahead with the whole deal because they assumed they'd get away with it. And being that Wichard's been in the business for decades, it's unlikely that this was his first foray into shady business.

And now that we've all seen the article penned by former agent John Luchs, we can see exactly why everyone thought it was a good idea: agents commit NCAA violations all the time. Luchs cops to giving cash or benefits to over 30 different college players over the course of seven years, and not once was he or the player in question ever disciplined in any respect.

And yet, Luchs doesn't have any remorse about his work as an agent, and that's probably smart; paying players is only damaging insofar as it's illegal, not because it actually has any debilitating effect on the player's ability to perform on the football.

Still, there's a case to be made for following the rules here; while Luchs lands high-caliber players and high draft picks all over the place, the level of NFL success was higher for the guys who refused Luchs' money; those players include Keyshawn Johnson, Dana Stubblefield, and Jonathan Ogden (though Ogden did accept some concert tickets, and that's definitely a story worth reading). Meanwhile, Luchs' most successful client who took money was probably either Tony Banks or Jamir Miller; other clients included high-round draft picks Ryan Leaf, Joel Steed, and Kanavis McGhee. Which, yeah. 

The most damaging part of the story, in fact, is the part involving Gary Wichard, and that's even considering the fact that Luchs credits Wichard with telling him not to pay players. It's still bad, and here's why:


Gary used his contacts in the coaching community to help him get players. This has recently come into public view, as the NCAA and the state of North Carolina are investigating the Tar Heels football program and whether John Blake, a Carolina assistant coach since 2007, steered players to Gary and received money from him. It's no secret in the agent business that some college coaches steer players to certain agents. I laughed when I heard Gary deny in the media that John ever worked with Pro Tect.

When I was with Gary, John worked hand in hand with us, and Gary called him his "partner." John was the defensive line coach of the Dallas Cowboys when they won Super Bowls XXVIII and XXX, and the head coach at Oklahoma from '96 through '98. He was one of the best recruiters I'd ever seen. He was just electric, and I leveraged him to get clients whenever I could.

So, yes. John Blake is completely radioactive now, and while it's nice to hear Butch Davis tell people he regrets trusting John Blake, it's really a wonder that Davis even trusted him in the first place; Blake's either a genius at hiding his involvement with Wichard, or Davis ignored a lot of red flags in hiring the former Oklahoma head man.

The views expressed in this blog are solely those of the author and do not reflect the views of CBS Sports or CBSSports.com