Tag:Kansas City Chiefs
Posted on: December 8, 2011 7:24 pm
 

Weis to Kansas: a good move for Florida?

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

When Will Muschamp took the podium at his Gator Bowl press conference Thursday evening reportedly looking less than "thrilled." Muschamp rarely looks happy in front of the press, of course, but in this case he had particular reason to be on edge: his offensive coordinator, Charlie Weis, had left Florida for the Kansas head coaching position without reportedly even offering Muschamp the courtesy of telling him he was interviewing.

Muschamp did say he was "very happy" for Weis and "and clarified that running backs coach Brian White -- a holdover from the Urban Meyer staff -- will serve as the team's coordinator in the bowl game. The short term fit of Meyer's players with Weis's schemes has been awkward all season, and the short term situation between now and taking on Meyer's own future Ohio State Buckeyes is even more awkward.

Long term, though, we wonder if Weis didn't just do Muschamp a favor. Muschamp has stated repeatedly that what he wants out of an offense is the kind of offense his old bosses Nick Saban and Tommy Tuberville used when Muschamp was their coordinators; a pro-style, run-first, pound-it-out offense that milks clock, controls the game, and makes putting together a championship-quality defense that much easier. He reiterated in Thursday's press conference that he will be hiring another pro-style coordinator, someone "very similar schmatically."

But in retrospect, Weis certainly wasn't going to produce the smashmouth offense Muschamp wanted with Meyer's leftovers -- the Gators ranked 75th nationally in rushing with Muschamp openly coveting larger tailbacks by seaon's end -- and it seems likely Weis wasn't going to produce that offense in Gainesville, ever. He hasn't produced it anywhere, with the exception of a few games with the Kansas City Chiefs; his Notre Dame teams were centered on the arm of Brady Quinn first and then Jimmy Clausen second, with the running game an afterthought. The proof is in the statistical pudding: his five Irish teams finished 55th, 72nd, 115th, 105th, and 84th in FBS rushing.

Finding a new offensive coordinator is no doubt going to be a headache for Muschamp; along with White, the only candidate mentioned in the press conference was famous 1980s Gator quarterback and current Jacksonville Dolphins head coach Kerwin Bell. (Another possibility: former colleague and current Murray State head coach Chris Hatcher.) Whoever Muschamp picks will have to do quick work to win over recruits before Signing Day, get his system into place in spring practice, and have things ready to roll with the Gators' new starting QB next fall. Upheaval is never easy. 

But given how little Weis's offense both this year and in past years resembled what Muschamp had requested of him, it's for the best for Muschamp and the Gators that the upheaval is taking place now, before Weis's failures in the ground game gobbled up any more seasons and particularly seasons with more promise than this transitional one ever had. Muschamp may not be thrilled at the moment. But if he makes the right hire this time around, he may be thrilled when he looks back on it some day.

Posted on: July 8, 2011 9:57 am
Edited on: July 8, 2011 9:58 am
 

Report: Mike Vrabel could join OSU coaching staff

Posted by Chip Patterson

While the NFL lockout appears to be nearing the end of this extensive process, one legendary linebacker may already be considering a move into the coaching ranks. According to multiple reports, most notably from College Football Talk's John Taylor, "there's a very good chance" Kansas City Chiefs linebacker Mike Vrabel will return to his alma mater and join Luke Fickell's staff at Ohio State.

As Josh Katzowitz from the Eye on Football pointed out, Fickell and Vrabel were roomates when they played for the Buckeyes. Vrabel technically is a free agent, and it is unknown what the market will be for the 35-year-old Pro Bowler with three Super Bowl rings. He started in all 16 games last season, and recently reminded media that he still has time left on the gridiron.

But when the lockout ends and free agency opens, it is possible that Vrabel will find his best fit back in Columbus. He has openly mentioned a plan to return to coaching eventually, and this kind of opportunity might be perfect for a passionate alum looking to aid a scarred program.
Posted on: March 16, 2011 12:12 pm
 

Spring Practice Primer: Florida

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

College Football has no offseason. Every coach knows that the preparation for September begins now, in Spring Practice . So we here at the Eye on College Football  will get you ready as teams open spring ball with our Spring Practice Primers . Today, we look at Florida , who starts spring practice today.

Spring Practice Question: What's going to be drawn on the blank slate of the Florida offense?

As spring practice 2011 opens, there may be no single unit in the entire country more intriguing than the Florida offense.

It's true. Consider that just three years ago it was the envy of college football, an unstoppable force led by the Heisman-winning Tim Tebow, featuring the most explosive receiving/rushing playmaker in the college game in Percy Harvin, drawn up and play-called by one of the best spread-option gurus in the nation in Dan Mullen, positively littered with future successful pros like Maurkice Pouncey and Aaron Hernandez ... it was the kind of offense custom-built to win a national championship, and it did. And then two seasons later, in the hands of Steve Addazio,  it was a crumbling heap that finished an unthinkable 82nd in total offense. That was an offense built to go 7-5, and it did, too.

So it's hardly surprising Will Muschamp decided to scrap the entire thing and start over. It's maybe somewhat surprising, though, he'd start over with something he's familiar with but Florida hasn't run in ages: a true two-back, under-center, pro-style system as run by the newly-contented Charlie Weis.

The result of that decision is that what we know about the new Gator offense is dwarfed by what we don't, the questions at this stage far outnumbering the answers. A sampling:

Is Weis's offense going to incorporate anything left over from the Meyer era? It's not what Weis knows or what Muschamp hired him for, so don't expect much different from Weis's offenses at Notre Dame or the Kansas City Chiefs. But with a collection of personnel recruited for (and in many cases, much better-suited) the Meyer spread, there must be the temptation to include certain elements of the old scheme here and there. We'll see if Weis gives in to that temptation this spring.

Can John Brantley's career be salvaged? If there's any former Meyer recruit who might have been happy to see the offense overhauled, it would have to be the pass-first Brantley, who was asked by Addazio to fill many of the running-game holes Tebow did without only the tiniest fraction of the success. Weis's system could make Brantley a star, but whatever offense he's running, Brantley will have to be substantially more poised this spring if he's going to hold off a challenge from early-enrolled freshman Jeff Driskel.

What happens to the heirs to Harvin? What success the Gator offense had in 2010 was frequently the result of getting the ball to Jeff Demps, the diminutive sprinter who took several handoffs the distance. But a pro-style tailback job doesn't typically go to backs of Demps's (or fellow veteran blazer Chris Rainey's) size, and Demps's history of nagging injuries won't help him convince Weis and Muschamp he or Rainey will be ready to be an every-down back. With one of those injuries sidelining Demps for at least the start of spring, the larger Mike Gillislee or Mack Brown may be able to stake their claim to the position.

Will the offensive line bounce back? Much of the disappointment of 2010 started with the disappointing play up front, as a veteran line began its year with Mike Pouncey memorably dribbling snaps back to Brantley in the season opener and never seemed to truly recover. Now the Gators enter spring with a new line coach brought in from the NFL in Frank Verducci, and just one healthy 2010 starter available. But the competition for open spots and fresh voice following the departure of Addazio could lead to better results all the same.

Will any playmakers step up in the receiving positions? Yes, the receivers were a problem last year too, as the entire corps of wideouts and tight ends totaled just eight touchdown receptions and as a team the Gators averaged barely more than 10 yards a completion. Deonte Thompson led the way by netting 15 yards per-catch and 570 yards total; a big spring should establish him as the team's clearcut No. 1 and a potential All-SEC candidate. But it will also be worth watching Jordan Reed and Trey Burton, top-drawer athletes who moonlighted as Wildcat quarterbacks a year ago and have been shifted into starting roles as a tight end and slot receiver, respectively. If Thompson's ready to take the next step and Weis can find the best way to put Reed and Burton to use, the Gators could come out of spring with plenty of optimism regarding their receiving corps.

With so many questions, it seems unlikely Florida will find the right answers to all of them. But with so many potential answers at virtually any position you choose, whatever Weis and Muschamp cook up, it promises to be fascinating viewing ... and at the least, a good bit more effective than the not-even-close-to-fascinating viewing the Gators offered last season.


Posted on: January 5, 2011 12:06 pm
Edited on: January 5, 2011 12:07 pm
 

Still no transfer decision for John Brantley

Posted by Jerry Hinnen

If the Urban Meyer spread-option regime was still in charge at Florida, no one would bat an eye at John Brantley exploring his transfer options. (There's probably no truth to the rumor they've added a picture of him running the zone read to the Dictionary of American Slang under "square peg in a round hole," but we wouldn't blame them if they had.) But with Will Muschamp heralding a new offensive era in Gainesville and Charlie Weis, the coach that turned Brady Quinn and Jimmy Clausen into first-round draft picks, now in the offensive coordinator's chair, you'd think that would be enough to placate Brantley, right?

It might be. But not just yet :

After a difficult first season as a starter and Urban Meyer 's resignation, the redshirt junior is considering leaving a school.

As of Wednesday morning, Brantley and his family hadn't made a decision.

"We hadn't talked and probably won't talk until Charlie Weis is here," said his father, John Brantley III. "I hadn't even talked to him."

That means the Brantleys might be waiting a bit; Weis isn't expected in Gainesville until after his season concludes with the Kansas City Chiefs .

Between Brantley losing a year of eligibility in the event of a transfer (assuming he stays within the FBS) and Weis's reputation for grooming quarterbacks, it still seems unlikely Brantley will bolt. But if he does, it will make things awfully awkward for Muschamp and Weis in their first season; the only other quarterbacks on the depth chart are Trey Burton and Jordan Reed, neither of which will be a good fit at all for Weis's dropback-passer schemes. That would likely make incoming true freshman Jeff Driskel the starter by default, and though Driskel is one of the most highly-regarded recruits in the country, asking any true freshman to step in and take the reins for an SEC team from Day 1 is asking for trouble.

So expect Muschamp and Weis to make their best sales pitch to Brantley as soon as they possibly can. Their first season with the Gators might just depend on it.
 
 
 
 
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